The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 6 months ago

Ep 161: The Creator Economy w/ Justin Welsh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 161: The Creator Economy w/ Justin Welsh

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

All right, welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. This is the podcast where revenue leaders come to learn about the tips, the tricks, the tactics that can make them successful in their roles. I'm your host Tom a lame O T G I? M thank God it's monday, excited to get into today's episode before we do that. Let's give a quick shout out to our sponsor, sponsoring. Today's episode is Sandoz. So Sandoz so the leading sending platform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey. By connecting digital and physical strategies. Companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than ever before. So definitely show some love to our friends at sentosa. Can also learn more. I post every single day on linked in my name is Tom Alamo, you can learn more about me there. All right today, I've got an interview with the Justin. Welch, you likely know this man, he actually helped to create this podcast years ago, cut his teeth in the healthcare sales sass world that dot dot grew up to be the S V P N C R O a patient pop About a year or two ago he left that role and got into creating his own company so he does a lot of different things. He creates amazing courses. He builds audience on linkedin. He's a strategic advisor to, you know, dozens of different company. He's a member of the go to Market fund. He co founded the audience income community, which is helping other people get up and coming into their length in games so we talked all about the creator economy and what Justin thinks about. He's one of the people that I look up to most in that space I think is a forward looking guy. Super smart, super strategic and tactical. So we get into high level questions about what where the creator economy is going, what it is, what it's all about and even get into tactical about how he sets up his different side businesses. So I think you're really going to enjoy this one without further ado let's get straight into my conversation with Justin all right the O. G. Pavilion podcast host Justin Welch how are you Ben, I'm doing great how are you doing man? I am I'm doing well I survived Q. Three we're on to the next quarter. I'm feeling like £100 has been lifted from my back so I'm feeling good right now. Congratulations. I I remember those days very fondly so it's it's funny having not been in it for a while like I had a call with someone the other day I was like oh yeah it is the end of Q. Three like um why why why do we have a meeting on the books you should be, you should be selling but yeah congratulations that's awesome. Yeah I imagine your whole like timetable of life has changed from being an S. V. P. Of sales or C. R. O. To being you know an entrepreneur it's just like you don't care about months or quarters or I mean you do but about the revenue in your business but you don't have those specific timetables where you're trying to necessarily hit these these goals. That's right. It's um you know I definitely like keep track of how I'm doing every month and like how my quarters are growing quarter over quarter like those are definitely things I look at but you're right, it's interesting like some days I'm like what day is this? Is it like Wednesday like so I like what what what month is it, what what quarter is it, what what week is it? I I lose track of time a lot not having that like sort of rigid you know performance schedule that I had at patient pop but it's good it's free. Yeah and you know obviously anyone that's been following you for the last you know probably two years knows that you're one of if not the spearhead around the creator economy in the B two B sas world and I'm a believer in that and you know what the moment was that like clicked for me and it has nothing to do with B two B or SAS or sales but it was the Floyd Mayweather Logan paul or jake paul whichever whichever brother was fight that happened like six months ago and I...

...was like this Kid is like 23, He's he's fought like one person before And he just was famous for YouTube and reality shows and things like that and all of a sudden he throws in like a $10-$20 million dollar payday for having like kind of a fake fight with a retired boxer and I'm like, man, that was just all from, that was not the craft, that was all from just building an audience and adding value in his own way and being able to leverage that to all these other crazy opportunities totally Well, welcome to the free market creator economy, right? Where like expertise and, and we can, we can, we can go down a huge rabbit hole and like we can argue about whether it's important to have expertise, but it's just, it's an attention economy, right? It's who can get the most attention and how can you leverage that attention to, you know, develop unique revenue streams and I don't know anything about that guy because I'm, you know, I'm not in that in that particular world, but obviously he's done a really good job making a lot of money, making a lot of noise, creating a lot of attention and turning it into some income for himself. But it's interesting like everyone has an opportunity to do that and that's not everyone is jake paul or Logan paul or whoever, you know, is the most famous of the two of them, but, but everyone has, everyone has the option to go out there and to create some noise and to create some attention and and you leverage that attention into some into some nice income and some people do it on the side of their full time job and other folks do it until suddenly it becomes their full time job. And I think that's I think studying that's a lot of fun and I think watching it happen in real time, it's just really interesting. So I love it. Do you think this is a trend that continues to grow as quickly as it feels like it's grown so much in the last few years? Like the amount of people that are doing side consulting courses, you pick, you're kind of like side hustle strategy or even going full entrepreneurial like you Do you feel like 10 years from now it's gonna be Just like 10 X what it is today or how do you see