The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Ep 191: The Helsinki Software Scene w/ Paul Arpikari

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 191: The Helsinki Software Scene w/ Paul Arpikari

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

But hello everyone and welcome back to the pavilion podcast. I am your host, brand of our and you are listening to is this a good time? The show? I pupe a billion members on the hat sea. For fifteen minutes. We hear their incredible stories. New in two thousand and twenty two here and we're going to stop saying this, but it is what it is. We really shows every Thursday, no longer on Tuesdays, just Thursday, so hit subscribe. Don't miss hearing from our experts. Our guests today is coming to us from Helsinki, Paul Ar Picari. He's the CECO and partner of Self Forte. We talked about the software scene in Helsinki and Finland and all the growth that he's had. Pretty cool episode. This month sponsor is six. Six N, so the number one account engagement platform helps you identify accounts that are in market for your solution, prioritize your efforts, engage buyers the right way with highly relevant messaging and measure what actually matters. With the six N platform, you are able to get into more deals, improve when rates increase, overall pipeline and optimize budget spent. To learn more, visit...

...six Centscom all R let's see this episode ninety three. This is a good time. All right. I am here today with Paul our Percari. He is the CECO, the chief commercial officer and a partner at Self Forte, one of US small but growing chapter members in Helsinki. Paul, great to have you on and thanks so much for joining us. Thanks and thanks for thanks for having me. Great to be here and, yeah, nice to lift up the flag of helps and kid chapter. Yeah, for sure. Well, look, I'll me no pillow. Want to jump right into to the questions. Tell us about you know what I want to do? Two things. I want to hear about you and your career. But when we go to some of these places in the world that we don't hear a lot from, tell us about what's going on in Helsinki, in the startup world, the SASS world, the software world. But start with you, start with your career. How did you get to where you are? Bring us all the way back to, you know, some of the experiences that you had early on. Yeah. Thanks. So in now with self forth, about three years now. So so forth its Sauce Company for marketing and effectiveness...

...and helping the consumer brands to measure marketing effect on revenue. So I ended up here from media and marketing industry. That I've been about fifteen years now, working for a TV company earlier in my career, then on online media business, started my own business, failed and then found a mid the founder of sell forth, that about three and a half years ago. It's a consulting work. Work there and joined the team about team three years ago and then being fell in love with the sauce business and and how this runs the world. Any will eat up the world. Yeah, for sure. Tell us a little bit about the differences between selling media or selling in the world of TV and selling Sass, I mean from your perspective. Yeah, it's so different. It's so different. I didn't even understand how different it is. In media world you have kind of quite simple products. I would say...

...it's easy to sell the there's a set budgets for those kind of media, media budgets, so the deals happen quickly and you don't need multiple stakeholders. And as we're selling to enterprise and process solutions for mid market and enterprise segment. So it's as you know, it's multiple stakeholders, long sales cycles, and you need also a lot of people from your own team to sell sale that technically and business. Why? So bake big differences. Yeah, yeah, and what advice would you give to people that are making that transition into software sales? Is there? Is there something that kind of made a click for you along the way? Well, I think there's so much potential in software business. As mentioned earlier. It's eating up the world the services, services that we've typically bought as consulting or similar ways of gathering data and showing, analyzing, whatever it is. It has huge potentials and I don't know,...

...it's easy to scale the business internationally and I yeah, I would just say that jump on it because it's I think it's come somehow. You can work with the bigger team and it's you learn much more. I was saying. Yeah, yeah, and you mentioned there that you had you started your own business and it failed. Yes, talk a little bit about that. We you know, not a word that we often hear people saying. I really appreciate the idea that you can say, Hey, this didn't work out. Just time. Maybe talk about what what didn't work and what you might have done differently. So what was the business person all yeah, I created an online market place for B to be businesses and started that back in two thousand and eighteen. Yeah, already. Of course we didn't have too much resources, but also I don't think we focused enough on the customer pains and customer problems, that we thought we knew it all, kind of been working on online market place. We thought we knew the problems and made a lot...

...of assumptions and didn't do our research properly. And Yeah, yeah, I think that was the conclusion that. Of course they are multiple reasons, but I think I would enhance the fact that you should focus on the customer current solution, how they're fixing the problem currently and is it a problem that occurs enough often that it is a big if it's a big problem and if it's all the time present. So those two factors and I love it. Thanks for sharing that. I mean it's on a often or easy to go back and say, Hey, here's, here's something that we did wrong, but you clearly have landed on your feet in your current role. Before we move on to some of the other questions, you know, I would love for you to give us a sense of either the startup world or the or this is the SASS world. What's going on in in Helsinki's kind of business engine yeah, so of course, if I talk about kind of Finland with generally we have a lot of engineers and we haven't been that good of a marketers...

...when we go do a kind of doing consumer brands. But I think now that we're entering into the world of software, we are seeing that the engineering minded people in Finland they're actually very good at creating great product. So I think this sauce era, I would call it, will be beneficial to Finland and other counters around us, like Sweden and Estony, where you have great engineers and will building great products. So I think there's a kind of a hot startup. Seeing in Helsinki a lot of great companies coming out of here, for example volt or or robbe or angry birds or companies like super super metrics. So that's a lot of good things happening here. And does that mean that there's more investment dollars coming that way as well? Is Yeah, places like London or even Germany or yeah, a lot of a lot of the investments have been flowing into a Helsinki area. We have good investors here, but we have gotten good in vestments from from UK, from Germany and,...

