The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Ep 139: Surrendering the Outcome w/ Jacob Warwick

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 139: Surrendering the Outcome w/ Jacob Warwick

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon martin, you're listening to Is this a good time the show where I asked Pavilion members some questions they answer. It's a lot of fun. We really shows on Tuesdays and Thursdays hit subscribe. So you do not miss hearing from our experts and we certainly have one today. Jacob Warwick is with me, he is the Chief Growth Officer Advisor and he is a leadership expert. We talk about surrendering the outcome. It's really cool tidbits in here. I can't wait for you to listen to. This episode was brought to you by insight square advanced revenue analytics and forecasting for today's B two B organizations. Your revenue team wakes up every day with questions insight square, it gives you the data driven answers in real time. Get 350 out of the box reports and dashboards cell service. No coat. All right, let's do this episode 64 Is this a good time? Alright, I am here with Jacob Warwick, he is the Chief Growth Officer Advisor. Jacob so great to have you on the pod. Brandon happy to be here. Thanks man. Well look, I'll meet no fellow, we jump right in with the questions. Give us your current role. Tell us about what you do and how you got here your background. Yeah. So currently I'm the Chief growth officer Advisor, which is a fancy fancy title for saying you do everything but leading engineering team, it's a little bit of a mix between product as well as growth sales marketing, customer success revenue type things a little bit easier when the team size relatively small but eventually we'll scale out to be a much larger role essentially we're helping product managers work with their gear data better and providing them a more flexible stimulus spreadsheet type experience and I mentioned I'm still working on my elevator pitch there and part of the challenge in this role is to build out the messaging and core concepts of that from the very get go where a series heading into series A so that's about how early were at there. I...

...got this role have been a founder of my own company in the past, discovered podium for about three years before that held multiple executive marketing positions in Silicon Valley, some notables at buddy schedule. Oh, clear voice and so on. And let's go back to some of the earlier stuff. I mean you were you've been an adviser in a lot of different ways which I love. I think this is just a product of being in Silicon Valley and being smart. Probably right like you get asked, can you come advise this and that. I mean you have listed things like advisor to under armour and Uber and so forth. Talk a little bit about that in your, you know, not too distant past here. Yeah, a lot of it started as contract roles here and there. You always sometimes take on side hustles or side roles to ensure your longevity and financial independence while working in Silicon Valley marketing is often last a higher first to fire. So you want to protect yourselves particularly in a startup environment where you're not entirely sure whether the startup will be successful or not. Certainly been a part of several that were on rocky terrain that have gone through big transitions and when you live in a place that's as expensive as Silicon Valley, you need to protect yourself. So I started doing some moonlighting very early in my career and a lot of freelance writing and that got me into meet some great people and companies that I probably had no business working at. I got into under armour by starting a health blog writing series with my fitness pal and my fitness pal was acquired into under armour. And when I started doing some, my first contracts, my very first kind of vendor relationship was with under armour, which is a pretty cool first check to have pin type and that's how some of those things started. Same with Uber. I got in with Uber with their content marketing team and started developing content for them and then working on some of the content strategy for a smaller division within Uber. So a lot of fun stuff that kind of stemmed from that. Would you suggest this to kind of...

...young marketers listening, would you say, hey, get out there and do you have a side hustle? If you will take something you're passionate about start writing about it. Have a blog, have a, have a newsletter, get a sub stack any of those things. Is that something you'd suggest? Probably not detective, I guess the older and more experienced I get, the more I value doing a little bit less and trying to get some of that mental clarity back to spend more time with family, be more present in the now kind of thing versus my early twenties and mid twenties was just all hustle all the time to make a name for myself. Sure it's been, it's been very valuable and accelerating my career trajectory and my knowledge and, and having that mentality of always learning. But at the same time I sacrificed on a lot of things in my early twenties that I probably should have taking advantage of? So let me put you on the spot. Let me put, yeah, well let me put you on the spot. What is the right balance and what, what, what advice would you give? Somebody? You know, early twenties has a good job, how, you know, this is something that I toy with as well. We're probably around the same age and, and it was just a bunch of putting 100 hour weeks and hustle your ass off in your twenties so that you had, you know, okay, in successful thirties and now I'm in my forties, right? The question is, what is the advice you give to young people today that that doesn't stick to that hustle culture bullshit? Well, it's really about, you know, that that weird saying that everyone says it's always nice to have, they say, you know, if you, if you work doing something that you love, you'll never work a day in your life and every time you say that you're like, okay, but in the real world, is that really bullshit, right? Because how many people can stand up marketing a spreadsheet and say, I just absolutely care and I'm passionate about spreadsheets and they build their career on that. And to some extent, I've done that too. There are other elements that you need to cling to that can both afford your lifestyle lifestyle that you're trying to create...