this growing as an economy moving forward? I do. And I'll preface this by saying, I'm certainly no expert in what's going on with like web 3.0 and N. F. T. S and all that stuff. I'm not super deep into to that stuff. So I'll preface it when I say, I'll say that before I dive in here, but I think it's only going to get more wild and more complicated. I think distribution is wide open. You know, it used to be that in order to become someone famous for broadcasting, had to be on television now, that's podcasting, right? And I think used to have to be an artist, you have to land in land your exhibit in an art museum or a store or used to have to go to a major city and now that's turning into N. F. T. S. And digital art and everyone has access to creating art. I think that what you're going to see is just sort of diversified access, meaning like everybody in every city across the world, as long as they have an internet connection, has an opportunity to create significant income through their artistry and through what they create. And I love that and I think there's like I think it continues to grow because people it seems like everyone is doing it but that's not true. A very small percentage of people are actually creating, turning that attention into income and we call those people lots of names, you know, influencers gurus create like whatever pick your, pick your name, right? But the interesting point is everyone on the continuum on the spectrum right of where they're at in their career, has some value to offer to someone behind them in their career. I don't care if you're an entry level str I don't care if you are you know, director of sales, you have value to add to people who have not yet figured out that journey. And as soon as that clicks with people as soon as they unlock that, they recognize like, oh, I don't have to be a quote unquote expert. I don't have to be a, you know, the best in the world at what I do. I have to be better than a few 1000 other people. And as soon as you realize that like this whole theory of, can I...

...actually bring those folks along with me on a journey and monetize that It becomes a lot easier to understand and accept? And so I think that's going to continue to grow as more and more people are raised on the Internet. Like I didn't have it when I was until I was like 15. Right? So I think the whole generation, you know below me is gonna be just blow people like me out of the water. Yeah, I'm curious. I feel like I see a lot of content around. How do you get started right? Uh if you're interested in this world, and I feel like I see a lot around and I've talked to people in this podcast around, okay, consulting is a pretty easy channel to dip your toes in, especially if you have a lot of experience and maybe you're going to turn that into a full time business if you're sick of the corporate world. But what do you say to the people that are maybe in between that have been doing this, you know, playing this game on the side for the last 1 to 3 years maybe they're making some small income, nothing close to what they are in a full time O. T. E. It's it's probably not enough to leave their job and have the same lifestyle that they have today and like maybe hit that like what Seth Godin would call the dip where it's just like man is my plateau diseases just not like taking off like I thought it would is that a common thing that you see two people that you're advising and connecting with or or maybe not? Yeah it's super common. I think the way that people think about building side income is often the reverse of how I might recommend they think about it and just because I recommend it by the way it doesn't mean it's right, it's just how I think about it. But most people say like I'm going to do x, I'm going to be a consultant coach advisor, whatever whatever your your choices and then they go all in on that and they go really hard and they hope it works and often it works but not to the extent they thought it would. So they were hoping to make you know let's just call it 100 K. For for easy symmetry here but instead they make 40 and they're like oh I can't replace my 100 kot with 40 K. That's a problem. And so they think how can I double that double down, triple down, work harder, work more, work longer. And to me that is generally not the answer to me. It is create and diversify. So cool, if you can make 40 K. Consulting it's awesome. Now can you make 30 K. With a digital product? Can you make 20 K. Running a small community, can you make 10-K. Doing a podcast with sponsorships? Can you make five K. Selling a piece of artwork? Can you make three K. You know, there's a million different ways, right. I could keep going but like can you stitch together All of these different revenue streams the same way that you might diversify your investment portfolio. Right? We don't just invest in one stock and hope it takes off, we invest in a diversified portfolio. So diversify your revenue streams. Try and get 20 k out of five different revenue streams a lot easier than trying to get 100 cattle one of them. And so um that's how I think about it. So I'm an advisor, a consultant coach around a community, you've got products, those things all add up to form my living. And so that's that's how I think about maybe reducing risk and expanding and diversifying your income streams. What's the signal to you? That one stream is maybe it's not tapped out but it's time to stop putting as much effort on this one. Let's let this ride out for a little bit and open up the next kind of opportunity and put my time there. Yeah, it's a great question. I don't know that there's like an exact moment in time where I think something's plateau owed, but most things that plateau are, are usually in the trade time for money area, so like you can raise your rates and make more money by trading your time. There's only only so many hours in the day, right? There's only so many hours in the year. And consultants face this problem where they're like, oh even if I charge $1000 an hour, there's still only 2000 and 80 hours in this, you know this, I think, yeah, I might be missing that. But so you have limits, right? You have, you have limited upside on businesses like that. So instead I try and think about how do I grow my time, right? How do I...

