The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 2 months ago

Ep 163: The Solo-preneur Leap of Faith w/ Matt Heinz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 163/: The Solo-preneur Leap of Faith w/ Matt Heinz 

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to thePavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon martin and you're listening toIs this a good time? The show where I put Pavilion members on the hot seatfor 15 minutes. We hear their incredible stories. We really showsTuesdays and thursday, so hit subscribe. So you don't miss hearing from ourexperts. Our guest today is Matt Heinz. He's the president of Heinz Marketingand man, if you don't know about Madame linkedin, then you are missing out. Wetalk a lot about his moment of being a solo preneurs and that leap of faiththat he took this month sponsors Sandoz. So Sandoz, so the leading sendingplatform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand outwith new ways to engage. It struck strategic points throughout thecustomer journey by connecting with digital and physical strategies.Companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than everbefore. All right, let's do this episode 80. Is this a good time? Allright, everyone's super excited to have our guest today, Matt Hines, he is thepresident of Heinz Marketing, obviously his own marketing firm, Matt you'veprobably seen on linkedin. He's a thought leader for everything relatedto marketing, Digital marketing B two B marketing. Uh matt educate us today,man, this is gonna be fun. No pressure, right? Yeah, yeah, no, I mean, all thepressure, come on, you're you're in the frying pan. This is uh we we go we goright into it. Look, I'll meet no Phil I want to get into the questions. Tellme about, you know, your current role, what are you doing? You you've beenconsulting essentially for, you know, over 10 years and how you got here?Yeah, good question. So um matt Hines, founder President Heinz Marketingstarted this about 13 years ago with no intention other than just be aconsultant helping companies dr B two B marketing and you know, it's just me, abus bus pass and a laptop. And that's not an analogy, that's a real that wasthe first few days and months of that they were in the business. We've grownsince then helping companies throughout north America build more predictablepipeline, really helping them be helping marketing teams become betterrevenue generators for the business and...

...to create more sustainable, predictableprofitable pipeline for the organization's definitely not what Iintended to do when I started my career. I'm a journalism and political sciencemajor from the University of Washington. My first job out of school, I was areporter for a local newspaper covering state government, do all through highschool and college and then got into it and kind of had this moment where like,I don't know that this is what I want to do for the rest of my career. So Iwent to a pR firm start at the very bottom, went to Microsoft a littlewhile, rand marketing and a couple startups and eventually started this.So um definitely been an interesting journey along the way, but I've enjoyedit. What's this, what was the spark give me the spark I mean because youknow I like the idea that you did the Microsoft thing you got to detect, thenyou got into startups and said, hey, you know I think a lot of people, maybeeven in the past couple years pandemic related, whatever saying oh what I dofor start ups, I can do for lots of startups and scale myself a little bit,you know, I think I I think of you know some of the folks that have been onlike Justin and so forth, people that are becoming solo preneurs right in away, this is 22,000 and eight I think when you started, what was the sparkfor that? Well it was November 2008 wouldn't market it just marketed justtanked. Um you know my wife is pregnant with our first child, so no time likethe present, right? I mean I think, look there are three things in my life,at least three things in my life that if I would have waited until I wasready, I never would have done get married, have kids, start a business,truth be told, I'm not ready for any of those right now. Um but you knowsometimes you just got to take a leap of faith and I think for me, you know Iwas a consultant literally didn't need anything more than a laptop and a buspass. I had two clients that basically said, if you will quit your job andactually do this thing, you keep talking about, we would hire you rightaway. They followed through on that, it was just me, right? So it was, it waseasy to get going and I had no intention of growing a business, soeven though now, much bigger payroll, like got all the things, it didn'tstart that way, and we've been able to...

