The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 35: When Marketing Runs Sales feat Stephanie Cox

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When Marketing Runs Sales feat Stephanie Cox

...the Hello, everyone, and welcome back to the revenue collective podcast. I am your new co host, Brandon Martin, and you are listening to Is this a good time show where I asked revenue Collective members some really basic questions, and they have incredible answers. In a short, 15 minute conversation, programming note will be coming to you on Tuesdays and Thursdays, each weeks of smash that subscribe button. You don't miss an opportunity to learn from members of our RC community here, any of which of who could be your future boss. Our guest today is Stephanie Cox. She's the VP of sales and marketing at looming bait, and we get into what happens when marketing leaders were promoted to run sales. Before we get going with those questions, I wanted to say a little bit more about this one. Sponsor six cents six cents. The number one account engagement platform helps you identify accounts that are in market for your solution. Prioritize your efforts, engage buyers the right way with relevant messaging and measure what...

...actually matters with the six cents platform, you are able to get into more deals, improved when rates increase overall pipeline and optimize budget. Spend Toe Learn Mawr, visit six cents dot com slash revenue collected. All right, let's do this Episode one Is this a good time? Great. Stephanie, thank you so much for being here with us. We have Stephanie Cox, who's the VP of sales and marketing at Looming bait, and we're excited to chat with you today. Thanks for having me on. Even though it is a Friday afternoon at four o'clock and I don't have a drink, I was gonna say just all you need to do is get a beverage. It'll be fine. So, look, as you know, we go through things kind of lightning round style. And so when you start us off with you know what your current role is and how you got here, Yeah, I lied. Sales, marketing, product and customer success that will move it. So, really, anything that touches the customer is on my team, and I have been in really the marketing world most of my career. For 15 years I've worked at, I would say, like medium sized companies as well as large companies like Ingersoll Rand,...

Salesforce and really grew up, you know, learning how to do digital is where it all started for me, because when I graduated college in early two thousands, you know I was young and everyone's like, Well, you'll figure out like the Internet in the website and like the social things right And I'm like, Sure, and it really, you know, worked out nicely for me. But I've had the pleasure of, you know, launching products globally, managing sales teams, you know, taking on product management and customer success. Now it's been a great ride, and, you know, it's hard to believe that it's been almost 20 or since I graduated college. Same for me. Let's not mention that again. So So you obviously wear a lot of hats. It's kind of, you know, faras, the revenue collective goes. We have many people involved in revenue generation, many people involved in marketing, and I would say a handful that they're doing both of those things. That's kind of interesting as you've made the transition from a full time market over the sales side, any kind of advice that you'd be giving, you know, one side of the other and how to get along. I've always gotten really along well with sales leaders I think partially because...

I make that. My mission I always had throughout my career is you know, if you know, Mom and Dad fight like bad things happen, so getting everyone on the same page is important. But I think when you take over sales, especially from a marketing perspective, there is a perception. I've never carried a bag. And so sometimes there's a perception that, like, Well, how is this person gonna be able to do it? And what I would tell you is, you know, I get where that's coming from, but at the same token, you know, if I look back to when I started my career, I've always been involved in the sales process. You know, I had a boss when I was at Ingersoll Rand and we were selling home motivation. Thio. You know, big builders like Pulte Lynn are you know, he used to call Call me the Closer He's like, you're you're who we send it with the sales team. We want to close the deal, and I'm like, Don't tell people that, like, I don't wanna keep like, I'm not in sales. But I think what is unique about me is I've always been part of it, but never like owned the quota. But I've always helped do it. And I've always, I think, brought a different perspective because, you know, I'm truly trying to help, you know, a...

...prospect or customer. E mean, let's be honest, I'm also trying to sell to them and help the company I'm working for, but it's never been seen that way. And so when I took over the sales organization, I was, You know, at that time I had been at limit bait, you know, 2.5 years, and so everyone had already seen me be involved in the sales process. I had helped close almost every large deal we had closed so far, so it wasn't a big surprise to anyone. It felt like a natural. Well, I mean, of course, Stephanie would do it, but it's been fun, but I think there's a perception on the outside sometimes where it's like, Well, how is she qualified to do this like she's never sold before? But I can tell you, you know, marketing leaders that are strong and that understand the sales process, and I've spent time with sales reps. Executives and are willing to learn and listen can lead a team and canceling the sales team effectively. I totally agree. I think I often think that sales people become salespeople way before they take the first job. Is this right? You fall in love with a prior to that or seem to grow the skill set, and then...