...effectively take things that I see that I'm doing on a regular basis? If I do things more than two times or three times in a row, it's like, Can I package that up and sell that where I spend an hour of my time putting that into a digital product and then people can buy it for the rest of history, right? Until it becomes no longer that interesting. And so I look at trying to maximize the amount of time you actually want to spend every week. So like I want to work about 20 hours a week and that's that's just the life that I wanted to send. True for you For my consulting and advising business. Yes. Right. I spend I spend time doing other things, but I want to be committed. I want to be committed to clients between 15 and 20 hours per week. And so I'm I create my own plateau because I don't want to do any more than that. And so I use that free time that I have outside of those hours to go out and build things that scale without my time. And I think that's what people forget is like, man, this client asked me the same the same thing as five other clients. Why would I continue to answer with my time? Why not just build a product that I can deliver into this client, they can go watch it on their own. And so that's how I think about sort of plateau going and then pivoting and building something new. That doesn't take so much time. And I imagine that you know, by going into these other areas, it's almost like a brand slash legion business for your other projects. Right? Like when you're posting on linkedin that could bring a consulting client that could bring a course client, it could be a community client, it could be nothing or something you haven't even thought of yet. And so by putting your effort into a certain bucket, if it's public, especially it could, you know, bring you a client in a completely different area that's unrelated totally. That happens to me all the time. We're all right. Something about like a digital product of mine and for some reason it will resonate with a B two B SAAS founder and they'll come out and say, hey, I took a look at your linkedin profile and I noticed that you used to work in, you know, the healthcare tech space and we're building a new healthcare startup. Would love to, you know, bring you on as an advisor or consultant. That's really, really interesting to me having multiple revenue streams and multiple products allows you to do something really interesting, which is, it allows you to really focus on your ideal customer profile. So most people who are have one income stream on the side. When a client comes their way for consulting, they don't have to accept it, but it's in their best interest right there trying to make a little money. It's hard to say no for me, I've got the community, the products, I've got coaching. So when a client comes to me, they need to be really specific. And the best clients for me, early stage Smb SAAS companies in the healthcare technology space, Usually between one and 10 million and recurring revenue. So when someone comes to me, I can say yes to that, I can say no to everything outside of that because I have so many other different revenue streams going that I'm not dependent on that client. And so I think by diversifying that way, you also, you also get to choose your clients much more effectively and that's just a better situation or a position of being the most, most consultants and coaches. Do you have advice for folks that are getting into the consulting game on how they take their compensation in terms of like equity versus salary versus maybe a combo? Yeah, I mean you have to do what's right for your situation. And there are a lot of folks who like, they have a lot of money and so they can take equity right, they've got a few million bucks in the bank and they can, they can take equity and take some bets and, and that's awesome. There are folks in that same situation, they have a lot of money and they don't want to take a bet right or they don't have much money and they can't take a bet. So they have to take cash. There's all these different situations for me, I like to pay my bills and so I don't take equity. I have equity in companies that I've worked at, I have equity and to companies that are, are successful and so I'm placing my bets there and everything else I get paid in cash. And so I recommend setting an aspirational hourly rate something that you really want to make and then whittling down your ideal customer profile so that when someone comes through to you...

