The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 9 months ago

Ep 116: The Best Way To Train and Enable Your Sales Team w/ Maria Bross

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 116: The Best Way To Train and Enable Your Sales Team w/ Maria Bross 

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.  

All right, thank God it's monday. Welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. This is your host, Tom Alamo. This is where revenue leaders come to learn the tips, the tricks, the tactics that they need to be successful in their roles. Super excited for this episode with Maria bras as our guest a little bit about Maria. She's down in charleston south Carolina sales manager for north America at Rock Content. She's also a three time linked in top 100 sales star. She's the sc raw powerlifting record holder. She's a mama to be a self proclaimed seeker of truth. A friend of mine and is someone that's super passionate about enablement and training and development of salespeople Before her time at Rock Content, she was running enablement over at Boom town has held several egg rolls bin in the space for just about a decade. So we talked a ton about her switch from E to enablement to sales manager, getting back in the quota chair, how she's training and developing her reps, some latest trends you see and I think it's really going to enjoy this episode before we get to that. Let's give a quick shout out to our sponsor. This episode is brought to you by drift. More than 50,000 businesses use drift to grow revenue and increase customer lifetime value faster drift, helps their customers alliance sales and marketing on a single platform to deliver a unified customer experience where people are free to have a conversation with the business at any time on their terms, learn more at dot com. You can also find more about me. I'm tom Alamo, I work over at going, you can add me on linked in otherwise, feel free to give this podcast subscribe on Apple or Spotify or wherever you're listening. Without further ado, let's get into my conversation with Maria, the boss ross. Alright, Maria, good morning. Welcome to the Pavilion podcast. How are you? Good morning. Good early morning to you tom I know we're just watching the sunrise here up up through my window. What's shaking? Where are you right now in the world? I'm in charleston south Carolina. Okay, nice. That's home base for you, isn't it? Okay, nice. We're excited to have you on and congrats on the somewhat recent role heading over to rock content. Yes, sir, I'm excited. So, you know, one thing I wanted to talk to you about, we had talked in the past on on my other podcast about your path from a rock star A. E. And then getting into the world of enablement and you've gone over back to the dark side of the quota world. So I'd love to hear you just talk a little bit about the transition one for people that are maybe aren't as familiar with you of of 82 enablement. And then going back into the world of now in sales management and working on, you know, more of like the quota side, uh, and the deal side...

...of the business versus just like the training side. Yeah. So, um, I spent seven years in outbound selling prospecting roles for BTB tech companies and learned a lot, really struggled as a ref. Like I'm very transparent with my team now that I've been on a pit before, I've, I've really struggled myself so I know what it's like, you know how difficult it can be in a sales role that, you know, that's why we can make so much money in sales because it really is so hard. So I did that for a long time and learned a lot. I went on that pitch, but I was mentioned earlier and I was able to learn a lot from that experience and I realized, hey, I can learn to be good at sales. I'm not seeking feedback, I'm not seeking to learn and grow my skills and that practicing outside of work. And this is really why I'm feeling so um, I started investing a lot of time into just like my education of sales and networking, reaching out to people trying to learn from others, listening to podcasts, reading more and my commission checks reflected that. And I got to feel a lot more confident on the phone and like I was delivering a lot more value and really fell in love with sales in the process. And because of that, because I needed all this guidance and I wasn't naturally good at sales. I built a lot of like sales enablement materials at the time, I didn't realize like that's what it was that I was building, but when there was a sales enablement roll open, I was one of the people that my company at the time talked to and was like, hey, have you thought about a career in sales enablement before? And I was like before this company, I didn't even know what sales enablement was like, no, I haven't thought of it, I've always wanted to be a sales manager and they're like, well this could be a good stuff in that direction, just to take on more of a coaching role, training role, but you can spend a lot of time creating those documents that you're creating for your team right now, um and actually get paid for it without a quota. And I was like, that sounds pretty interesting. So I went into sales people well, I first started out in one of like a communications sales enablement role, where I was doing some of the training and onboarding, but my primary focus was really like going to different departmental meetings, let's say with product or with the support team or CS, and seeing like any changes that were happening in their departments would affect sales, like, for example, if there was a new release coming out in product without impact sales is demos, so I was really that liaison between those different departments and don't have to communicate that and train them if there was like, a big change happening. So that was a really great education into like what different departments do, how they interact, how different pieces of the business impact each other and really loved it. And then in my most recent role at Boom town, I started the sales enablement program from the ground up, and that was a big learning experience for me, I mean and probably the best opportunity of my career. I really learned so much in that role,...