...you get the job that puts the word sales in your title. So that's on all that. Well, look, you know, here we believe that success is always made up of both hard work and luck. So I always like to ask people to give us an example of each. Give us an example where hard work, really, you know, propelled your career. And then also where you got lucky. Yeah, I'll start with a lucky one. And it's so great that you mentioned because it's true, right? There are times when you look back on your career where you realize like I was in a really unique situation that impacted me for the last 10 years, and for me, that was when I was at Ingersoll Rand. So we were this really kind of weird startup environment for home automation that was D I Y. Inside this $14 billion company and I was in charge of it was like a vague title like I was like the marketing manager for subscriber engagement, which meant, like I owned subscribers. I owned the pricing I own, like part of the product roadmap, and our product was home automation and primarily native APS. And that's where I got started in Mobile. So, you know, I started my career there in 2000 and 10, when which it sounds crazy. But like that's, you...

...know, you're before the APP store kind of came out. So you always have to. You have to think of things in relative terms. Of course there was. You know, it wasn't there was no absolutely 1010 right? So it was kind of crazy, right? Like I started when you know, that was all fairly new and its infancy. So, you know, I've done blackberry APS. I've done android apps. I've done IOS apps because of that role and when you know, we used to debate having a Windows phone app, and that's really where I fell in love with mobile. And that's also where I got my first experience launching internationally as well, and I kind of just looked into that. Did I work hard to get that position? 1000%. But I think also it was kind of perfect timing, right? Like who knew that this idea of mobile app was going to take off the way that it did? Who knew that I would go into other roles, you know, like an exact target. Salesforce and other places later were international would be so important to my role. So it was kind of like a a really lucky break for me. All that I got to experience...

...there. That's amazing. And of course, you know, I'm sure hard work along the way. Give us a place where you were hustling your time of your hustling hard. I think there's been probably no time that I've hustled the hardest on that limit bait. Anyone that worked with me at exact target of Salesforce would probably say I hustled really hard there, too. But here I hustle really, really hard, and I think it's for a couple of different reasons. One You know, when you're in startups scale up mode, you are resource constrained. Everything about the company moves as fast as you move. And so I think sometimes people don't realize that that the biggest constraint is really you in your time. So to me, I'm hard work has been part of that. I think that's also why I've grown so much that limit personally. You know, when I look at, I came in as the VP of marketing. Then I became VP of sales and took on our sales and marketing. And then, you know, shortly thereafter, you know, I started seeing problems like I solve problems with how we were our customer delivery, that we weren't doing it the way that, you know, I thought we should So I have this kind of motto of like, Well, if no one's taking it over, I'm...

...just gonna take it over until someone tells me to knock it off. So that's what I did. And then I took. Then I officially took it over, and then the same thing kinda happened with product management. I thought there was some gaps and I just started influencing it. And then it kind of just became well like, Well, you should just own the sun, like clearly your team should on this. And here we are. This is the difference between start ups and everything else in startups. When you take on products, no one's going to tell you to stop taking them on. So a so long as you're being successful at it, that that's incredible. Well, you know, I always want to know, you know, one sales or marketing tactic that maybe people that are listening could actually apply to what they're currently working on or they're doing. Give us a good example of a sales tactic that we may not know about. That that you would say, Hey, works for you. Yeah. So I think, you know, a lot of people will say, like, the traditional stuff do personalized video, direct mail and, like, yes, toe all those things, I could talk about those. But I fight to think about, you know, what's the one thing that's really stood out for us is a brand has been our podcast. Eso is gonna get a little meta as I talk about podcasting...