...you're you're the best at what you do for example tom I spent five years at sea which is health care technology. B. Two B sas early stage, it grew to later stage while I was there and then I spent five years building patient pop also healthcare technology also B two B sas smb transactional, really quick sale cycles. I'm really good at that. One thing. If you talk to me about enterprise, I'm lost. Talk to me about you know, Fintech, I don't understand it. There's all these things that I'm not very good at but I am pretty good at this one thing and so go find that thing and then charge your aspirational hourly rate when you find that thing and let your clients say you're worth it because the the expertise and experience you have is very much related to the problems that I'm trying to solve. So that's how I think about it. You can do the same thing with equity but I prefer to take cash. That's how I think about it. Do you mind if we get pretty tactical with a few questions for the creators out there? Because I think again we there's a lot of content that I see about the getting started about the high level and so I'm curious like you've got multiple different income streams. We mentioned a few of them earlier tactically do you have like a company that is set up for like an L. C. For each of these different properties and then you're handling like the costs and the revenue for all of them or do you just see them as I'm Justin welch inc and here is like my total line revenue and I'm going to disperse it in whatever way I see fit. Yeah I I have just an LLC Justin d. Welch LLC I I recommend that in from a legal perspective I'm not a lawyer so don't take my advice but like so I went and made a, I made a bunch of side money before I ever had an LLC like go prove value in the market first, right before you spend time whipping up an LLC get paid on stripe whatever and then I started an LLC and all of my businesses fall underneath that LLC. I separate them in stripes so I have a different stripe account for each one of my business is I sell you know products on gum road, I host my products and teachable so things are kind of all over the place but I have a bookkeeper that's the only person that like I have no employees but I have a bookkeeper who at the end of every month says you know this is how you did and this is where the income came from and so to me it's it's all about making it easy like don't overcomplicate getting started, get started without an LLC, make a few 1000 bucks, whip one up and keep everything under one roof, yep, and I've been a great follower, we gotta give a shout out to jennifer, Welch on the spot as well, because she uh your wife is killing it in the personal finance game on linkedin and maybe other social platforms, but I follow her on linkedin and you seem to have a very like systematic way of, of taking the earnings that you have, and then just like continuing probably to invest them in the products that you make, but then also like in investing them and you seem to be very systematic, so I'd love for you to just maybe talk about like where your mentality is on that cash flow situation. Yeah, I'm super lucky. My wife, jennifer comes from the startup world like I did, we met at ST dot, she was the director of office operations and she established global offices in India phoenix in new york for the company and she tried to start her own business around that and just, I didn't realize how much of it was related to sales and selling herself and she's not a natural salesperson, so she struggled there and she was kind of looking for some purpose and I was successful and was making good what was making good income and her dad's a former stockbroker. Um and jennifer has been a huge fan of investing, and so she just like reads everything, she can get her hands on, she knows everything about the stock market. She's super smart about that stuff and we actually took our money away from our financial advisor and we all of our wealth is now managed by jennifer And that's been really awesome to watch happen and we systematize things really effectively. I'm very, very, very much a control freak. And so every Friday morning at 6:30 AM, I look at all of my accounts, I tabulate how much income I made that...

...week and then we have a simple excel for pretty complicated excel document where I enter that total and then it tells me how much we're going to put into a savings account, how much we're going to invest in the market and then how much we have to spend the following week And then I'll enter how we did spending that week versus what we had set aside from the previous week. And so we track those earnings and that investment and I think we, you know, save 30%, invest 30% and spend 40%. And my dad always told me pay yourself first and so we think about that in the savings for an emergency and um in the investment account. And so every friday morning we look at the number, I send a click a button, jennifer gets the money, she takes it into E trade or and starts starts buying And we've been doing that for now 10 months and it's been incredible. She's, I mean everyone's winning right now in the market, but like we, we got a percentage and a half point back from our financial advisor. So we're percentage in and a half, you know, point more wealthy, which is nice. That's awesome. What, just out of curiosity, do you do it every week because you are a control freak or why would you do it weekly versus every month when you look at your revenues. So I count every expense in the bank. Um, so I tabulate every expense and tabulating a whole month's worth of expenses is really challenging. Tabulating a whole week's worth of expenses is much, much more simple and it also gives you a sense of how you're doing right. So if you blow one week out of like if at the end of the month you're like holy cow, I spent way more than I was supposed to spend. That's like, that's problematic. If you do it for one week, it's like you can, you can correct behavior a little bit a little bit faster and so I don't know, I think, I think that coupled with the fact that I am a control freak, I like numbers. I like to see that our, our wealth and money is moving in the right direction. You know, I like to think about retiring early, those are goals of mine. And so that helps me visualize