...had incredible leadership and a lot of creative freedom to just take it and build what I wanted to build from it. So really just kind of like a unicorn situation and yeah, and really fell on the team, built the onboarding program from the ground up and did a lot of coaching of the reps, worked with the sales leadership team very, very closely and love that there. I was able to grow a lot in those two years, learn a lot from sales leaders there and also just being kind of thrown into the position and being like, wow, I don't know what I'm doing, I need to reach out to other people and Watch videos like 7th actors videos and sales hood, for example, were so huge for me then and I just binge watched all of those and, and started built out the program based on her expertise and what she thinks that how you should build a sales enablement program. It worked out really well. The team did Over 100% of gold during the pandemic that year, so it was incredible. I saw a lot of growth and then I started to get in the position, It definitely wasn't boring. I just definitely didn't not feel challenged because I was, it was more so that I would get so attached to the sales reps and onboarding and training and it felt like I had to give them up to their sales management to continue on and I didn't want to. And so it was almost like that feeling when you move from being a BDR and you're ready to become an E. Where it's like you've developed this relationship, you've delivered value, you want to help this, this potential client and then it's like okay cool. Here a here's this great opportunity now you go close it and it sort of felt like that sort of hand off from sales training to their sales manager. So I got more interested again into going into sales management and this opportunity with rob came up and it was it was a really awesome opportunity again to build something from the ground up like I did at boom town but from a sales management perspective nothing really was defined yet. For the U. S. Sales team, the Brazilian sales team has been like number one brand, lots of brand recognition and huge clients, their students super well but our U. S. Market just started in january so um really just building that, building up the team hiring and starting out the outbound processes there. So it's been a journey, it's really challenging, it's really exciting and again like being thrown into this like that's something I'm learning on my feet and trying to reach out to others and so to process that makes it a well oiled machine so that you know, we can really grow from there. Yeah, so it sounds like in your last two roles, you really kind of taken it 0-1, 1st on the enablement side and then now on like an outbound sales motion. So I'd love to talk about both those experiences for anyone that might be wanting to or currently in that same process of trying to build from the ground up. So...

I'm curious like okay you go into a boom town and you are trying to build out their enablement, you know, whole organs and structure. Like you said, you just binge watched videos and you're trying to educate yourself. Like, what were the first steps that you took, like? Because when I think about enablement, there's so many things that it could look like, right, it could be like, content for the A. S, it could be like, how do you onboard wraps? It could be, I don't know, like, scripts for, you know, Sdrs, like, where do you start? And maybe it's none of those three things that I just made those up on the spot. No, it is. I mean, you're completely right. I did all of those things at boom town and it was so fun to do, but you're right in the fact that prioritization is really the challenge because there's so many cool exciting things you do you can do, especially brand new sales enablement, like, whatever you do, it's going to make an impact from having nothing to having something. So that's what I had to like have peace with myself that night at the end of the day that it's like, okay, I'm trying to prioritize these things, but whatever I do is going to be better than nothing and we're going to see results from it. So that was good to know going into it. But really the first thing that I did, and the first thing I'm doing now is a sales manager is almost for lack of better terms and audit. So a lot of observing, a lot of listening to calls, lot of getting to know the different departments and seeing where there's gaps. So, you know, that's the biggest thing, especially from sales enablement. They had a pretty sophisticated sales organization at boom town where they had processes built out, they had a really great leadership team, they had reps that had been in the role for years. So there was a lot of areas for me to observe and to learn from them and to interview the reps, interview the leadership, interview the leaders from other teams to see where I can make the biggest impact first. So I really just made like a list of those different areas and and sort of waited weighed them out based on what would be make the biggest impact. And for us specifically, it was the onboarding program because they were basically doubling their sales team within that year. So it was like, wow, we really have to get standardization across the board and what training looks like if we're really going to set these wraps up for success. So that's where I spent the majority of my time is really um, documenting tribal knowledge, building out the content for onboarding for training and testing things to see if it works. I mean, I made lots of adjustments. I trained 42 reps in the pandemic, so that was just like the virtual part of the year and then I trained probably a similar number of reps prior to that. So there was lots of iterations, almost, it's definitely every month, sometimes more frequently than that, that I was on boarding new reps and it was awesome to have the...

