The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 68: Success is a Journey w/ Josh Allen

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Success is a Journey w/ Josh Allen

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello, everyone. And welcome back to the revenue collected podcast. I am your host, Brandon Martin, And you're listening to Is this a good time? The show where I asked revenue collected members some really basic questions, and they have great answers. In a short, 15 minute conversation, we really shows Tuesdays and Thursdays, and if you hit subscribe. I will make sure that an uber shows up to your house each week with the episode. Our guest today is Josh Allen zero at our labs, and we talk about how success is a journey, never a destination. This episode was brought to you by Quota Path, the commission tracking software built for sales, operations, finance and accounting teams. If running commissions in payroll has you running for the hills, quota path is for you. Quote a path helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay their teams accurately and on time every time. Keep your team motivated and on target. Simplify your commissions at quota path dot com slash revenue Dash collective and give your reps the gift of transparent. All right, let's do this Episode 2 to 22 Is this a good time? All right, I am here with Josh Allen. He is the C r o of our labs based out of Boston, one of the original founding members of the Revenue collective in Boston. Josh, super psyched to have you on. Yeah. Thank you, Brenda. That's very, very good to be here. I'm excited for this. This will be fun. Good, Good. Well, I I know you have a pretty cool career. I've used a couple of your products in the past, so kind of fun to to hear about from the inside out. As much as you can talk about, we jump right in all meat, no fillers. So give us a sense of how you got to where you are in this role at our labs and the path you took to get here. Yeah, it's, um it's admittedly it sort of started by accident. I think like many of us who have ended up in the sales world, it was for me. It was it was a means to an end. It was coming out of college with a big pile of student loan debt and having to find a way to pay that...

...back. So I was I was really like I felt fortunate to fall into technology almost by accident back in in 2002, and it was originally with a company called Sofus there for for three years and really kind of learned the ropes on the sales side started out as a as a sales admin, which was kind of a fancy title for someone who got coffee for the sales people and process their orders and did all the work underneath it and then graduated into a BDR role. So I had to earn, earn the promotion, to be able to get on the phone and start making my first cold call. So kids today wanting BDR manager on day one? Yep, it's, uh, But it was What I came to love about technology was just how fast moving it was. It was a dynamic work environment, and and I think the biggest point in my career as I spent 10 years at Logmein and Logmein was was just a wonderful journey because I joined the company when it was about 40 employees and $3 million in revenue, and we didn't know what we were going to be when we grew up. And so to see it go through, go through an I p o become like a globally distributed company and have the chance to to wear lots of different hats and lots of different responsibilities. Over the course of that 10 years, you know, you feel like you get a career's worth of experience crammed into a decade. And so I think all that 10 years is really what has, I think, propelled me and and giving me almost an unfair advantage going into other companies because of all of the different experiences I had, it locked me in. I gotta ask, because I think you're one of the first people I've spoken to on the podcast that has maybe people say, 10 years in a role, but not from like a start up to an I. P. O right, like that's wild, I mean, and I mean that in somewhat of like, that strange way, right, like you must have. How many times did you consider God? I've been here for four years. God, I've been here for six years. What am I doing like? That's an incredible...

...journey, like give us some sense of sticking it out for 10 years from a $3 million start up. That's you know. Well, so, interestingly, we actually we went public three years into that journey, and and I also am a boomerang. So I did leave after five years. Um, I didn't leave for very long. I was only gone for six months because that was, like, back then. You think I know what I know what a good company looks like? I think we can go do this again somewhere else. And you realize when you're on the outside looking back at where you were, just how special and difficult it is to build a business like that. So, um, I ended up going back to logmein, and, uh, it was it was 25 year stints at Logmein. That's good. So he's back, back, And now you're out on probation. It sounds like Well, look, I'm really curious to hear your answer here. Luck and hard work both contribute to getting you where you are. Tell a story on either one. Both whatever you'd like, but would love to hear your version of this luck and hard work. Yeah, I think it's, um you know, because it was after logging in I went to car gurus for a couple of years. I went to drift for a couple of years now, about four months into my journey here at our labs. That has has been wonderful so far, and all of those environments are very different from one another There there are probably more differences than similarities. And so I think about like from a success standpoint, I think like the I think the key ingredient there is the ability to work hard across different environments but still produce positive results. And to do that across a long domain of time, meaning? You know, I do think in some ways some of the really fast growth companies where people are getting promoted every six months or 12 months. It's created sort of a a bent perspective on what time domains are, and I think like to. To sustain a high level of effort and produce results over the period of of years is really...

