The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 2 months ago

Ep 236: Talking Career Growth w/ Rachel Mayes, VP Sales at Nowsta

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 236: Talking Career Growth w/ Rachel Mayes, VP Sales at Nowsta

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Book. All right, this episode is brought to you by contract book. Raise your hand if you love managing contracts. We didn't think so. Contract book created an all in one contract automation platform with data at the heart of everything. To help organizations automate mundane tasks that waste your valuable time, energy and resources. Visit Contract Bookcom to excess contract books complete set of automation tools for free. Now let's get into the show. All right, coming as from New York, we got Rachel May's on the podcast. Rachel, Good Morning, how are you? Good morning, how are you? I am doing well, excited to chat with you. Yeah, same here. So I'd love to. I'd love to just dive in and learn a little bit about the early days of your career. I know you're on the East Coast now, California, you know, upbringing, and we're there for quite some time. I know you went to San Diego State and then, like, coming off of that, did you get straight into sales? Did you have other jobs, like what did that whole kind of period of your life look like? Yeah, so when I graduated from San Diego, I was I kind of did what a lot of Sandagans do at that time I moved to La there wasn't a ton of job opportunity is like there is now in southern California, especially for folks just graduating. So my degree was actually in journalism and media studies, so I got right into marketing. I did marketing for about two years. I was in the beverage industry. Really wanted to figure out what I wanted to do. I was actually making a strategic campaigns for the sales team, so I was actually working hand in hand with those folks and actually really fell in love with the sales motion. Through that Opportunity I knew I wanted to get into tech and at that time being, you know, just just six hours south of the bay area, knew that I had to get up to San Francisco. So I started, we're, reaching out to my network, some folks that I had known and I actually met a friend in Manhattan beach that was working at Yelp and said you should come work here. It's a phenomenal company. I applied online, went through the process, got it, packed my bags and move to San Francisco. Nice. and Are you from San Diego? No, I'm actually from Sacramentou. So I'm bordered is in northern California. Wanted to always wanted to live in southern California, so lived there for about seven and a half years before coming up north. Got You and when you were will get to yelp in a second, but when you were at San Diego State and you said media journalism, like, where did that come from? was that like something you were really interested in, or was it more like me, was like, I'm just going to kind of pick something random and figure it out later? or how did they how'd you come up with that? Yeah, so I started off actually as a PR major, so I thought that was where my heart was at. I became very interested in my journalism and media studies through some of the courses that I was taking. Journalism became incredibly interesting to me. As far as you know, how we that was also the boom of social media, so it was also I mean facebook was created when I was in college. So it was really interesting how people were absorbing different information and the way that communication was changing all over the world and the spread of information. So I became very, very interested in that and wanted to dive much deeper into that and I started actually really falling in love with my courses going into the back half of my sophomore year and fully committed to that, to that Major. From there. Nice did facebook make its way? Like well, you were in college, like did you know about it or you just like afterwards really made it all the way out to San Diego? Yeah, so I was. Yeah, so I created my facebook page I think, like four...