...grow organically to get into that. Thatsaid, you bring up an interesting point that there's a, there's a book byMichael Gerber called the E myth, and usually when you're in front ofsomething that stands for electronic, right? In this case it did not. The emyth is the entrepreneur myth, and his point is that just because you're goodat something doesn't mean you can run a business about it, right? Just becauseyou're a great baker, just because you make great cakes, doesn't mean youwould be successful running a bakery. You know, the act of running a businessis different than the act of being good at what you do, right, and you have todo that plus other things to be successful, even in a small business,and I've met many people that are really good at various things wherethey could be consultants and they're great at that work, but either hate orare bad at the back office, you know, you've got me as a, as a consultant,like you're always prospecting, you're always building pipeline for the future,You have to get your bills paid, which means following up on stuff that's notfor everybody. But part of the business. Let me ask you, give us a sense of thescale of things from when you started till now. I mean I bet you, everyonehas seen some post of yours on linkedin. You have a lot of great thoughts and,and, and thought leadership that you put out there and so, you know, I, Iimagine that your, your company is growing like crazy. But can you give asense of that scale? Yeah, I mean we're probably smaller than people think likewe're 16 people right now as we record this in October 2021. You know, we'vegot clients sort of all over North America. Our team is mostly here inwestern Washington. We just do most of our work remotely. But when I startedagain, just me again laptop and bus pass, no money completely bootstrapped.I didn't have other than my network. I didn't have, you know, uh, sort ofplaces to go, generate leads. But I'm like, hey, I was trained as a reporter.I can write, I can't do a lot of things well, but I can write. So I started ablog. I started a newsletter and started trying to generate insights onsocial channels, not doing anything other than well. If I can leave a papertrail of the things I think about. If people that need help with something,see that I've got some interesting...

...things to say about those things and ifthey agree with me or disagree. But like the way I think maybe that givesme credibility to eventually get a, you know, a solo gig, you know, doing someconsulting with them. That's how that all started. Then you just by doingthat every day for 13 years, you develop an interesting body of work.And so I think, you know, we were now like we literally next month we'llcelebrate 13 years in business. We just earlier this year hard, our very firstvisit every person we've never had someone in a biz dev capacity in thebusiness. I think in part because we've been able to generate an interestinginbound and referral engine from a lot of the content we've gone and createdand there's no secret sauce to this, right? I mean there's no like there wasno grand vision of this grand master plan to build a content machine fromthe early days. It was, it was out of necessity. Yes. Finding prospects and,and, and sort of feed myself and my family and then it's just been a lot ofconsistency. I mean I literally have, it used to be laminated when I traveledmore like I call it my daily do list and it's everything from networkconnections to follow ups to content creation and curation, it's doing thebasics on a consistent daily basis. It builds into something interesting. Yeah,it's incredible. I always, I aspired to get there myself. Not that I probablyhave enough interesting things to say, but that's what everyone who does thissays, just keep writing, keep writing, keep writing. And I'm always fearfulthat it would take hours and hours because I don't, I'm not a trainedwriter. Is that the way you feel? Is it something that takes more than a halfhour day? Well it can, if you want it to, it depends on what you're doing,right? I mean if you, if you want to write a book, it's gonna take a while.It's not only going to take an awful lot of your time, but it's going totake, you gotta be really premeditated about what you're gonna do. And so thattakes time. Let's say you're not a writer, but you know, you still haveopinions on things like start a podcast, do some linkedin lives. Like put somevideos up on instagram. I mean like literally like just one person, oneperson is good at from a format or a...

...form standpoint might not be what youdo. Like, I mean, and one on one hand, I love that, I've got sort of a lotmore video options now that we're sort of more remote so that I can actuallycreate connections with people, but ran and you're looking at me, I got a facefor radio. So doing written stuff where people didn't have to look at me was myjam. So I think, you know, I'm still, I I can have an idea on something and puttogether some copy pretty quickly. Like that's part of it is just the trainingpart of it's just having done it for forever. And you know, Mark Twain oncesaid if I'd had more time, I would have written a shorter letter. So there'ssomething to be said for the fact that you give something more time, youcreate a more efficient, more effective piece of communication. There's alsosomething to be said for like get yourself in the habit. I mean, I don't,every one of us is going through the day, subconsciously creating opinionsabout or reacting to the things we see around us and all. The only differencebetween, you know, folks that aren't creating a lot of content and folksthat are, is that they have trained themselves to see the world around themas content sources. I mean literally take a post it note right now and writeon it. What's my response to this? How do I feel about this? Right. Anythingyou experience, especially in your sphere of influence in the work youwant to do. What's your reaction to what just happened? What's yourreaction or opinion on what you just saw like that will create a neverending source of content options for you. That's, that's a great piece ofadvice. Love it. Well, let's, let's, let's keep going. You've certainlydemonstrated and talked to us a little bit about the hard work that it took toget to where you are, any instances of kind of luck and chance that haveallowed you to grow, you know, and any anyone you want to bring out now. Yeah,I would say, you know, for me it's, you know, I grew up in a family from themidwest, um, that taught me to just kind of put your heart head on everyday, stay humble, do the work support and prioritize others, you know, I tryto honor, you know, my, my parents and my dad passed a couple years ago, wetried to sort of continue to honor him and sort of how he taught me to sort ofwork and to just be humble and get the...