...support of the sales managers and they would help me as well and sometimes no more of the tenure wraps and the team would come in and lead sessions to which I was really grateful for. But yeah, just like you learn a lot from the different iterations of the trainings, Like for example, one of the biggest ones was when I first started out I would do the training and it would be okay, this is all about the company, this is all about the product, these are the people that we sell to this the day in the life. And then I realized, and you know when we do the cool car role plays, when we would talk like it would be very product focus in cold calls and I was like, ooh, before we talk about products, let me sort of switch these things around a little bit and now we spend like the first four or five days just on buyer personas, the jobs to be done by the people were talking to really getting in the head of what are the challenges? What are the goals of our prospects? What makes them successful? What are they doing if they don't have our solution really those, those areas that we could get into the head of our prospects. And then we talked about, okay, now, where do we fit into that? How do we make their lives better their jobs easier than more successful? And the dots just clicked a lot better and then we would do role plays and then they would have like very like a lot more organic conversations on the phone in connect calls, because they had a good understanding of the process prior to picking up the phone and like the questions were better just because they had that solid foundational understanding of what their life looked like. How important was it as an enablement leader to, you mentioned this for a second earlier, but like the alignment that you had with the other sales leaders, right? And making sure that one of the things that you're teaching are aligned with, like what they're looking for and vice versa, that you're on the same page for what a good rep looks like at a certain stage in their training and development. And then obviously at some point you're, it was a hard thing for you, but you have to pass them off to their manager and like their development then rest on their managers shoulders. But could you speak a little bit too what that relationship looks like, That is huge. And probably like looking back, that was the biggest mistake I made early on in that role, is thinking, oh, I can do this. I know I can look at the data until where deals are getting stuck in the pipeline. So, you know, if they're getting stuck in the discovery phase, then I can listen to a bunch of discovery calls and myself determine what's going wrong and do trainings around that for the team or just trying to do it all on my own. And that's what I tried to do at first, not so much because I thought I knew more than them, but more. So I didn't want to take them away from their team and I had something to prove. I wanted to prove that, hey, I can do this, I'm gonna do a great job and I can do it by myself and that was the wrong attitude to have.

And I ended up being a lot more successful once that sort of clicked and I was like, man, I really need their support. I need to make sure that the trainings that were doing with their team are aligned with their goals and that are gonna be the most impactful because any time you take a sales rep and I'm talking about like existing sales reps now on their team because we would do team trainings to on a quarterly basis and certifications and stuff. So for me, like if I'm taking them off the sales for selling and taking their valuable time, I want to ensure that it's going to make a big impact, that it's a good use of their time. So getting that commitment with the sales managers on the topics and the ideas and things that would be most valuable to them was crucial and ensuring that they are on board. So we created almost like a like an event calendar of trainings in advance and I would run the content by the sales manager to make sure that like we were an alignment on the strategies and approaches that we were teaching the reps so that they didn't get one piece of, you know, one idea when approached from me and then they get coached a completely different way and confuse them because there's a lot of different things in sales, like, as you know, tom like that could be, there's lots of different opinions on and people disagree. And one way is not necessarily better than the other, but it was really important. I found for me and their sales leader to be aligned on, okay, well, what's our a protest in town versus, well, this is Maria's approach and this is my manager's approach and now I don't know which one is better, which one I should do. So that was probably the most important thing. And if I were to go back, I would have spent a lot more time in the beginning getting to know them in their expectations and getting on like a regular cadence. Um, okay, How do we train these reps? One other big thing that we did to, for example, was create scorecards for our role plays and our certifications that not only I used in training, but that they could use in their one on one sessions when they were coaching calls. So when I was delivering feedback in training and onboarding, it was be aligned completely with what the manager was giving feedback on. So it was the same sort of sorts for cards. And I built those with the sales manager. So it wasn't just like my ideas of how it calls should be scored. It was the collective team. And did you just had a curiosity, did you do that through any technology or is just like on a google sheet or how did you do the scorecards? Yeah, I'm, I'm super old school at that time. We um, you know, I did print out pieces of paper when we were in person and I would literally just be filling them out and that's probably not the best way to do them. But yeah, we're super old school and then I think we, we got a little bit more Tuckey when the pandemic happened and we're onboarding people virtually, we moved...

