The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 159: Take the Internship in Iowa w/ Jess Bahr

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 159: Take the Internship in Iowa w/ Jess Bahr

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. I'm your host Brandon martin you are listening to Is this a good time the show where I put Pavilion members in the hot seat for 15 minutes. We hear their incredible stories, shows around Tuesdays and Thursdays. Hit subscribe. Do not miss hearing from our experts. Our guest today is just far she is the senior Director of growth and analytics of NS one out of Chicago and we talk about take the internship in Iowa some fun stories from her about how she got to where she is this month sponsors Sandoz. So Sandoz, so the leading sending platform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey by connecting digital and physical strategies. Companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than ever. Ever before. All right, Let's do this episode 77. Is this a good time? All right. I'm so excited, excited to have jess bar with me. She is the Senior Director of Growth and analytics at NS one which also could be pronounced some other way that I don't really understand. That's fine, jess. So great to have you on the pod. Thank you glad to be here. Thank you for having me. We'll all meet No fellow, we jump right in. I want to know about this role. Tell us about what you're doing, you know, and then a little bit about how you got there. You have a pretty incredible kind of resume here. Would love to hear some of the stops along the way. Yeah, I have a weird background being honest. It's not traditional. So currently senior director growth in analytics said on this one. What that means is I am responsible for demand revenue generation across the go to market side also, how do we understand what we're doing? So analytics reporting that whole, that whole side of it. I like data, we're friends, I did a master's in it, so it's kind of my my jam but kind of a weird path here. So kind of my first like pure marketing job really...

...and everyone will have an intern or someone who will say you know, I want to do your job, how do I get there? Like I studied industrial engineering and I started my career redesigning production lines so that is not that is not the advice to get to where you are. Maybe not but I feel like I I use that in my day to day because really at the core what I do is I come into B two B tech companies that I helped build something that's revenue driving and I helped that scale, I build a high performing team to run it and I help it scale as the company scales and at the core it's building process, building structure and building repeatability so that you can, you can build something. So you know, starting that I was designing production lines and realized I could do the same kind of stuff on a website where I'm building an interface where someone is doing what I want them to do without me telling them what to do and I could make money at it and I'm not in a factory for 12 hours a day now granted I did have my own bathroom because I was the only woman in the factory, but um, you know, it's nice not to go home and have and my nose for the next three days. So yeah, jumped in, launched a company in college, went pretty well ended up selling it because I just recognized that I wasn't quite ready to be running a company yet. Oh, so what any particular moment that made you realize that I think, I think a lot of people, I talked to a lot of college students that are literally starting their own companies and most of them probably need to have this realization that they need about five more years of experience before doing it. Like I'm psyched for people's entrepreneurship, but like, come on, yeah, so I was, it's a great question. I was working out of a coworking space and I had a couple of friends that I've made who are also working there who had gone through incubators and I was talking about what they're doing, how they're, you know, position because like everyone uh back it back in those years, it's a lot easier, I think to get into these with...

...any idea you had everything was disruptive. These are like the pre Uber days and I've seen that, I was like, man, you know, I'm looking at their pitch decks and look at the evaluation and I built a media company with a student friend of mine. We had realized pretty early into our internships, there weren't a lot of resources for interns and so we just took what we were doing, which was really a support group once a week of a bunch of interns together and started turning into content and then we realized that we could put ads on our content and make money and that we could actually charge like resume writers who were selling their services to other students and we just take a chunk of in so we just found all these ways to kinda monetize these little moving part and we had a pretty good deck together, I would say, we were thinking about going to an incubator and getting some funding for it and I was talking to other people who had gone through some accelerators and one had just been accepted to Techstars, which at the time he was like second or third class into it. And I was looking, I was like, hold on like, am I ready to run a company like what? And I said this moment, I'm like, and I'll say going into this, I had turned down a rotational development program at Bank of America to run my company instead. And I was like, you know, I can go in blind and I'm sure I'll build a great board of directors and I have people tap into, but like, do I really want to do this? Do I really want to be like the ceo that doesn't really know what they're doing and maybe it's imposter syndrome talking that has to, you know, kind of figured out on their own and then I'll do is repeat that. Like what if I took a step back and found a role at a startup that was growing where I could help, I could be a part of that growth and then take all that and use that to eventually launch my own company and learn from him. And so I, I had explored um selling the company and I had put it up for a couple of days and I had a really nice offering and so I was like, you know what, that's it, like I'm, I'm going to hang on my hat for a little while, I'm going to go make my way into the, you...