it, make sure that I'm on the right path. And having jennifer as a partner to be a part of that is just is awesome. That's great. You brought up the Web three stuff a little earlier. Sounds like you're maybe dipping your toe into it or maybe your holy avoiding it. Have you started researching it at all and trying to like understand it a little bit, It feels like at some point that's gonna be where this heads. So just curious like if you start to research that yet at all or not. Yeah it's interesting. I think we were sharing before we started recording my wife's out of town this uh this week on a girls trip and I've actually set aside some time this week to start reading some primers. Even if I'm not interested in getting into it. Like I like to be educated in general but I just like to understand how things work even if I don't intend to participate, I'm not an artist, I don't know how N. F. T. S. Work. I I have a slight understanding but I'd like to be educated and so um I actually went on twitter and found a really nice primer from a few folks who are really deep in the space and I've set aside some time to to educate myself this week. I don't know that I'll again I'll ever dive deep into it. I'm rooted in practicality and I'm not suggesting that they're impractical but they are less practical in my mind than your traditional business. And therefore um I'm making an assumption and a hypothesis that I will not participate. But once I read through you know these primers who knows maybe I go down the rabbit hole maybe I enjoy it way more than I thought I would like to be exposed to different ideas just to give myself a chance to prove what I'm thinking. As incorrect. Yeah. I'm I'm probably in a similar stage as you trying to get my toes wet, learn about it and see it feels like there is something there for even like a B. Two B sas B two B. Sales world that doesn't have to be like an N. F. T. Like we think of it today but I'll let I'll let the audience know once we do our 100 hours of research and maybe can come out a little bit more educated. The worst thing that happens is you you're smarter about a topic that that it looks to be moving mainstream so that...

...that's why I'm going to dive in. Yeah. Absolutely. Um So I want to talk to you about the audience and income community a little bit because I feel like of all of the things that you do. I would say I know the least about that. And I would say you may be advertised the least about that Compared to your courses compared to your experience with patient pop and rock doc, which leads to consulting and some of the other things you do. So I think you mentioned a little over 400 people part of the community before we started recording. So maybe you could just educate me a little bit on like what, what exactly is audience and income. Sure. So I'll kind of frame it up this way everyone is out there right now embracing this creator economy. This idea that you can go online, share a little bit of your expertise and earn some extra income. That's exciting to people. The idea is exciting, the what and the why is exciting what is missing is generally the how how do I actually do this? Like how do I not spend a bunch of times spinning my wheels and fail to make any income, But give myself 20 hours more, more of things to do each week, so that's, that's a problem. And so I want to do attempt to solve that problem by creating a community of creators right? To get people who want to dip their toe in the water into a private community where we can share best practices where we can say this worked, this failed, I just launched a product, I made $1,000, here's how I did it. And so that's what audience and income is, it is essentially a group of about 420 people Spans, I think 50 or 51 countries, which is really awesome. Um just jamming together on slack. Right, really simple. We've got slack, we've got live workshops bi weekly and we're bringing in experts in specific niches. I think next week we'll bring in Shaun Anthony to teach us how to do cold email. We're gonna bring in matt Raglan to talk about how to make your 1st $1000 selling digital products. We're gonna bring in Marcus chan to talk about Building six and 7 figure consulting businesses. Jennifer Just did a postmortem on her first digital product. I did a workshop on how to pick a more profitable niche. So this is an area where people can both learn from the workshops, but they can also then interact with each other. They can support each other online, they can support each other's launches, they can form small groups and work on projects together. As I was mentioning to you before in our winds channel just recently, I'm seeing people say I just landed my first five figure consulting gig. I just sold the 1st $1,000 in my course. I just sold my 1st $10,000 worth of community so on and so on and so forth. And I love to be sort of the, the architect of that. My whole goal is like empowering people to make extra money. Like the average american has like 400 bucks and if, if, if an emergency happened, I think some wild percentage of americans couldn't afford it and that's a problem. And so I'm thinking outside of their work, if they can automate a little bit of extra income and something does happen, they're more likely to be covered. And I think the teamwork and the camaraderie of this community is awesome. And so jennifer and I um we're gonna head out to London in february and visit our members there. We're gonna go to brussels. We just got back from visiting some members in san Francisco. We're kind of doing the tour right? And it's been a lot of fun. So it's been interesting. It's a lot of work but it's a lot of fun. I'm curious as someone that has run sales teams and sales departments of dozens of people, how does the feeling of impacting those people at a company right? Like a lot of why you might get into leadership is that it's fulfilling to help others. And it seems like that's also what you're doing right now with your community and your courses, would you say it feels the same, would you say there's a difference between the two? I'm just genuinely curious. It's a really good question and here's how they're different. I had 100 and 40 people on my team at patient pop and we were paying them to be there right, it's their job. And so um being candid...