...to google drive. You will die. Yeah, cutting edge, cutting edge. And now in the world of sales management, you were saying before we started that the team had just kind of split up to specialists, you know, partially an inbound, partially an outbound, you jumped at the opportunity of outbound. I'd love to hear you talk about why you prefer outbound and again, you know how you're starting to build that from the ground up for the US market, sure you really want to get me on my soapbox now because I love out. But I, you know, I tried to give that sort of passion and passed down that love and passion for Alfa found onto my team because to be honest, I don't think a lot of them have been exposed solely to outbound. Like I spent two years as a pr just outbound styling and prospecting and linked in messaging and stuff and I fell in love with the suck of it all. You know, it takes like a very interesting like glutton for pain type of sales reps able to take that every day. No, but in all seriousness though, I jumped at the chance of outbound because I think there's so much opportunity in that and for me it's a control thing, whereas I don't want to necessarily, and we have a great marketing team whose incredible and they're delivering over goal of mpls and inbound leads and so they're awesome. But for me, like I want to go after I want to be able to target accounts that reach like that are the I. C. P. Target personas. Do the research, find the people that were going to be able to help the most versus rely on just whoever is coming in and bound. And so that's always been exciting to me and it's also lead to bigger deals because you know, it's you know, more targeted and who again we can who's a better fit necessarily. And also I hate our PS and being in super competitive R. P. S where like you don't know, okay, well this competitor, they really source the opportunity and you're just getting this RFP because they need a third quote for this. And so that's always really turned me off on inbound. I like the idea of being able to eliminate a potential challenge and start going the relationship even though it is probably a longer sales process, but get in on that ground floor and start building that relationship and then when it is time to get the deal done, they must always go with you because you're the one that educated them on the problem and was there throughout it all. Yeah, there's, I mean I haven't done an RFP in a little while, but that was probably my least favorite part of sales and to your point that they always seem like they're constructed for someone. It's usually not you somehow you never have the one that's like perfectly for you and I much prefer the other way. So I'm definitely with you on that. I feel...

...like the hardest part of outbound is that right? It's that you have to educate people, but it's also a timing thing, right? Like you could find the right person that would be the perfect solution for you. But maybe they're just whether it's budgetary or for some other reason there's a major project, like it just might not be the right time. I'm curious do you have any like triggers that you coach on for like trying to find people in the right time? Because I always find from outbound finding the titles using sales and things like that. You can get contact info on zoom in for something like that. But finding the right timing, I feel like it's always been the hardest part. Yeah, I'm with you and I know that there are, there's stuff that you can use. Like I'm aware of six cents and I think there's a few others out there that can help with like intent data and I know that that would be super powerful just to get aligned on timing. But for me I haven't really, I haven't really gone there yet. Maybe in the future, but right now I'm more more focused on one trigger to that we use is job openings. So I'll look for if I'm like researching a target account, I'll look to see if they're hiring like we sell to marketing team. So I love to see if they're growing in their marketing department. I've looked on sales Navigator and their insights tab and you can see as a company, Have they grown employee count and then also depart mentally. So again we sell the marketing. So I looked up the marketing department and you can see over the last 36 12 months, what percentage has that team grown? And if you can see, Oh wow, like they've grown their marketing team 50% this year. That's a trigger of while they're investing in that area. So I wonder if there's a there's probably a reason behind that and I want to know what it is. It will help to. So I think that's one good like free trigger almost to look up. Are they hiring, are they seeing growth? And then another thing too is in our reports. So I'll control at that. Look look up their annual reports, see if like their Ceo is talking anything about girls and their sales or marketing department. And so like that's that's a huge piece of it and also helps n tailoring your message to, you know what their leadership team is saying internally there, you're going to be more likely to reach out and respond back to you. Another thing too that we've been doing not necessarily from a timing perspective, but just for a targeting and telling your message way is is looking at case studies. So we integrate with a few different types of marketing platforms and usually they're investing in those tools, they're probably a good fit for us to, or at least someone we want to talk to. So I've been pulling up those companies and looking at their case studies and my team is divided by territory like in industries. So for example, I have two reps in higher ed. So I would look for those, those success stories in higher ed for those marketing companies and...