...on a podcast. But you know, when you are a company that is not salesforce, that has, you know, multimillion dollar pr spend and you are trying to make noise. The best way to do that is to associate your brand with other large brands. Sure, and yes, you can do that with customers. But that's hard. Like, How do you get your name in the same line as Amazon? How do your name in the same line as Google? You know, it's good. Take a long time for them to become a customer, right? So we launched our podcast 2018 with the sole goal of getting our name in conjunction with other large brands. So marketing and tech leaders at brands like Amazon, Craig Ola, Campbell Soup, etcetera and it wasn't to sell them anything, right? Like we're not trying to generate leads or anything like that. But it was just Thio start to position us in the same realm that they're in, and it was wildly successful, like the number I looked back and I go, you know who we got on the show is kind of crazy that...

...first season, but it is something you could do today because here's the thing. When you reach out to sales, marketing and tech leaders, almost all of them are willing to talk about themselves like like, do you get knows? I mean, yes, you do get some of those, but for the most part, people are willing, especially if you've done your homework and you know what they're an expert in and you ask them to come on and talk about that where they don't have to do any prep work, they'll say yes, that's awesome. Well, I mean, this is exactly why we're doing this. I just wanted my name next to yours. So So when we see it on LinkedIn, this was all a ploy Thio to do that and and with your brand. So love it. That's a great piece of advice. And and for those of you that don't know Oh, starting a podcast sounds hard. It is not hard. There are tools out there. People could DME I'm happy toe walk you through that. You know what we do here at the revenue Collective? It is not hard, and it just takes a little bit of time and effort. So love that one. Anything you're hiring for that you want to talk about is we kind of wind down. Yeah, I would say I'm always hiring for rock star sales executives, right? Like so you...

...know, there are a tremendous amount of great sales town out there, and I want to talk to every single one of them anytime that they're interested in what we're doing and passionate about what we're doing. Cool. I love that. And who could not be passionate about mobile right now, with everything that's going on, any shoutouts on people that that our audience here should follow that has great content or even some up and comers that we should look out for? Yeah, I would say I'm a moderator for the Marketing for Marketers Channel, so I'm a little enamored with everyone that comes to our weekly marketing talks. So I would say, You know, I think if you have a marketing question, I'd highly asked, you know, encourage you guys to ask that in the ass marketing channel. There's a a ton of great marketers there that could answer it. But, you know, I wouldn't call anyone out specifically, but there's a wide variety of great people that have some, really, I think, great insights to share. Cool. What about outside of revenue collective on LinkedIn, anybody that you're that you love their thought leadership and just, like, get inspired from it. Maybe even outside of the biz. Yeah, so my personal, I would say, like...

...brand crash is Burger King right now, which I know sounds really weird. I don't eat their food, I'm have a gluten allergy, so I can't. But what they've done and for his name's Fernando because CML is really brilliant in terms from a marketing perspective. So I'm kind of obsessed with everything that they dio and what he shares, because I think they just have They don't do crazy, innovative thing. So what I mean by that is you know, the stuff they dio isn't something that, like no one's ever done before. They just do it in a way that no one's ever done it, which is cool. Sure, Recently, last year they did this one where if you got up to a McDonald's, you can get a free whopper or something. So, like, yeah, that's that was this crazy? I think that's an awesome answer just for inspiration. Cool. And lastly, our last question of the day is always because I am a restaurant lover and obsessive with restaurants. Give me some place to go eat that. I don't know. Okay. My favorite place in Chicago is called rpm Italian. Nice. So it is, especially if...

...you have a gluten allergy. They have really great gluten free pasta. That's homemade as well. As my husband says, Delicious other normal pasta. But it's my like my go to place every time I go to Chicago together. I love you. Let us entertain you. I'm a huge fan of their brand, so I've eaten there. E can second this It is delicious. Stephanie, thank you so much for being here today. Awesome to chat with you even for this short while and can't wait to see around the halls of slack in the RC. Thanks for having me by e. All right, that's our show. Thanks so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in the apple podcasts or Spotify app. Send it to some friends, or please make sure to smash that subscribe Button yourself a reminder. This episode was brought to you by six cents powered by AI and Predictive Analytics. Six cents helps you to unite your entire revenue team with a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue growth. Had a lot of fun today. I hope you did too. Now go crush your numbers.

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