...know, the VC backed startup world and I'm going to get a little more experience and then I can always revisit it. I love that. Look, I mean, I think, I think the thing people are supposed to say is go hustle and go like, you know, but tamp down the imposter syndrome, which I totally agree with, but also seems like when you're getting out of school, that is a good time for you to take roles that are just exploratory rather than trying to pin yourself down as like, I mean My God, I didn't have the maturity when I was in my early 20s to to run a company, you know, some might argue, I don't have it today, fine. But but you know, I think there's other, there's other things you learn, you build a network and I respect it when people can say, look, I'm in it for the long game, it's a very I worked with Gary V for a number of years, it's a very Gary V thing to be like just like keep eating ship, there's the long games of thing, don't try to I'm cashing on your, you know, whatever you're trying to immediately play the long anyway. Yeah. Yeah. I mean like hustle culture is real and a lot of people are just like, oh like you're selling out, like listen, there's no shame in being employed, There's no shame. I think there's, you know, if you got a job that you're working for 30 years, you're not learning, you're not growing, you're not doing anything like that's a different story. But like there's so much you can learn. I tell you I took that I decided I'm gonna go get employed, I was like, Alright can either, I'm really good at designing production lines. I was good at that stuff, I can do that process engineering. You know, make 110,000 a year starting out or I can I can go and what I really want those. I want experience in the customer facing the marketing side. That's what I think I really need to hone in on at some B2B venture back company. And so I took half that pay moved to new york city with, I moved in with a guy that I met on twitter. We're still friends to this day. I grew up in Wisconsin, right? So moved to new york city for this job that doesn't pay shit to go get experience, right? And that's what I...

...did and leverage that to get the next roll to get the next role and currently, you know, again senior director, right? I'm employed when I came in. Like I'm I'm open with everyone that eventually I'm going to start my own company. I will eventually found a company probably something solving marketing attribution analytics, but I know what it looks like yet, but I'll get there again. You know, it is that kind of long game and I'm fine. I find me in the first time Ceo and like my forties or fifties like that's I don't need to be a senior you seen on my 20's. I'm fine with that. You should be. That's that's totally fair. And by the way, I'm ready to angel invest when you're ready to raise. Let's go All right, give me 20 seconds on what your favorite marketing stack is right now because this is a lot of question I ask everyone to reveal what you work with, but like I feel like you have an answer here, I got to say or what you want to just promote hubspot for everything, Okay. And it's kind of people like, oh yeah, hub spots a de facto but I have a couple of friends that are early, early stage companies that are cr oh, positions you can do hubspot for everything, have your sales team and hubspot have everyone in hubspot, one ecosystem, all the apps you need everything, they're super easy to spot for everything hubspot. Alright. Number number two though, Gold cast. Just wanted a runner up shout out for that best event event platform ever seen for me to be. All right. Gold check it out. You don't even know it, but I'm not, you know, like I would. All right, look, I'm sure in your career, luck and hard work of both contributed any little stories of either one of those kind of people. Yeah, so I also, I kind of laugh at it because I have a sign in my kitchen that says fuck luck and very much I think like the more opportunity it's a life is a numbers game, the more you do, the more opportunities to succeed, the further you're going to get. But my first internship ever, which I think formed my entire life as it is. I was an air culture engineering technology major which is uh not quite...