...important. And so for me like that, that's where, but I also I'm careful about success because to me success like being like if you were to classify yourself as successful, it's almost admitting that you're at a destination, and I just I don't I don't think that way. I think I'm very much still in the middle of this journey and, uh, and still have a lot to learn. And I learn every day from everyone around me, so not not sure I call it, uh, call it quite successful yet. And then, as for for luck, I think it's, um, when I've been luckiest is when, uh, it's the relationships with people have built in the different companies I have worked at. And so when you think about getting a new job, finding a new place to work, hiring the great people around you like, I just hired a VP of marketing who I worked with, uh, two jobs ago, who's amazing. She's wonderful, like that's That's what makes you lucky. That's what helps you build these great companies, like those relationships and all the sliding doors moments. That probably happened to have hard joined the company company to companies ago. And then you got Yeah, I often I love working with people I've worked with in the past, and sometimes it's like that you work better together. People think you work better together because of the positive things. I think I'm probably not the easiest person to work with. And they know how to get around that, like, you know how to compensate for my faults, right? Like that's what I think is best about it. It's true. It's the situation I'm in now. Frank Y. Soft, our CEO. Here at our labs. He and I worked closely together car gurus. And so when you can come together and you have, like, trust is established, so you can you can both just get to work and know what the other is going to do and have very transparent, honest conversations with each other where you don't hurt each other's feelings because you already know how you're going to operate. That's a thing of beauty, too. Have teammates like and you know how to push somebody right?...

Like you know where to press were not too. It's, uh, a lot, a lot that goes into that. I love it Well, look, you know you have tons of tons of years, including all all the time adrift. You must really know how to get people to respond to something when you want to. When they get to your website. But what would like a tactic be that you could offer to to the folks that they may be able to, like, use tomorrow in a deal? Yeah, I'd say, um, what I learned at drift more than anything was just how underrepresented High conversion was on your website. And I think for most technology companies, your website is your primary domain, especially now that we're in the midst of the pandemic. More people are focused on the digital transformation of their businesses they're focused on. I'm using their website to be able to convey their message and ultimately market and sell their products. And so I think tactically, if you're on the sales side and you're not using something like a drift to be able to process more of that traffic that's coming in and converted into leads, like, do you think about all of the time and effort and money and resources that go into driving eyeballs to your website? Yeah. And if 99% of them are leaving without ever having told you who they are or what they do or why they were potentially interested, it's just opportunity lost. And so yeah, I think that that's certainly a tactic there. I would say, like for those for those in your audience who are who are on the sales side of things, this is a little less of a tactic and probably more of a career. Bit of strategic advice is to know we we don't we don't want strategic. No, I'm just kidding. Give only strategic advice. But I do like because it's it's important that you know the company, like drift in our labs, that car gurus that log me in like the reason I chose those companies worse because they all they all offered a product that, frankly, I felt, was...

...the best in the market that had a differentiated message. And it was it was the premier player in the market. If you're going to be in a sales role and you're gonna stake half of your earnings on your ability to sell a product and market, I would go out of my way to make sure that you're at a company where you feel like you're either number one or you have a clear path to number one because you want to feel like every day you're talking about your product. You have full belief in it because if you don't have full belief in it, that comes through on the other end, the buyer. The buyer sees that if if you don't believe that your product is number one, so I just I think that above everything else is what makes somebody successful in sales is that they have full belief in what they're what they're putting out there because they believe they're solving a problem. I like that. Yeah, I I definitely subscribe to this. I've always been involved in in restaurant related software and, like my goal has always been to help restaurants straight away. And so if the software that I'm selling doesn't help, restaurants can't do it. By the way, I want to make sure you say this. Tell us what our labs does, because I don't think we set it up top. Yeah, so our labs and some of you may have this product in your in your offices or if you have kids, they may have it in their schools in their classrooms, but it's essentially an all in 1, 360 degree camera speaker microphone. It's a product that our founders created out of a need because they saw that. You know, if you're talking 1 to 1, this is okay. A webcam is okay. But when you have a group setting and you have different people that are talking to one another, we wanted to create a more immersive meeting experience. So we built this camera that responds to the people in the room. So if you have multiple speakers, it will show them on your screen. So if you are a remote participant, you still feel immersed in the meeting because you can see people's body language, you understand who's doing what in the room. And we...