...months into college, and that was when you actually needed a college email address to be a part of it. So when I actually went to college, I still had my myspace and then it got on to facebook about four months in and you didn't really know what it was. You were kind of just posting statuses and you know, it used to say Rachel May Ise is. So also, there's just so many grammatical errors because it is like at the each or is, which it's really funny to look back at those old statuses and see it. So yeah, it was a very interesting time and that was incredibly, incredibly interesting and exciting to me. So a lot of it was thinking about television, radio, obviously, the thecom boom, and so that was a lot of what my classes were about and how the changes were actually affecting the global economy and how that was going to move us forward, and so I actually I actually did one of my senior thesis papers on Sales Force because it was actually that company was, at the time the fastest company to reach a billion and so it was how Internet companies and tech companies were actually changing the world. So super cool. And that leads to yelp because in a different way, like that's, you know, the social media of like, you know, the restaurant or the service industry. And so you joined there like two thousand and twelve, two thousand and thirteen. How big was yelped at that point? It shosh, I think we were. I mean it was definitely a gross stage company at that point. It was large. I'm trying but don't remember off the top of my head how many folks were at Yelp the San Francisco office. We are in a much smaller office. So we were on mission and first before moving to the big one hundred and forty new Montgomery office, which is a corgeous huge building, and so at the time it was very much like we would actually show a picture of the one hundred and forty new Montgomery office and when we would have this like earn your seat, which was getting to this beautiful fancy office. So I think we had four floors in the seven hundred mission office. So, you know, maybe a couple thousand people. Yeah, thousand got you and Yep. And did you know people from being from Sacramento, like did you have friends from high school or college that were in the bay or did you just pick up a take in, like I want to get into sales and you know, I'll kind of figure out this whole new city too. Yeah, so I had heard about the job from a friend who actually worked in the Scottsdale Office. So I knew a couple of people that worked out in the Phoenix Scottsdale Office. A few of my friends from San Diego that were from the bay area had decided to move back up at the same time. We were all in that bucket of just have gotten jobs in southern California. We knew we had to be in tech. So a friend of mine, actually two friends, got a job at sales force, I got a job at yelp and then another one of the women that I moved up to San Francisco with, she got a job at Gilead. So we were all like we're up leveling we're moving up to the bay. But no, I didn't know anybody at Yelp and San Francisco. I didn't really have any friends from high school or growing up with that were in the bay at that time. So the three of US moved up there together. Two of US got an apartment, which was really fun. We lived in Alamo Square to start Nice, very cool. So the first job, you your first sales job, that is you're walking into yelp. Talk to me about the experience like. Did you pick it up quickly? Where you crushing out of the gates? Did you have struggles, like what was the first you know, twelve months like for you? Yeah, so it was. It was incredible coming from a completely different industry which was much harder and did not treat their employees the way that Tech Company street their employees. I was bright, item, bushytailed and absolutely loved it. So at the time, you'll had just gone into gross stage mode and so they were actually hiring classes of thirty people at a time.

So I was in one of those classes of thirty people. We were all really excited getting into our sales careers. A ton of new college grads, a ton of people that had just moved to San Francisco from all over the world for the first time. So they put us in classes. So there was a ninety day training period and during those first for me, a sixty day training period, and during those first thirty days it was very much like here's how you open your email, here's how you send a note, here's how you sales force, and I actually refer to my time at yelled often as yelp you, because it felt like those four years for basically my introduction to the work world and setting me up for my career after that. So the first I did very, very well in training, but I will say the first month I did not close a deal and I was freaking out because most people you get about a week of training and then they just put you on the phones. Yelp very much has that kind a scrape your knees mentality. So we were on the phones for three weeks. After that, everyone was starting to close their deal and you were so tight knit with your class that came in and you all had a closing song, which was really fun and exciting. We were the dead. I need to know your closing song. Oh, it was by Malcamore. It was thrift shop. Yes, it was trif shop. I was like, I was saying you in my head. I was like yeah, so it was grift shop. Yeah, and when I still hear that Song I always think about that moment. And I just could I was getting a ton of meetings but I was just not closing, and a big thing. I have a natural, really outgoing personality, but I had a really hard time asking for it, and so I was getting a lot of follow ups. Okay, like let's chat and you know, a couple weeks and I would say okay, great, and then I would go to my manner. I like they're going to buy, they're so excited, and then they would never answer my call ever again, as people do. So my boss, my manager of the time, Emily Meir Sand, who was still a close friend of mine. She's an incredible sales leader and was the top ruppet yelped for a very long time. She kept telling me she was actually barging into my cause and she was like Freachel, ask for it, ask for it, and so I actually started pushing back on the gentleman on the phone and he closed and I couldn't believe it as he was entering his credit card. My hands were so sweaty as I was entering it in. And then after that I picked up the phone, called someone who I had demo that morning and was like Kay, you told me that this is important to you. Ran through the Roi with her. Let's get you signed up, and then I actually closed three deals that afternoon and from there it kind of it took off and I was really, really successful in my first few months at yelled. After that actually hit presidents club as a new as a new member of the yelped team. Wow, a new hire, which was awesome. That's crazy. So nothing for a month and then three and one day, and I feel like that's just how it happened. Sometimes, like you've got to go through the adversary and then once you hit whatever that turning point is, whatever that's skill is that you needed, which in your case it sounds like just like not being comfortable asking for the sale or asking like the really hard questions. I think is something that I'm actually impressed that it only took you a month, because it took me probably six months to get to that point where you just feel like you're forcing it on someone or like you know you're being too pushy or to whatever. But in my experience, in my opinion, if you believe in what you're selling and you've done the right discovery and you know that what their challenges are, you can solve and you can make their life a lot better, a lot easier, you're almost doing a disservice to them by not getting whatever you're selling into their hands. Yeah, I actually that. I was actually going to mention that I believe that my success in sales particularly has been because I've always been such a strong believer in whatever I'm selling. And I was very, very pashonate about small businesses. Both my parents are small business owners and...