...an engineering degree but not quite like two year mechanics degree. It's like in between. And I was like I'm going to go in turn and I started putting internships and everyone's like you're not qualified we hire engineering students like stop like don't apply for this. Uh And my advice is don't you're not an engineer, don't apply to engineering internships. I'm like I'm gonna I'm gonna get one. I put an idea, spreadsheet over 100 applications. I put up one company called me and they call me because they're looking at expanding their their internship program. They got there in Iowa they got most their interns from the university of Iowa. They wanted to expand, its like we're going to take you but just so you know like you're with a bunch of engineering students and it doesn't quite look like you got the coursework or qualify for them like I'll take it right And I went there and I worked my ass off and I would go home every night after work and I would read because I had no clue what they were talking about half the time you as an internship in Iowa yeah internship in Iowa vermeer manufacturing like seventh generation family owned company and I did really well. And so I used that to the next internship I got which was a process engineering internship which paid more than my grandfather had ever gone paid at any job when he was working and I got it, I got it because I had the first internship and I had tangible experience that produced results. Again, I'm there this like tech kid, not an engineering student with all these engineering students and that's what I use. And I used that internship to get the next internship eventually finished with industrial engineering and supply chain management for underground, I switched schools, we don't have engineering at the school, I want to, but it was like completely unqualified. I was like, you know what, I don't care, I'm going to do it. Oh God, Well let me tell you, you're gonna have, you're gonna have a fun time raising money because basically the story you just described is it is a spreadsheet of you know, knocking on doors and if there's somebody in Iowa with your seed, your seed round, you're going to go find it. I love it. Well look, any marketing...

...tactics that you would kind of want to share, you probably have a ton what's something that when you talk to a company, they're completely overlooking, You know, in terms of their efficiencies or process so low hanging fruit is seeing marketing as a revenue center that can drive money. Like there's so many companies that still don't value marketing that don't track anything that don't have analytics. But what I would say aside from that is having everything be holistic so I can give you an example when I came into M. S. One, we had really silent marketing programs and by just saying listen our event program, everything for events. We're going italian other things. So if you come into our database from an event, you're not just going to get a thanks for stopping by the booth, you're going to get a follow up email based on the content that you're likely to engage with based on the speakers and you're gonna get retargeted based on that. And hey, even going to a conference, we're going to target you on twitter with advertisements for our speakers that are there and taking every activity that you have and making it part of a larger, not even an integrated campaign but an integrated effort because that's how you start finding these efficiencies where you can get one and one to equal three, you can get so much more out of it when you approach everything is being holistic instead of these separate marketing functions, battling for budget, battling for power that aren't working with each other. Yeah. Love it. Alright, cool. That's great. And um, any positions you're hiring for B. D. R. Manager, BDR Director of BDR Development, just forget the title name, but if you like developing future, you know, sales leaders of the world at the BDR stage come to NS one because I need a counterpart on the sales side. Love it. And any shout outs, I know you give a shout out to a product, any people that you, you appreciate what they are. I have to give a shout out to kate law, my event prison actually who recently joined pavilion, she's a new member, so shout out to her, I'm excited for her to start diving into that world. Gold cast, huge fan of up and comers I would...

...say in the event space just came out a few years ago. They're doing a lot of really innovative things. If you're in the B two B side and you need your event program to be a tool that you can use for your sales to prospect during the event to prove actual value and pulling our oh I, it is the best platform that you can use out there for it. So gold cast, I'm all about making money. I got to figure out what the sponsors say, they're probably be pissed. All good. I think it's endo so they're not doing events that there. I got my guys, that's great. Well look, you know, all of those questions are for everybody else and for me, I ask people one question that I care most about, which is where should I go eat? Um, you can go to new york, you're based in Chicago, right? So I am now is in new york for a long time, I have to go to new york, My favorite place, like I will fly there for lunch is Delmonico's steakhouse in new york city. The original Delmonico's down in financial district is just my mouth waters, thinking about their stuff. So good. Favorite place. Every time I'm in town, go there for lunch. Favorite place, I love it. Very classic. You've got to go two blocks over at some point. Go to Harry's Harry's as well. Harry's steak. Also a classic like Wall street type of, a little different in terms of opulence, but my guy Pete runs it there and he's the best. Anyway, yes, awesome to have you on. Thank you so much, incredible to hear your story and hustle to get where you are. And uh again, I'm ready. Angel investment, You are awesome. Love it. Thanks for having me. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review the apple podcast. Spotify out, send it to some friends and make sure to smash that. Subscribe button reminder. This episode is brought to you by some dough. So they deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make your outreach more personal. I had so much fun today. Hope you did too. Now go precious...

...numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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