...as well as drive some of the things that you're passionate about, so in some cases you will be more passionate about the team that you develop in the report you build with others. And that's something that I've really found is I enjoy the relationships of working through through Silicon Valley, mostly a relationship based business. I get a little lost in the heavy administrative things or the really nitty gritty marketing tactical things start to turn me off a little bit. So my advice is to find something that you truly enjoy spending time with and of course this is much easier said than done and then you can choose to double down on that because sometimes you get heads down in some work in six hours goes by and you don't even recognize it's just a blink of an eye. Then other things you'll, you'll start to work on a project that you're a little uneasy about And it will feel like it's been six hours and you look, and it's been 10 minutes, you have a deadline and it feels like it's either time is moving exceptionally slow or it's just eating at you in some way. So you don't want to grind for the sake of grind or hustle for the sake of hustling. You want to you really want to spend that time doing something that's going to provide something more meaningful in your life. And that's again, it's it's much easier said than done because that individual nuances different for the individual themselves. Yeah, for sure. For sure. I like that. Well look, we talk a lot about, you know, people getting places because of both hard work and luck. Do you have a story of either that kind of from your past and you want to share about, you know, propelling your career forward. You kind of talked a little bit about the hard work side and having multiple side hustles and advisory stuff. But yeah, there were a couple of things that somewhere luck, somewhere hard work kind of combined. I entered the space, having not gone to college and I just happened to graduate high school, right? When the economy took its most recent collapse. like this was back in 2000 and eight and you could either take that as well. That's unfortunate you're entering the job market at the worst time ever and you don't have a college education, good luck kid or you can take it like I did which there was...

...a lot of mid and senior level folks who are out of work That that job still needed to get done and I was there at the right time to be able to pick up some of those skills and take jobs that I had no business in getting at a very early age. I built a custom crm at 18, I didn't even know that they were called crm at the time we were building soho campaigns and sales enablement marketing automation at 8 50 an hour just doing stuff like that, which most people would scoff at like you can't do that for $8 an hour and that's ridiculous. I didn't know any better, I just got into roles that I had no business doing. And the other kind of core theme in my life that went really well for me is that Lincoln started taking shape right at the same time, I get started catching fire around 2000 and 8, 2010 ish and I was ahead of the curve on that and I started connecting with people that had the jobs that I thought I wanted. So when I was a marketing manager, I connected with directors of marketing in Silicon Valley in new york and Seattle and every major hub when I was a director of marketing, I connected with VPs and then when I was a VP I started directing with the C suite or connecting with them. And so I matched my linked in trajectory with my career very well and the people that I made connections with very early are now in those director V. P. And C suite roles. So my network is very expansive and one of the luckiest moments I got, I remember I was laid off one day and in the same day that was a small startup I was working for, that was part of a big big layoff within the same day I got contacted by a marketing consultant named bryan Hawn Igman out in new york city and he wrote for new york times, the next web entrepreneur Forbes, he had this kind of very large market and he was looking for someone to help him scale his writing and he tapped into me to do that because we had connected on linkedin and because I happened to have been a marketing manager at the time, there was a lot of serendipity that came in there from some of the hard work I did and I got to double my...

...compensation that day and suddenly I started writing about marketing to marketers about marketing which helped me learn more about marketing, which exponentially grew my skill set And then I was suddenly published an entrepreneur and Forbes and then my career really blew up and I was 24 so it was very fortunate that brian found me at that moment, he believed in me and trusted me too learn how to write like he writes a seasoned professional, do it very quickly and it was some of the hardest work that I have ever done. I remember spending 12 hours on an article and crying because brian kicked my ass was a red line, red line, red line, red line like this doesn't make any sense, this is you know cognitive dissonance, you don't know how to like and I was just all these emotions of self doubt started hitting me and he worked with me through that and helped me become more competent and understanding and that was a very fortunate scenario and you know there are a couple of situations like that where if I had mentors that have gotten really done what I feel is a lot of the hard work for me, I love that, I love that I love the idea of somebody reaching down and pulling you up with them that that that's amazing and I and I know that you do that as well, you know you have a lot of time that you spend with other leaders and and even as an executive, you know or the chair of the leadership portion of Pavilion, I wonder in any of that, do you have any um you know, kind of shake my next question and kind of switch it a little bit. Usually asking for like a tactic on marketing or anything like that. But like I would even be open to just like general leadership advice that you think people should be considering on a daily or weekly basis. The # one motto that I have that has gotten me through at least two today is it does well in my personal life too, but it's always provide more value than you expect in return. And I don't remember who it was that told me that, but I was young when I heard it and it took me a while to really understand what that meant because especially when you're younger...