I knew how important an online presence was, again going back to my original major, I knew how important it was for especially small businesses, to bring their to bring your companies into the twenty one century. And there would just be very basic things. There would be restaurants in San Francisco that we're getting twentyzero views per month and their first picture was of somebody's dirty plate or of and they weren't logging in and interacting with their customers and like these are people that love you, that go to your restaurant every single week and because you don't like the platform, you're completely ignoring you know these this group of people, and let's talk about that and let me coach you on how I can help your business. And that was a big part of it for me was I always really felt like it was in their best interest. I never felt like I sold somebody something that they didn't need or didn't want, and a big part of that comes from that deep discovery. Like you said, yeah, absolutely, this might be a little bit of a tangent, but what kind of businesses did your parents have? So my mom does corporate housing, which a lot of people are don't know what that is, but I don't see. Yeah, so she actually works with large organizations. So she actually works a lot in Solilicon valley. So large companies like apple or facebook, they'll have to relocate people for specific projects from all over the world. What ends up happening is, let's say you need to live in, you know, pal alazo or mountain view or Sunnybe all. There's most of the places that she works. Then you don't want to stay in a hotel for three, four, five, six months. A lot of times folks are bringing their families. So what she does is she partners with usually high end apartment communities to set them up so those folks can live there for those part time jobs or those part time stints in a city. And she doesn't really keep jobs. She will, you know, give them packets of like these are the best restaurants to go to in the area. This is, you know, the areas you want to hang out and go shopping, go to workout classes, whatever it is, and then she partners with the communities to set up these units for them and furniture companies, kind of AIRBNB esque. Saunder actually, the company I'm Le Mer Sam, my old boss from y'Ella, does something very similar. Got You. That's cool. And What About Your Dad? Did He have one too? Yeah, so my dad has a landscaping business that he's done for a very long time. My mom and I sees him about how much he loves flowers all the time. He can name like every flower or plant anytime we're on a nature walk. It's adorable. But yes, and he has done that his entire life. He's incredibly passionate about it. Will actually take a step back. He was actually in the corporate world, spent many years doing that. Always said he never really found true passion and that and actually went back to what he went to school for and became a landscape he owns his own landscaping company still to this day and loves it. Very cool. So were you exposed to a lot of that, like growing up in terms of like the entrepreneurial Lens, because I typically see, or often see, I feel, like salespeople and sales leaders have a lot you have to you don't have to build. Oftentimes have like an entrepreneurial mind because you own your own business in a sense. There, or if you treat it that way, I think you can see a lot of success. I'm just curious if that was something that you started to once you got into sales, like take like, Oh, I remember when my mom or dad like did this or did that, and you know, you kind of take ownership over your own book of business and how that helps. Just curious of that ever, you know, kind of stick out to you? Yeah, absolutely so. I will say I took two pieces from each of my parents. My My dad has the passion side, like I said, and he's incredibly good with his customers. His business still to this day is all referrals. So he takes a ton of pride in what he does and he loves it and he always says I wake up every day and I feel like I'm not working. My mom on the other side of it, she...