...like this is our target list. And a lot of times they talk about their goals and what they're looking to accomplish the results, obviously how a case study is structured and that's really helpful information to have going into a call too. So you're someone that I think always has kind of like they're, you know, they're here on the ground, right? You've got the pulse of like what's going on in, in sales and just in terms of whether it might be tech or whether it might be just like new tactics, think think that people are trying or you know what, what some of the thought leaders are saying and I just feel like you're always involved in those conversations. I'm curious if there's anything that you've tried recently or that you've learned recently. Again, it could be a technology, it could be an opener to a cold call. It could be really anything. But I'm just curious if there's anything that's new that you've tried and either succeeded or failed out. Oh, thank you. Tom that's so kind to say. I mean, I try to be a part of these conversations I try to learn from from folks because we all know too, like maybe adapting and evolving to like what's the latest and not let our sales tactics to get dusty. That's probably probably my biggest fear. So one thing that I'm doing with my team especially is just ensuring that hey, I expect you to fail, I expect you to have some really awful hold dials and like I will never be upset about it if you're testing out something new and we can learn from it as a team. So I think that's number one thing that I'm trying to instill with my team, especially as we grow outbound. We're trying to find what works and like testing my assumptions as well. So I have this team that, that's really pretty awesome in that they'll disagree with me. I'll be like Maria that that assumption is bogus. Like we can't like, let's test out this way and I'll be like great semi some call recordings that go that way, prove me wrong. Like that's that's totally cool. And I always try to look back again at the data, like going data, gone labs has been awesome for that. And so that's what I go by but not necessarily like my pride of what I think was right when I, you know, made a whole bunch of cold calls three years ago. So I think just starting there, I think that's number one and then number two, yeah, I try to keep up with josh on for example, I'm might be his biggest band. He's probably great area back up a little bit. But I really love what he preaches and I think that you know what he his post every day like I sent to my team and like, oh man, let's try this. So I'm also getting back a little bit too some of becoming a curious but with cold calling with some of this stuff because now that I'm getting more Cocos as a sales leader, I'm starting to feel like, wow, this sounds super gimmicky. And that's also challenged a lot of my assumptions from the past as well because I think especially like you tom and need like calling into sales marketing leaders, they're getting a million of these calls and they're teaching their teams how to cold call and messaging and stuff. And so like the, you know, do you have the, can I...

...still 30 seconds to tell you why I called, you can hang up, this is a cold call, whatever that line is. I get that every every person that cold calls me now and it's just like, okay, I know what you're going to say next because I teach my reps to do this too. And so maybe we should go back to the drawing board and let's try to have like an organic conversation versus trying out these like gimmicky little tactics. But again, I do it myself, so I'm not in a place to judge, but but yeah, I try to be in the forefront of that, but I think you can get too wrapped up in some of those areas. And I think in the past maybe I have so I think it's always going to be testing, trying new things, challenging your own assumptions, challenging your teammates assumptions and testing things out. And I think that's the biggest thing overall when someone cold calls you, do you have the initial instinct to like coach them on it or you actually like listening and maybe considering whether or not you might want to purchase what they're buying. I feel like it's probably the former tom I feel so bad and I always take them too because it's just good like market research for me. I'm not in a position to buy anything. Like I have zero budget. I mean if there's something really powerful that we need, like I could probably bring in my sorrow and be like, hey, this is something that looks really interesting. You should take a look, but not something that's in my job description is to evaluate tools and don't have budget or any sort of power to do that. But, but I still always listen to the cold calls and if it is someone that's really good, that's done that research and has a tailor cold call. Like I'm happy to introduce them to people that do have a lot more buying power than I do. But yeah, I've said and I feel so bad. I've sent so many people feedback from Lincoln messages to quote calls, especially to quote emails before because I want them to get better. And I've been that route before two. I've made all the mistakes as a sales rep and I've been in a position to where I haven't gotten coaching and I've been like, this is okay for me to send this email and it's really not okay. But no one told me that it wasn't. So I try to like deliver that feedback when I have time when I can lightly and and to try to make them better because if they're part of my sales community to, I want us to get better as a profession. So I try if I have time to give feedback, but it's probably annoying for them. No, I think if anything, it's encouraged, it breaks up like all of the, there's so much fear that can go into a cold call and might be anxious and might be dreading it and all that stuff. So if anyone, you know obviously that the ideal is you set a meeting or you know, get the next step book. But I think the next best cases like someone is at least nice to you and maybe they offer you a tip or something like that. Like if I was cold calling, I would, I would take that all day long. So I figured that would be something that you, that you would do. Yeah, there is actually an SDR who was, I was so impressed by from another tech company. She messaged me on linkedin and to be honest on it,...