...job done and shine a light on others.So I think some of that is for sure. The way I've learned, I would say thatI've had some great mentors along the way. People I've learned from people Icontinue to learn from that have been either doing it a lot longer than Ihave or just have a really great approach, not just to the work, but tolife. I've been, I would say I've been really lucky to for last 78 years beena part of a group called e. O. Short for entrepreneur organization. Okay,it's a bunch of founders and entrepreneurs of mostly sort of smallto medium sized businesses that you know that all realize that we're allmaking this up as we go and then, you know, running a business and also sortof being an entrepreneur is work life challenges, ups and downs all the time.So to be able to share to to share experiences and to share advice witheach other and to get motivation and um advice from that group has beenenormous and then quite frankly, as we have grown to put a focus on people andto put a focus on purpose, you know, we are very big. I mean again we're a verysmall company, this is our footprint in the world is very small, but thatdoesn't mean that for those people in the company, for their, for theirfamilies, for their communities, we can't create something interesting, wecan't create something that's beyond just the work. Like I firmly believelike we can do things that change, not just how marketing is perceived and howmarketing operates and organizations, but change the impact that has oncareers and lives and starting with our own right. And so, you know, that'sthat's been a really, it's been a humbling and exciting part of growing abusiness and have being in a position to be able to impact some of thoseelements of the job. Yeah, I love that man, that's awesome. Well look, youprobably have 1000 of these but and I know you put up, you know, you put aton out there, but give us a tactic that you feel like has been workinglately that you want to pass on to the world. So uh what comes to mind is sortof the continued sort of, you know, playing with the Lincoln algorithm andI'm getting, you know, everyone wants...

...to post a survey because Lincoln lovestheir surveys and so everyone's gonna serve because that drives traffic, yougot to pump the brakes a little bit on frequency that. But what I have noticedthough, and Lincoln is probably gonna go change now is that if you postsomething and simply put an image into your linkedin post, Lincoln alsoapparently likes images and I am terrible at remembering this when I domy linkedin posts. So you won't see a lot with images. But those, I have putit, there's something about the image of Lincoln says, oh we're going to thismust be a good one, we're going to go expose this to a lot more people. So ifyou're using linkedin as I thought leadership channel, I mean, go get ashutter stock account, get some cheap, put images and just throw them up thereand I bet you see an acceleration of impact growth. Hacking man, I like theSeymour button, the all those little tips. I love it one more. I will giveyou though, just on professional development. Um for those of you thatsort of like to read books, but don't always feel like you have time to readbooks. A little company called blink kissed. You can got a subscription toit. Remember of Cliff notes, like when you were in high school, you didn'twant to read Macbeth, so you got the Cliff Notes, whatever. Yeah, so I readum so you know, so, and then you get older and then you've got the executivebook summaries, right? Like someone read lee Iacocca's, you know, sort ofmemoir and here's the gist of it. Think of blink, it's like the executive booksummaries, but in podcast form, Oh listen to short summaries of thehighlights of business sales, marketing, leadership books and you can throw thaton 1.5 speed too. Right? So even though I'm too old for that, I got like theproblem with that is if it's a 1.5 speed I have, I have to be payingattention to it. And usually if I'm listening to these, I'm driving, I'mworking out, I'm kind of distract, I'm doing yard work, I'm distracted so I, Ineed to take my time or else it's just gonna be one, anyone you're out. Allright, I like that. I, there's sometimes I gotta slow down. SometimesI have to speed up the podcast. Sometimes I gotta slim down dependingon who's who's the orator, So cool man, well look, any, any positions you'rehiring for, you know, 16 people are you...