...absolutely does what she loves too. But my mom hustles and has that entrepreneurial mindset and she started a business when I was fourteen and built it out of our house and I saw that and it was just actually her and I during that time and it was incredible to see what she's built over and over again. And she actually just just joined a for just bought a franchise two years ago. She's sixty years old now and she's still and she's still hustling. So I really get that hustle great drive from her and that entrepreneurial spirit from her and she really has that like own your own destiny, build what you want in front of you, and I got I got that from her. So it's nice kind of having both sides of my dad was always like never work a day in your life if you love what you do, and my mom was always like hustle and build the the life that you want. I love it. I love it so when you're at Yelp, you're there for about four years and had a number of different roles and got promoted. Did you always know that you wanted to go down a leadership path? Did you ever consider like I just want to be at an enterprise aear or how did that kind of conversation go in your head? Yeah, so I actually I'm glad you asked so I love talking about this. So at that time I just wanted to get promoted. I was like that's what text for me. I need to be a manager, and I got into a manager management role and about a year, which is, you know, pretty pretty standard at yelled. They usually promote people within folks first year, year and a half, two tears and at that time then going into a mid market sales function wasn't really it was more kind of, you know, for lack of a better worth the sexy and exciting to be a sales manager. So I went the management route and I really struggled. It was extremely hard for me. I talked about this a lot with new managers. I had the Michael Jordan Syndrome where I was like I'm in the best route, I'm the best rap. Just do what I do and follow me. And so my first six months as a manager, my team absolutely crushed it. We were killing our numbers. But I got my first management review, my first leadership reviews were and they're anonymous, and you get you get feedback from your team and it was tough reading these, this feedback from my team, and what I noticed was a lot of them felt like I didn't actually care about their career development, I wasn't taking time to get to know them as people and I was, you know, just driving sales and driving revenue, and that was how they felt. I all I cared about and it was true. So I I really took check of that and really started to think about what type of leader I wanted to be and, growing up as an athlete, I started to think about myself as a coach and I was very lucky because I had really strong mentors at yelled. That's a wonderful reason at working at Yelp, you come out of there was such strong mentors. And I went to one of the gentlemen that was a strong mentor for me and had been one of my managers, and I said, my team hates me, I don't know what to do. Help me and he gave me this book called the Weekly Coaching Conversation and I read it and for me to be able to change my mindset from being this leader to boss manager to a coach, completely change the way that I was leading my team and it took about four months for us to really get back to the top of the DSU, which that's what we called our leaderboard at Yelp, and we got there, but it took some it took some rebuilding, it took me gaining back the trust of my people and really getting in the weeds with them and letting them though, that I did care about their development, putting development plans together and not having it at the end of the day, it's all about revenue, it is sales, but really helping them grow and develop in their next stages in their career, and that was what was really important to them, and getting to know them on a personal level as well. Yes, so maybe this feels like an obvious question, but what is the difference in your mind, or in how...

...the book laid it out, between being a manager and being a coach, like what's the different mentality, or what are some of the different like how do you treat your day or how do you treat your team differently in that sense? Yeah, so the book is essentially about this gentleman who they have. It starts out and he has an incredible quarter or incredible year and he's not a bar celebrating and he tells the team like we're all going to go get drinks after this and nobody shows up and so he is basically sitting at this bar and this coach finds him and starts chatting with him about why nobody is there and it he basically takes him through this journey and it was a lot of those same a lot of those same things and mistakes that I was making and what they talked about with Michael Jordan and those same mistakes that he made. So one your team doesn't necessarily want to know how great you were as a salesperson, and it's not. I'm perfect. You everything that I do follow me. I think being a really great coach is taking a look at your team and I so I thought thought about it from a soccer mindset of what my really great coaches used to do, and they used to find what we were really good at and they used to double down on that. So and that's how they would position us, obviously for the field. That's how they would think about when to put us in, when to take us out, and I think that is a big part of what I think about all the time. So I always think about my team as a unit and I think about what drives them, what motivates them, when to push them, when to pull back, and I think that's also a big piece of and that goes back to getting to know them and actually knowing your team, knowing what motivates them, understanding their drivers and knowing when to push and when not to verse just, you know, being a boss, being a micro manager, making them feel like, you know, having this very strange connection. I'm sure you've had managers like this before, where you feel like they're on top of you every day, they don't really care about your development and you're just a number in a cogging a wheel for them. I think that's a huge difference. Yeah, I mean, I think reps you know, kid just you can sense it from day one, and I have. I've had amazing leaders I've worked for and I've had ones where I just I know I am someone on a spreadsheet or on a sales for Stash board and it just it changes, obviously how you feel on a Daytoday, but also just I want to work ten times harder for the person that I know gives a shit about where I want my career to go or what my goals are at the company or even outside the company. And so I think that's that's super important. And so when you talking about gets get to know the team better, I'll you know from what I've heard from a lot of folks on this podcast, like, again, maybe this seems intuitive, but for a lot of managers I don't think it is. Like I think you just have to ask right you can't just assume like everyone's motivated by a promotion or buy money or by recognition. Like I feel like part of this is like when you first get to know the team, asking those kind of intimate, awkward questions, because it's going to help you develop a better relationship with them. Yeah, absolutely, I completely agree with that. And I think also remembering, and I learned this as I continue to grow in my career, to ask different questions because a yell but was primarily New College grads or folks that were getting into sales for the first time, and then, as I grew in my career and I was managing under price sellers. Their motivation was much different and the way that I was leading that team was much different and that was also a learning curve. But agreed asking them what they want. There's a lot of sales folks that a promotion is not what they want. What they want is for you to leave them alone. They want to be able to golf or take, you know, take dance classes at three PM on a Friday. They want flexibility. A lot of folks are not necessari necessarily in it because most, I would say I really want to make money and hustle,...