...what I won't say the name of the company, but it wasn't a great message. It was very, probably focused. It was very much like, hey, are you looking for a tool like this? This is what we do every day back. And I'm like, no, we're good. We have to have, you know, this toll. And she responded right away and she was like, hey, I knew it. This, I'm an SDR, I just started like a few months ago and new to sales. Like, what feedback would you give me? And I wrote paragraphs and like I'm here if you need me, it's like you want to talk through this more if you want a role play. And I've had conversations with her now and so like, I love that. I mean that's, that's super fulfilling to me and someone, I was just really impressed by her asking for feedback afterwards when her messaging didn't land and hopefully obviously she didn't get a sale with me, but hopefully she got something that's more valuable and in the future her messaging will resonate a lot better with her prospects. Wow, I love that move, love that movie. All right. I got two more questions for you before we head off. So first of all, obviously we're on the Pavilion podcast. Um, and so I always like to ask folks whether it's within that this community or just In general, like what is your number one networking tip professionally? It's a good question. Tom networking tips. I think, you know, we go into it and I was guilty of this too. And I'm actually teaching like a sales navigator classes. We just got it for my whole team this week. I think it salespeople with the pressure of quotas and things like that. We can go into networking with the wrong intentions with like we're going to hit my number, I got to make something now of this relationship. And so that's, that's what I would say is my biggest tip is to go into any of these connections. Like you're meeting someone at the bar that's like a friend of a friend, like you wouldn't directly ask them to buy whatever software, bet you have more to take a meeting with you or to get coffee with you in your first a couple of seconds, meeting them right, That will never happen. So I think my biggest networking tip would be to treat our like internet interactions like we would have in person to try to just make a lot more organic think about long term like relationship of like how can I genuinely help this person versus how can they help me or how can, who can they introduced me to? And that's what I would say. And I think at the end of the day, you'll get a lot more in return out of it by approaching all of your relationships and that sort of way versus how can they help me? Couldn't agree more. My last question for you, who in the Pavilion Network should be coming on this podcast next? So many people? I could go, I would say, and you're a hoe that she was a mentor of mine or is a mentor of mine and she's...

...doing some really interesting things. She just started her own podcast as well. And she taught me so much, not only about sales enablement, but about how to be a leader, and how to almost think of how to prepare for a meeting. Or she helped look over my business review when I got the job at Rock content and she helped me prepare and did it all behind the scenes. She got no or your athletes or anything on linkedin. I think I wrote like I told her thank you on linkedin publicly, but she didn't really get anything from it, the better event from the goodness of her heart. But she is an incredible leader and leads by example. So I think that that would be a, a great person to talk to and what, what's her podcast called? I forget off the top of my head. She just tell people to find it. Yeah, but she is awesome and she's a great leader and everyone, including myself has a lot to work with her. Awesome. Well, she'll be coming on, Maria, Maria ross, the boss. I always appreciate you sharing your wisdom and your thoughts. What would be the best place for people to reach out if they want to learn from, you connect with you try to sell to you whatever, whatever it might be sure. Message me on linkedin, I connect with literally everyone that sends me a request. I love having conversations and learning from the sales community, whether you're an SDR, your rep, your manager, I have something to learn from all of you. So I would love to connect and certain conversations also hiring from my sales team. So if you're big on the outbound side, I would love to have a conversation with you and and see if you can be thought and successful at constant awesome. Great, thanks so much for coming on Maria. Thanks Tom I appreciate it. All right, Thanks for checking out that episode. This was brought to you by drift, the new way businesses by from businesses. You can learn more and get the conversation started at drift dot com. I'll be back next week until then, get after it. Have fun again. Hit me up on linkedin. My name is Tom Alamo and work over at dawn until next monday. Get after a piece. Say something. Mhm.

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