I think, all over the world, if I'm not mistaken. So definitely a heating up startup. Seeing in here in health taket. Love it. I will look. We always talk about both luck and hard work being something to get you to where you are in your career. You know, would love to hear a story from either, from your past, that is kind of helped you to land a sea sweet position. Yeah, and I kind of think that luck could be something that actually is the end results of hard work. I'd so. I think it kind of goes hand in hand, right. I found myself in this position due to the hard work and maybe you can call it luck, but I call it also hard work and I believe that the luck will happen to the people who are curious and is willing to do the work. So typically good things happen in those kind of people. Work my ass off in the media industry and try to serve my customers as well as could, and that landed me a job in online business,...

...where I started as a first sales manager job back in two thousand and four theme, and that was mainly because I think my customer back in the days fell in love with how I'm selling and how that could be transformed into a selling it our sales team that he he saw building for that company. So and working there. I don't see any other patterns than working with the entrepreneurial mindset and always willing to commit that to a target. Yeah, I think that that might be some of the key elements that you can differentiate quite a lot in the industry by saying it, I can do it, actually not saying like M'M I don't know, but thinking that I can, I will do it, I will do that and commit to that target. So that will take you so much further. Will you mentioned you got introduced to the founder of Cell for day. How did that happened? was that, you know, friend of a friend or kind of how do you make an introduction like that? Well, I actually participated when I was building my own...

...company. I participated these kind of prefounder weekend that we had in Finland by by one seed stage investor, icebreaker, and it is a great place where they teach becoming entrepreneurs and founders. How is to find the product market, feed and what kind of team you should be building. How to focus on the DOMAINE expertise. So I was there to learn right and the founders, tell Forte, was presenting what they have been doing for the first year, when they got their presede investment, and how they're started to build the team. So I was like listening, Hey, I'm here to put my own company, but I actually fell in love with your problem and your vision. So that's to talk to with the founder. And here we are landed at first of our consulting job and then I offer for a chief commercial officer. So love it, love it. That sounds fairly lucky itself. Well, look, I'm along the way. I'm sure you picked up a ton of...

...different tactics. What something that you know, a marketing tactic that that or sales tactic that you've used that you want others to know about that they could, you know, potentially put into their repertoire? Well, we are still early stage company. We have tried different kind of things. Earlier I've been also responsible for the marketing part of our operations. So we've doing, we have been doing, quite a lot of stuff, and my advice is to start investing early on your brand. That will help along so much, so much so we have tested out different kind of taxtic tactics on digital marketing and and how to get people on with these bots to engage with you and different kind of things, but at least for this meat market and enterprise space, it hasn't helped us too much. There has been some engagement, some leads, but nothing kind of bake. So I would say the branding is focused it on early stage. It will help you out in so many things.

Love that. Love that. and Are you hiring? You making it hire soon? We you want to put out there in the world? Yeah, all the time, I would say. But the most important I would say now that we're looking to land, he's the is, if the our team lead. So we haven't done a lot of project development on the own stale protests and quality, but it's also numbers game, so we need also opportunities generated. So it's ther team lead. Is probably something that we will start hiring and during spring. All right, good, well, we'll put that out there now. All Right, anybody that you want to give a shout out to that you know, you find you know, inspiring or you find their content to be something that that you look forward to hearing about and learning from. Well, yeah, somehow I'm fell in love with their gong stuff and how they market their brand and their souce business. So shout out to marketing team of Gong and how they utilize SK insights in their marketing and branding.

So maybe that that is my thing I want. I want to say out loud I love it, man. Well, I mean everyone talks about how Gong is the the goat for content and both the strategy that they take, but also just in general this stuff that they put out there. So that makes sto sense. Cool. And last but not these most probably most important to me, give me a restaurant. It's got to be. It's got to be. I'm not going to let you off the hook. You gotta give me something in Finland as well as something from around the globe. But where's a little spot that you want to give us, you know, a tidbit on? Yeah, I was thinking about recently. I will traditionaldorf. So I want to say out loud that PSYCHOVENIAN DISTALDORF, Italian restaurant, the best, but also, of course, popping and fail on. That's a kind of a restime scene is rising up. But I want to say Asian Asian restaurants and specially fun if you come to Helsinki or any of these...

...these new Asian restaurants that we have recently here. So shout out to those. Those guys cool, love it, man. Well, Paul, so great to have you on. Exciting to hear about all this going on in he'll sinky and with you and I'm excited to check back and like a year and we can see how how the hell Sinki chapters grown to be such a, you know, a huge force in northern Europe. Man, absolutely, and yeah, thank you for having me. That is our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, rate, review, apple podcast, spotify, send it to some friends, send me a note, tell me it's great, tell me it's sucks, either way and, of course, masses, subscribe button, because that's what you will do. This episode was brought to you by six sense, powered by AI and predictive analytics. Six sense helps you unite your entire revenue team with a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue growth. I had fun today. Hope you did too. Now get out their crushing numbers.

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