...but a lot of them may be driven by passion because they love the product or they love what we're doing. And so there really is different motivators for everyone. And assuming every single person wants money, every single person wants flexibility, every single person wants X Y Z, puts you in a place to fail because it's really unique to each person and I think it changes throughout their life and I think that's another thing of knowing them very well. So I always try to know you know their home life, you know who they're who their spouses or their partner is or what motivates them outside of work? What are they like to do in their spare time, and also motivating them that way. So I'll try to take my team out to a game or to get to go on a walk or to get a manicure, get smoothies or whatever it is, to also take them outside of just that work environment, and I feel like that's also how you really get to know folks. It's so much easier to have those conversations, you know, when you're outside or somewhere not in an office or even on a zoom call. I don't know. Are you all remote, all inoffice? Hybrid? What's the what's your team's outlook right now? It's hybrid. So yeah, my team has been. It wasn't actually a huge change for me. I'd been managing a remote team since two thousand and eighteen, so it wasn't a huge shock to the system when everybody went remote. And I think you know I try to spend I try to see at least kind of too direct reports storring a month. Obviously now after the pandemic, but during the pandemic I think it was really when you're on zoom, I think sometimes it's really challenging to have other destructions, like you said, your you know, slack pop up or an email pop up, and I think it's really dedicating, just like you would in person, that thirty, forty, five minutes an hour to be fully focused and dialed in into what they're talking about. And I always like to start my one on ones with, you know, ten, fifteen minutes of what's going on their life. How are things going before we just hop into okay, what's your pipeline? You have for x pipeline? What's closing? Let's walk through sales stages and dive in that way. Yeah, I think that's super important. You talked a little bit about, you know, yelp and really caring about the product and believing in that. You have some like personal kind of background, like with your parents. That, I think, was probably motivating throughout your career. Just curiously, how do you go about picking different companies and different opportunities based on, you know, I imagine everywhere you've been you've had a similar type of belief. So do you do you kind of like take calls and and then scope out the product and see, like do I believe in it, or do you typically do it the reverse of like, and I am really like into whatever, you know, bitcoin and so like, I'm going to go find like a cool butever, you know, crypto company and try to follow that. Like how do you? How do you typically do it? Yeah, so that's a great question, I think. So I have made I think it's a little bit of a balance of both. I've made the mistake of just saying I you know, I really care about this, like this is where I want to work, because I think it's a balance of two things. It really has to be a company where I know I'm going to succeed. And I think part of growing in your career, and I've done this as sort of a reset after each time I've taken a new opportunity, is what, at this specific specific opportunity made me successful. Where do I think I had gaps and how can I make that better in the next decision that I make? And I think for me with Yelp, what I really loved was I was passionate, but it was really the people that I met and it was really the way that yelped cared about folks and I took that with me into my next roles and what I was looking for. So I think that's incredibly important is not only looking at the company and what the company's core beliefs are and if you're actually going to be a good fit. I think sometimes, and I've seen folks...