...you're like, well what value do I have to give right? Like you don't really know what it is yet. So it's not necessarily that you always have that value to give, but you're always seeking to provide more and more, particularly when it when it comes back to you. Like I have another outcome. Another saying that I have which has surrendered the outcome, which means do the work that you have to do. And then everything that is an external circumstance that you can't control. Don't worry about it. So this is really popular when it comes to be DRS like you do the work that you have to do. and if somebody flips you off and tells you don't want to talk to you, you surrender that outcome because somebody does want to talk to you next call. Exactly yeah, same with networking, it's it's surrender the outcome. So I'll reach out to people and I'll text them and I don't expect them to text me back. Sometimes I'll just say like hey Brandon was thinking about you heard your podcast the other day, I hope you're doing well. I don't care if you message me back or not, I would always message you back. Jacob. Everyone on the pod knows well my heart, I appreciate that and that's that's you providing some value back, right? But the point that I'm making is that I will do what needs to be done regardless of my past history of success with that, regardless of whether whether or not you have like sometimes I'll have four text messages in a row that I haven't heard back on. It doesn't mean I stopped thinking about somebody. I always keep trying to provide value and I don't take these things personally. So great. I love I love it man, this is a great piece of advice a little different than where we usually go, but so valuable, I think we talked often a lot about you know, things like networking and and pulling people up and mentoring and stuff and I just love the idea to not expect anything back that you know in my world, that's true hospitality. You're trying to give and, and hope for somebody else to have a great experience without anything wanting in return. So super cool. All right, well look, let's go speed around a little bit. Um, you know, what are some things or is there any positions that you're hiring for? You should say? Yeah, we're just getting in the loop for likely hiring a BDR pretty...

...soon, probably a product manager and maybe even a growth marketing manager. So these are on the dockets and we're getting closer to hiring a growth engineer as well. So if any of those things strike your fancy or you know, anyone feel free to ping me on linkedin, be happy to facilitate. Amazing. And then give some shout outs. Either up and commerce or folks that folks that you appreciate the content that they put out. Yeah, there's some folks. Um, the first one that comes to mind is Megan domina and I think she's recently changed roles, but she's a marketer that I worked with back at clear voice. Again, I worked with her at buddy. I even hired her in my company. She's somebody that I've worked with who is uh, she's beyond my pay grade. She's phenomenal work. Maybe we could provide a link or whatever and then Demi season she was previously at my fitness pal and under armour and she, she was actually the person that hired me to get some of my first content published with under armour have a lot to say. She's a senior PM and all trails right now she's phenomenal. Uh, and then a couple other up and comers, uh, Soraya and she just changed her last name. So I hope to not butcher this, but it's Soraya Palmisano and she was previously a Pinterest in now doing some product marketing management work at linkedin starting here in the next month. So those are the three names, all just phenomenal female marketing leaders that are total badasses that I've learned a ton from. Yeah, I was going to point out not going to be a surprise that three women come to mind when you think of who is amazing and coming up. We often such amazing female leaders on the show and, and it makes so much sense to me. I do say something semi controversial that I truly believe in and I think that women make better marketers than men and it almost feels, it almost feels shameful to say their up and coming because I think they have, you're not in their right. But there are those three that I continually point back to love, love that, love that. Well, um, those are all the questions for everyone else. For me,...

...there's just one question that matters what restaurant we're going to. You can, you can give me any restaurant anywhere and I recognize this and I live in Montana now, Is that a new occurrences this like last last 12 months. Well, I, I have a place in incline village Nevada in addition to, so I'm like on the outskirts, so I was already four hours outside of Silicon Valley. Now I have a house in Montana as well in a town called Whitefish, I don't know the restaurants yet, so you'll catch my, myself, my wife, my two dogs at Panera bread probably two or three times a week and so I'll take you to Panera bread. I'm a humble guy and you know what? Panera bread is getting kind of expensive. So it's still a very nice meal. Let me tell you, Panera is probably what I seek out most went on the road because I'm trying to eat healthier and I know a place like Panera can do that. So like shouts of Panera, also one of the original brands that use self, self service order and chaos. So you got to love that from my side of the biz well, I, I pretend it's healthy, but I, I usually go hard on the mac and cheese or something silly that I shouldn't do. You can, you can go that direction too if you want. Uh, so it's good for the kids, Jacob great to have you on, man, I'm really looking forward to kind of hearing more like, I think that too, kind of, you know, saying that you have really resonated with me and and and psyched to just be connected then thank you brian appreciate the time. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, rate and review in the apple podcasts or Spotify apps, smash that subscribe button, send it to friends. It makes an incredible birthday gift. Just kidding reminder. This episode is brought you by Inside Squared. Say goodbye to spreadsheet, forecasting and hello to Crm data. You can trust Inside Squared delivers predictive deal scoring, unmatched visibility and inspection and advanced goal management for your entire team. Everything you need to take back control of the revenue process. I had fun today. Hope you did...

...too. Now go crush your numbers, say something. Mhm.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (229)