I'm a very transparent person and so I tend to be super candid and transparent with my feedback. and so uh it's easy to do that when you're paying someone right is less easy to do that when they're paying you. And so um when I'm in my community, I have to remember that these are my customers, right? These are not just community members and friends in what I look at his colleagues, but they're also customers. And so um you walk a fine line when giving blunt feedback when trying to help people make the right decision. And that is challenging. And I think that has helped me potentially grow as a leader. You know, I have to reframe things versus how I might have, you know, did it at patient pop and Botox. So that's been really interesting in the end though, the outcome is the same right at patient pop. My job was of course to hit targets, don't get me wrong, but like I think about all the people who are no longer there, who are in better positions at other companies who are now VPs of sales directors of sales went from being a S two managers somewhere else. Like my goal was to make them successful. Like ultimately patient pop, I wanted to be successful, but I wanted people to be successful. I continue to get good chances in the SAS world because I have 50 people that I've coached into the, into the executive suite that have started someone started as entry level as STRS and they say great things, They help introduce me into different opportunities. That's awesome, I want to do the exact same thing, an audience income. I want people to be like, I've never made a dime, I made $10,000 in extra income in 2021 it was because of audience income and like, that's cool. I'm a very karma based guy. So I believe when you, when you do things like that, karma karma comes back and I, and I love that. So I'm just putting good vibes out into the world and hoping that, you know, in the future, if I ever need some help that I have a community of folks who will be there to help me. So I love that. What's more important to focus on audience or income audience? Why? Because there's no income without it, right? Like um you know when I, I use the word audience and people get so caught up in nomenclature, they're like, oh, don't call it audience call it community, but it doesn't matter. We're all talking about the same thing, right? So like the idea is you have to get some attention and that's like a really weird word to use and people don't like when I use it, but that's what it is, right? We're all adults on social media vying for attention. That's, that's what we're doing and people don't like that, but that's exactly what it is and so if you can get that attention, you can do two things with it you can put it too bad use or you can put it to good use and so what I like to do is try and build my audience up and then put it to good use. Win win. I like to get customers and I like people to leave me awesome testimonials saying I've changed your life, I've changed their career and that in and of itself is currency as well. So that's how I think about it. Okay I've got a few last questions for you before we wrap this thing up. Any books podcasts, people you're following, anything like that that you've been really into recently. That's been helpful for you could be in the creator economy space or a completely different topic but anything stand out. Yeah. I really like I don't read a lot of books which is like not a cool thing to say out loud or on the podcast probably. But like books books to me are like 30 pages of good information and 200 pages of filler generally. And so I think the the internet has forced I like the internet because it's just like give me the stuff give me the meat right? And 11 meaty site that I like is marketing examples dot com. It's run by a guy named Harry Dry. He's young. I don't know how young he is. I I my guests and Harry I'm sorry if if you ever hear this and I guess your age wrong, but Um...

I I think he's probably 22-25 would be my guest and um he's brilliant marketer. He writes really cool pieces, breaking down copyrighting, breaking down marketing, psychology, breaking down content, promotion, distribution. And so I go to marketing examples.com. I'm not affiliated at all. It's just a plug because I like the site and I read, I read this content on a regular basis when it comes out. I think that has been some of the most helpful content that I've consumed. I like to spend time on twitter every once in a while reading guys like Julian Shapiro, I think he's really good at growth. You know, I follow some traditional marketers in the space. I love chris walker over at refined labs. He's become a buddy of mine and he's obviously done a really good job on linkedin. I think he's awesome. I like Dave dave gerhard stuff. I love josh braun for tactical sales information. Yeah, that that that's why I spent most of my time reading online stuff and outside of that, I like the monocle travel guide series. I'm like big into learning about other cities and other cultures. I think in a weird way that helps me become a well rounded person and when you're a well rounded person, I think you think more clearly and so um you know, I've got a book here on Mexico city, I was just reading because I went there with a buddy of mine. Yeah. I like all kinds of different wild stuff but those are a few things I like it. I like it. Um Okay so here's the scenario, let's say this is a real scenario of a friend of mine. So I'm gonna ask a selfish question on her behalf. You got someone that is you know not making a ton of money we'll say is you know had the rent raised needs a couple extra 100 bucks a month. Let's just put