...do this, and folks that I've managed before if asked me for advice on things like this. But don't just go to a company because you think that you know, Oh, this is the the coolest company to work at right now because it's, you know, growing exponentially. It's a Unicorn. Everybody gets those linkedin messages. It really has. And then if you don't get that opportunity, you you feel horrible about yourself, but it's really is this the right time for you and your career for this role? Is the culture going to make sense for you and what type of growth are you going to see out of it? And then I also think adding that passion piece into it. Are you actually excited about what you're going to be selling? Is Extremely important, but I think it's a balance of both things. When I've gone on to new opportunities in my career, I have gone that path where I've been like, I'm just super excited and passionate about this and the company wasn't actually in a place where I was going to grow my career in the right way and I had to course correct after that. Yeah, that's that's super well said. I'd love to talk about what you're doing nowadays, and I know it at now. So you've got a lot of growth, a lot of scaling, which is I feel like, you know, there's kind of these different levels to you know, being a leader. Where your frontline, you know, you're focusing probably more in the coaching. Second Line you're probably starting to see like, okay, what's the future of the company and how are we forecasting the business and things like that. Now, at your level you're also probably dealing with like hey, we need like to get our certain amount of funding in so that we can really project far out and really like scale this up and scale the processes. So I'd love for you to talk about like what that experience has been like for you. Yeah, so I joined now staff during in June of two thousand and twenty. So it was really interesting going to a series a start up that was primarily focused on SMB hospitality three months into the pandemic and also moving to New York City. I got a lot of questions that are you adding your mind. But again, I really saw the future for this Organization for a multitude of reasons. My first year there we were as SASS business at the time and a Fintech business primarily, and we were building out our market place. We only had about four or five opportunities there and I had to ad's on my team at the time, and so the first six months that I was there I was actually focused a lot on building out process and sales funnel and all of the things that you want at a larger organization and I had to kind of take check of that and say, right now, we really need to figure out where the revenue is going to come from and really put my head down and drive revenue. So I was taking I had to go back to my skill set that I had had at Yelp, where you're in the weeds, you're barging a's on calls, you're looking at, you know, call the demo ratio. Are they talking to enough DM's? A lot of that rolling up your slaves work that I hadn't done in almost six years. So went back to that. It was extremely fun. We closed, you know, our first forty deals on the labor market side of the business. We launched in Miami and that's when. That was about April of last year, April two thousand and twenty one, and we started to get we already had a lot of momentum with investors prior but we were waiting to get a lot of momentum from our revenue standpoint before we, you know, raise another round, and so I started meeting with investors at that time by CEO really drove most of that, but I was obviously involved in the in the conversations, and it was really painting the picture for the future of what we were building and it was giving them a competitive analysis of what the market looked like and why our customers loved us so much and why our product was so sticky. So we raised our series B in December of this year, which was incredible. At that point I had about ten direct reports. So I had hired some bdrs,...

I had hired a few account managers and CSM so on the post sale side of the business, and then I had built out an SMB team that was focused on that hospitality transactional sale and then I had hired three in market enterprise as that we're focusing on driving us up market. So trip fast forward to now. Our company is the growth that we see in the last six months has just been incredible. We hired a new COO. In the last three weeks we've hired a head of marketing, a head of CS A, I have a sales manager now for my team. We're hiring a bed our manager, and so really what I'm looking at now is getting to the number and hiring a very successful team, and I think it's a very my biggest challenge right now is hiring very quickly to ensure that we have enough bodies in place to be able to hit the number while balancing still making sure that we're going to market correctly, while also making sure that we hire incredibly successful people. Something that I learned at a previous role in chariot was that every person that you hire at this stage is so crucial to your culture, is so crucial to the growth of your business that even making one higher that is not the right fit or is it you know isn't going to retain, really does set you back. So I've been really focused on hiring the right folks in this role. That's been primarily my focus. I got to know because I love, you know, listening to stories of entrepreneurs and, you know, founders that are talking about the their growth businesses and things like that. I got to know, like when you're in the room with the vcas and your talk and you're kind of like selling them on the idea of now step, how different is that from a regular sales call, right, like is it? Is it a similar kind of like skill set? Hey, we're trying to, you know, I guess, sell you on the Vision, obviously, of where we're going and why, you know, whatever funding that we're going after, like you should get involved. Just curious, like any major differences between that and like all of the, you know, decade of experience you have and in other SASS businesses? Yeah, so I would say, I would say most of my sales calls would be a lot of discovery and a lot of digging in and really understanding, you know, what a customer wants and that's, you know, how you sell them on the vision of what you're building. I think when I, you know, I'm talking to vcs that are interested in our business, it's really it's mostly all focused on big picture and not the granularity that you're going to get into on a sales call. So really focusing on I like to talk about, and my CEO does a wonderful job of this, like market conditions now. So's really in a great place from a market standpoint. It's really what the market is asking for and kind of where that came from. A big part of it right now is prior to the pandemic, during the pandemic, how that changed and how we move forward and really focusing on competitive landscape and growth and a lot of those things you wouldn't really touch on on a sales call. So it's a lot more focused on big picture growth, where we see challenges and how we're overcoming those things. So I like to get ahead of which a lot of people talk about is like the EMINEM mindset, yees getting ahead of a lot of pitfalls that they could potentially see and going through this prior I've know a lot of what you know PECs are looking for and asking for and trying to get ahead of a lot of their pit balls and making sure that they're very confident in what we're building and I think having a concrete plan. So I do a lot of planning before those calls. Having a concrete plan for growth. Having a concrete plan and a very clear vision to hitting the number is incredibly important and then also having that big picture, more true behind it.