...just We wanted to get out of this world of, uh, of like the bowling lane for video conference and offer a complete immersive solution. So and we're continuing to build products that support what we've built in the meeting. I'll pro so we can create a more full room solution for our customers. Well, now, more than ever, because even even though we're all, like separate right now and probably by the time I hope by the time we're broadcasting this it's a little less true. But you and I were chatting before on sites. They're going to be the new off sites. You're gonna do them once a month and and you might have, you know, the on site in Toronto and the on site in New York match up and have multiple people in the room needing to have this conversation together. It just makes total sense. And the other thing I'd add there that's changed because of the pandemic is that a lot of companies have gone from being super hub focused in their headquarters. So now they're just hiring the best fit for the business, no matter where they are located. So chances are, even if you have a hub for your office and you go in there and meet with part of your team, there's always going to be at least one participant who is not based around the Hub anymore and his remote that is part of your team. So I do think the way the world will go back to work has changed completely. Well, it's funny. I just realized buying this as a company. It's not for the group, it's for that person. It's to make the remote person feel more connected. Exactly. That's very cool. That's very cool. Well, look, I got a couple more questions speed around. We'll get them in quick. Anything you're hiring for that we should know about. Yeah. I mean, the big ones. This year, we have had some some nice organic growth internationally outside of the US with our lab. So we're going to hire general managers for Europe and for for a pack. So those are big. Those are the big hires that I'm focused on in the first half of the year. Cool here for sure. Maybe we'll find some people in the audience good and then give some shout outs, both both people who you admire and follow and listen to their messages...

...and then others who are like up and comers. I'm going to give a shout out to our internal team who has put out this state of remote work, which is worth it for anyone who is listening. That's trying to figure out, like what the return to office is going to look like. It's wonderful research and I think is very relevant to our time here. So take a look at that, I think, for great for great sales content, like if you're looking for people who put out good stuff. J. Webb from J. Davis Group. He's awesome. He's a really good interview of people. I think he does a nice job on his podcast, and he's been very active in the sales world for a long time. That's a must listen, Devin read, who posts a lot of stuff from Gone on LinkedIn, And it's all like quantified tactical and actionable pieces for for sales reps for sales leaders. Really good stuff there. He's got some good content. I highly recommend it. Yeah, awesome. And then and then up and comers who should be keeping an eye out for Yeah, I'm gonna I'm going to give a shout there to a couple people on my team. We have our senior manager channel sales here, and Kylie Kenny. She's an up and comer who's really helping to build a pretty special channel sales program at our labs. Kailyn McNamara is the other sales leader we have internally. She's senior manager of our direct sales team, so she has the account executives. The account manager is the SDRs, and both of them have been so impressive as young leaders and the teams that they're building out and their management style. The other one is somebody who I worked with that both logmein and drift. His name is Dakota Green. He is a very special, not just sales leader, but overall leader of people who's gonna. He's gonna run very big team someday. That's cool. That's cool. And I love that we got to. Two of three of the rising stars are female. I love that More women in sales, Please, Let's get Let's get this message out...

...there. Well, you know, more importantly than all of these questions to me, is this one simple question. Give me some secret on where I should be eating. Well, if you're coming to, uh, if you're coming up here specifically, if you came to my neighborhood, I think my wife and I would take you to Davos in Lindfield, which day videos as a number of restaurants. Up here. The owner lives in our town, and he opened a restaurant a few years back when, when the local shopping area opened up. It's just, uh, it's always a good meal. It's always a great environment, and I love it good. We're going to Davos when we get up to North Boston. Right? Nor that beautiful. Well, so great to have this time with you, Josh. And I really appreciate, like, hearing about your journey, excited to continue keeping up and and seeing you in all the success for or on your path to success, I will say, for our labs. Thank you very much, Brandon. Appreciate it. Thanks, man. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please write a review in the apple podcast or Spotify app. Send it to some friends and make sure to hit that subscribe button. So you get the episodes delivered to you each week. Reminder. This episode was brought to you by quarter past quarter Path is the first radically transparent and and compensation solution from sales reps to finance. Get started for free at quarter past dot com slash revenue. Dash collective Had a lot of fun today. I hope you did too. Now go smash those numbers. Say something. Yeah,.

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