it that way is the bet. Would you advise someone to try to get a new job in that same industry or get a promotion or whatever to try to earn that money or just start hustling on the side and just whatever it might be. Uber driver craig. Of course whatever it might be. Yeah. I mean I wouldn't recommend becoming an Uber driver because I think that's taking low pay for trading your time and I think that that's their the least attractive option. Right? It would depend there would probably be some extra context would be helpful but here's how I might think about the problem if this person likes their job and they want to keep it and they enjoy working at that place. Then I might recommend finding a way to make a few extra $100 if they dislike their job right now is a candidate's market Like I'd go out and get a different one that pays a little more. If she or he dislikes their job. Why not both? Right? Why not go out and say all I need's a five K. Race. It's an extra $400. Gross. It's an extra $250 net that covers my whatever I need. But also like I do X every day at work and there's probably a lot of people who are struggling to do that. You don't need to price it at $100. Go out and make a 30 minute video that helps people get from point a to point B. Charge $15 for it. Go out once a week on social media. Tell people about it, shine a light on the problem. Talk about how you solved it, Offer the course up. If you can get 10 people to buy it In one month, you made $150. Like not life changing money but in this person's situation that you've described. It seems like that would be helpful. And so I guess that's how I would think about it is if they hate their job, get a new one that pays more and do a side thing. If they love their job, try and figure out how to juice a few extra 100 bucks out of out of the job either by performing better, getting a promotion, asking for a raise. And also do the side thing. like again diversify your opportunity for success. Don't make big huge bets, Make small bets. I dig it. I appreciate that last question for you and then let us know where the best place to find you. If anyone isn't connected with you, let's listen to this. But who in your community, your network that you're connected with recently that you think should come on this podcast. I'm so...

...disengaged from the SAAS world. I'll tell you what, there's a couple of really interesting people that would benefit from hearing you would benefit from hearing from one is the ceo of a company called luxury presence. His name is multi Kramer. He's building a really cool business in LA and he's a young founder, he's not american. He came over from europe and he's building this really cool real estate business called luxury presence. I think from a founder's perspective, he would offer some really neat insights. I love the world of venture capital. I think um the person that I'm closest to is Patrick Matheson from TOBA TOBA capital. I think he'd be an awesome V. C. To interview wealth of knowledge. Super smart guy. You know, really practical. You know, I think some up and coming leaders would be really helpful here are three up and coming leaders. You're gonna hear a lot more about in the next five years. one is just Strickland, Jeff Strickland is currently the vice president of Inside sales at patient pop, I hired jess six years ago as an account executive and he has been promoted up through the ranks nonstop. He is a future stud. It's going to, he's going to build a massive business someday, say the same thing about max kim Brown, he is the vice president of field sales at patient Pop. He is a born leader, really thoughtful. Any challenge I ever had, I could, I could give to that guy and then two more would be Sandeep Dhaliwal, Sunee Dhaliwal, he's a young rising manager in the sales world. Super sharp, super thoughtful and then last is Derek Jankowski and Derek was my SDR at hotdog and I hired him as my first account executive at patient pomp and he just recently took his first VP of sales job so I'm really, really pumped for him. So those are four folks that I think are really excellent in up and coming. Your recommendations are always spot on. I've had Derek on this pod sonny, you actually introduced me to for my other podcast that I run and he was an absolute stud and the other two I haven't so or the other, you know, to patient pop and then the other two folks. So that's awesome. Um Justin always appreciate your time, your energy. I love what you're doing just on linked in and trying to help people out to take their career in in a new direction and give them more options and more freedom and a chance to make an impact. So if anyone's not learning from you connected with you, what's the best place for them to uh to hit you up? Yeah, you can just hit me up on linkedin, Justin Welch, it's W E L S H, you can go to my website Justin welch dot me, if you're interested in my sort of flagship product, you can go to the operating system dot C O, that's how you grow and monetize Lincoln. And if you're interested in my community, you can go to audience and income dot C O. Awesome, appreciate it. Justin tom Good to Good to talk to you man, Thanks for the great questions. Thanks so much for checking that episode out of the Pavilion podcast again, you can hit me up on linkedin. My name's Tom Alamo. Otherwise, this episode was brought to you by Sandoz. So they deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts, and other physical impressions that make your outreach more personal. Until next week, we'll see you on monday. Get after it Peace, say something. Mhm.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (229)