Yeah, I love it. I love the eminent mindset too. Let's let's transition to a couple rapid fires. Let the audience get to know you a little bit better. So first up, we're big learners on the podcast. I know you mentioned one of the books earlier that helped you from from a coaching perspective earlier in your career. There is, if there's any other books that stand out to you, whether they've helped you in your career with you as a person. I you know, any genres fair game, but here's if anything stands out. Yes, so, oh, I terrible, I'm blinking on the name of the book. I actually when I first came to nouns that I hired an executive coach. I worked with her for almost a year and she gave me a book and I cannot remember the exact title the name, but it's essentially about going back to being nice. So it's about it's essentially I think it's called like Nice. You don't have to like Nice. Women still finish for something like that, but it's essentially about using your kindness to your advantage. I think that, especially as a woman in leadership, and I won't generalize, but I tend to be very empathetic, I tend to be very kind and sometimes I feel like that can be a short fall for me, and so what I really worked with her on and what this book really helped me with was actually using that to my advantage and it talks about how you can do that without necessarily being a pushover or feeling like you're not standing your ground or feel like you're working a hundred hours because you're too, you know, nervous to ask for something. I will get you that book, but I would say and the last two years that has that has really helped change my career and it's something that I actually always recommend to female leaders on my team and other women that I'm talking to and girls in tech. I love that. Yeah, we will. Will get the full name. will put it in the in the show notes. How about any I'm not sure if you're a podcast listener or a blog reader or on Linkedin, but anything that you've been getting into that in any of those realms that have helped you recently that you've been kind of binging on. Yes, so I am, obviously you know, I'm in revenue collective, or pavilion now, and so I love Sam Jacobs podcast. I listened to it in the morning while I'm getting ready, and so usually I will focus in on what is top of mind for me. So I'll usually scroll through. When I was building out, I had never built a CSM or account management organization. That was completely new to me. So I listen to a lot of his podcasts that were featuring different folks last fall and I actually ended up connecting with some of those folks through pavilion, which really helped me and setting my mindset for building a team that I had never done before at a stage that was brand new to me as well. So I do recommend if you, you know, are a new you know building your career in sales, definitely joining an organization like pavilion, like rev genius, and really getting your hands on those materials. Absolutely, and Sam Jacobs is just a genius. Is So what great. It's fun being in New York with him. Yeah, it's cool. It's not of being across the country. Yeah, very cool. What goes on in the Rachel May's headphones. Music Wise, oh my gosh, I'm so I really love everything. Being from California, I really love like like old school wrap, like Dr Dre is probably I oh yeah, all the time. My team laughs at me because sometimes, you know, I'll come in and I have my air pods in and I'm getting I'm getting hyped. I usually will do like a podcast in the morning. Why I'm getting ready and then I actually take the ferry to work, which is beautiful, and when I get off the ferry I usually start kind of getting into the groove and getting ready to go. And my team sometimes they're walk there like your your headphones are so loud right now, like I'm hiding in the day. Let's go. You got to. You got to, especially...