...growing? We are absolutely growinghiring this, you know, 2020 was an interesting year. This year hasdefinitely been a growth here for us. We have, you know, we at this point wehave sort of a 10 year vision of where we think we're going to go. We've got athree year blueprint of what we think, what we more specifically want to hit.And we've got, you know, moderate but real growth funds next year. So you'realways looking for smart consultants, always looking for people who arepassionate about B two B marketing at Varian various functions, but alsopassionate about changing how that is run and perceived in organizations,right? We don't need to be the arts and crafts department, We don't need to besubservient to sales, we need an equal place at the revenue and leadershiptable. And I think marketing and chief market officers can really sort ofdrive, understanding, understanding addressable market and drive go tomarket performance moving forward. So if anyone's passionate about that, youknow, at all levels the organization, we're looking for good people love it,love it awesome. And uh any shout outs of people that you appreciate kind ofthe content they put up or you know, oh man, you know, there, there are so manypeople that I look at and I think as a marketer I would say that you know Itend to gravitate towards sales content more these days. So I said like youknow find the places where you know as I think of us as full funnel marketersand we need to better understand and speak the language of sales. Soshoutout to Trish Bertuzzi at the bridge group is producing great content,Laurie Richardson who not only sort of just great selling inside sales contentbut just as a huge advocate for women in sales at all levels Jill Konrath,one of the O. G. S. Of sales strategy. I used to get to see her more oftenthan I do now and just really missing her and then I think about just peoplejust people that not only are authors and speakers but also just read andpublish on a regular basis. Um Mike Weinberg, Anthony ian Dory, no MarkHunter, Jeb Blount keenan you know there's some just really great salesvoices out there and God bless the world we live in right now. I mean likeyou can buy their books but you can also listen and watch and read them allfor free. You know there are this feeds...

...and stuff. So yeah just constantlytrying to learn more about you know if you're in marketing you're not spendingactive amount of time sitting with your sales team or getting into the head ofhouse sales operates it is a hard hard job and you're not going to have a lotof credibility and aligning with them unless you truly understand how theywork. Yeah, that's great. Like that's a that's a murderer's row of people to belistening to you. But I mean if you're listening and you just start listeningand reading from some of the folks that was just mentioned there from Trish allthe way down, man. You're gonna learn a lot in a short period of time. I'lltell you that, but put it into practice. All right, well look, that's foreverybody else. This is for me where we eat and give me a restaurant. We thatthat's, you know, a favorite of yours that maybe people don't know about.Right? So there are so I have a top three list of the best meals I've hadin my life. Okay, so one of them is Gramercy Tavern in midtown Manhattan. Iwent there with my I was in an agency back in the day and we took a clientthere and it was one of those five hour dinners. I can't imagine ever having abetter dinner. It was just amazing. So there's that's one too, is, I don'tremember the name of it, but it's a it's a burger basket place in HamiltonMontana. We were there for work related thing. It's about an hour south ofMissoula. We were doing something up in sort of like this vacation rental place.We were starving when we came back off the hill. We found this place in town.It was like $5 burger basket with like it was just, it was the best hamburgerI think I've ever had, wow for the name of it. But Hamilton Montana find theburger basket place and the third, the third continues to rotate. Like thosetwo are like up here, right? And then so down here, number three, the current,the current on the list is the house of prime rib in san Francisco Brandon.They serve one thing and one thing, it's prime rib, right? And they havefive, there's five things on the menu because there's, there's like a bigpiece of prime rib, obscene piece of prime rib. Prime rib that should takeyou a month to eat. Like they actually have in the corner of the menu. Theyhave a fish special. I think that's...

...just for show. I don't think they'veever bought a fish in the entire existence of the restaurant and thenall the exits, right? All the fixings. So you go there, you have to fast forfour days and just know that you're gonna have to really watch yourcholesterol level for the next six months. But phenomenon, I love it. Ilove, we're going to find this place, we're gonna find this burger spot. ButI love that. I love that. I used to work for Danny meyer. So I love theGramercy is your number one. Uh Gramercy is an incredible place, mat,it's so great to have you on appreciate you. And uh you're looking forward tocontinuing, you know, to keep up on your stuff. I just I love I lovereading what you put out. I appreciate that. Thanks for the opportunity. Allright. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If youlove the show, write review apple podcast, Spotify Senate to friends. Iknow many of you listen and don't do that. Just go do that. Take fiveminutes. Come on. Now, reminder this episode was brought to you by santos.So they deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physicalimpressions that make your outreach more personal. I had a lot of fun today.I hope you did too. Now get out there. Pressure numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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