...like in a sales roll, I mean getting the mind right in the morning. However, you got to do that, if it's a podcast, if it's music, if it's a work out, whatever it is, like, you got to get there somehow. So I'm with you on the Dr Dre, the snoop all that. I love it. Okay, here's a new rapid fire that we're testing out. If you had to have dinner with one salesperson, dead or alive. WHO WOULD IT BE? Oh my gosh, one sales person. Then I'd probably go with the wolf of will street. I would. I actually just watch that movie the other day, the end of it. It was on TV and got bad. The the beginning scenes when he is getting into you know, selling penny stocks or whatever it was, is just incredible and you can see, which I've seen with so many reps, you see that light bulb go on in his in his mind, as soon as he understands, which he is not being honest, but as soon as he understands what he needs to do in order to be successful. And I think just understanding and picking his brain on living through that time, I think would be absolutely incredible. That's the humble bragg the most downloaded podcast for episode of this podcast Adam on like three or four years ago and it was, oh my God, wild. Yeah, it was. Well, yeah, yeah, I saw him once at a restaurant and hadn't reach and I didn't say anything, but we were at tables right next to each other and I was like, oh my gosh, there is you. You must have been dining well. I mean I can only imagine the spots he's going too, so that's awesome. So I'd love to know what's WHO's one person that you want to see come on next for the millennial sales podcast? You are putting me on the spot here. Yeah, one person that I would love to see. I'd actually love my old manager at yelped that I referenced a couple time, Emily Mer, and she is an incredible human being. She not only has built our career Saunder, but her and her husband have actually started this organization called Russem investments, and I'll let her so or thunder tell you all about it as a side hustle where they're essentially buying and purchasing property all over the country, and you'll I'll let her tell you, but it's really incredible. And on top of that, she has moved to Hawaii during the pandemic. She's also a yoga instructor and holds retreats all over the world and she is gonna lot to go it on. I know, I know, I we are the same age, but I look up to her like she is one of the most incredible and she's also just a great friend and just a wonderful person to be around. So I can't say enough good things about her and she's also just a boss. So I would absolutely I would absolutely recommend you have her on. That's awesome. I will be definitely hitting her up after this. My last rapid fire for you. What's one thing that you like to do outside of work to kind of recharge? Yes, we talked about this a little bit this morning. I'm a big runner. I love to be outside. I live right now. I live right on the East River, so I run along the river here. When I lived in San Francisco, I always tried to live somewhere flat so that I had access to good running trails. It's something I started when I was very young, a girl playing so her. So when I'm running, that is my that is my me time, that is my place. I also always run alone for that reason, so that's that's my favorite thing to do to kind of reset. Yeah, plus one to that. Before we head out, I do want to give an opportunity. I know you're really involved with the girls in Tech New York, so I'd love to hear you talk a little bit about what that organization does and you know who it benefits and what you're doing with them. Yeah, absolutely, so I joined the girls in Tech Board about a year ago. I wanted to get involved in some sort...

...of women in technology organization. When I moved out to New York I was very involved in women and transportation, women in electric vehicles in San Francisco, and so is something I wanted to replicate here. Something that I've noticed the further and further that I've gotten in my career is that there's less and less women. I would say Yelp I had women managers, I had women leaders, I had women on my team. I don't think that I've worked closely. I haven't had a female leader since I left Yelp and the amount of women that I've had on my team has gotten smaller and smaller and I think a big piece of that there. There's a multitude of reasons that goes into that, but I'm very passionate about changing that. So interviewed to be on the girls in Tech Board. Joined last July and really our mission is to get women excited and involved in technology. So we had actually an event this March for sales, specifically women that wanted to their change careers and get into sales or get into technology for the first time and I think what ends up happening is very similar to me. I was in marketing, I was in the beverage industry, I was much e I was, you know, at the beginning of my career at that time, so it wasn't as scary to make the jump into tack or to take a step back, even though at that time I felt like I was taking a step back. And so it's really benefiting those women in the you know, mostly the Tristate area, that are interested in getting into technology. So I help. What my position is is I work with large organizations that want to get involved in either host events, we do hackathons. You can get involved and have and have access to our job boards so we can post, you know, different positions that you're hiring for. And again, it's a it's a global organization, so there's chapters all over the world and their mission is to really get women more involved in technology and feel like they have, you know, a safe haven in a safe place, in a community built here. So all the women on the board are mentors. We take on several mentees of quarter to be able to coach and work with to help them, you know, excel in their careers in tech. Yeah, that's amazing. Well, Rachel, it's been great to have you on here your story. Before we let you go, just let us know. Like you know, folks want to connect with you. We're the best places to do that. Any other final words? I don't know if you're still hiring and scaling, but could be a good time to plug that to but anything else that you have to to share the audience. Yeah, we are absolutely still hiring and scaling all over the country. We are hiring for mid market as enterprise is bed ours, SC ours marketing for just about everything. We are hiring for right now. We are going to double in size before the end of the year. Linkedin's definitely the best place to reach me, or you can email me at Rachel Dot may is. It now stadcom happy to answer any questions that you have. Or Rachel Dot may is at girls intact dot org is also another way. And Yeah, and it was. It was great being on. I've been really excited to be on the podcast with you, Tom for quite some time. This is, you know, incredible and I think the more resources that we have for folks to get excited about their sales careers and help them off level is great, so having to be a part of it awesome. Thanks so much for coming on, Rachel. Thanks him all right. Thanks for checking that episode out. This was brought to you by contract book. Contract Books Digital Contract Management Platform allows scaling businesses to automate and manage the entire contract life cycle in one flow. Get started for free at contract bookcom. Will be back next week with another episode piece.

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