The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

Ep 68: Success is a Journey w/ Josh Allen

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Success is a Journey w/ Josh Allen

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello, everyone. And welcome back tothe revenue collected podcast. I am your host, Brandon Martin, And you'relistening to Is this a good time? The show where I asked revenue collectedmembers some really basic questions, and they have great answers. In a short,15 minute conversation, we really shows Tuesdays and Thursdays, and if you hitsubscribe. I will make sure that an uber shows up to your house each weekwith the episode. Our guest today is Josh Allen zero at our labs, and wetalk about how success is a journey, never a destination. This episode wasbrought to you by Quota Path, the commission tracking software built forsales, operations, finance and accounting teams. If runningcommissions in payroll has you running for the hills, quota path is for you.Quote a path helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay theirteams accurately and on time every time. Keep your team motivated and on target.Simplify your commissions at quota path dot com slash revenue Dash collectiveand give your reps the gift of transparent. All right, let's do thisEpisode 2 to 22 Is this a good time? All right, I am here with Josh Allen.He is the C r o of our labs based out of Boston, one of the original foundingmembers of the Revenue collective in Boston. Josh, super psyched to have youon. Yeah. Thank you, Brenda. That's very, very good to be here. I'm excitedfor this. This will be fun. Good, Good. Well, I I know you have a pretty coolcareer. I've used a couple of your products in the past, so kind of fun toto hear about from the inside out. As much as you can talk about, we jumpright in all meat, no fillers. So give us a sense of how you got to where youare in this role at our labs and the path you took to get here. Yeah, it's,um it's admittedly it sort of started by accident. I think like many of uswho have ended up in the sales world, it was for me. It was it was a means toan end. It was coming out of college with a big pile of student loan debtand having to find a way to pay that...

...back. So I was I was really like I feltfortunate to fall into technology almost by accident back in in 2002, andit was originally with a company called Sofus there for for three years andreally kind of learned the ropes on the sales side started out as a as a salesadmin, which was kind of a fancy title for someone who got coffee for thesales people and process their orders and did all the work underneath it andthen graduated into a BDR role. So I had to earn, earn the promotion, to beable to get on the phone and start making my first cold call. So kidstoday wanting BDR manager on day one? Yep, it's, uh, But it was What I cameto love about technology was just how fast moving it was. It was a dynamicwork environment, and and I think the biggest point in my career as I spent10 years at Logmein and Logmein was was just a wonderful journey because Ijoined the company when it was about 40 employees and $3 million in revenue,and we didn't know what we were going to be when we grew up. And so to see itgo through, go through an I p o become like a globally distributed company andhave the chance to to wear lots of different hats and lots of differentresponsibilities. Over the course of that 10 years, you know, you feel likeyou get a career's worth of experience crammed into a decade. And so I thinkall that 10 years is really what has, I think, propelled me and and giving mealmost an unfair advantage going into other companies because of all of thedifferent experiences I had, it locked me in. I gotta ask, because I thinkyou're one of the first people I've spoken to on the podcast that has maybepeople say, 10 years in a role, but not from like a start up to an I. P. Oright, like that's wild, I mean, and I mean that in somewhat of like, thatstrange way, right, like you must have. How many times did you consider God?I've been here for four years. God, I've been here for six years. What am Idoing like? That's an incredible...

...journey, like give us some sense ofsticking it out for 10 years from a $3 million start up. That's you know. Well,so, interestingly, we actually we went public three years into that journey,and and I also am a boomerang. So I did leave after five years. Um, I didn'tleave for very long. I was only gone for six months because that was, like,back then. You think I know what I know what a good company looks like? I thinkwe can go do this again somewhere else. And you realize when you're on theoutside looking back at where you were, just how special and difficult it is tobuild a business like that. So, um, I ended up going back to logmein, and, uh,it was it was 25 year stints at Logmein. That's good. So he's back, back, Andnow you're out on probation. It sounds like Well, look, I'm really curious tohear your answer here. Luck and hard work both contribute to getting youwhere you are. Tell a story on either one. Both whatever you'd like, butwould love to hear your version of this luck and hard work. Yeah, I think it's,um you know, because it was after logging in I went to car gurus for acouple of years. I went to drift for a couple of years now, about four monthsinto my journey here at our labs. That has has been wonderful so far, and allof those environments are very different from one another There thereare probably more differences than similarities. And so I think about likefrom a success standpoint, I think like the I think the key ingredient there isthe ability to work hard across different environments but stillproduce positive results. And to do that across a long domain of time,meaning? You know, I do think in some ways some of the really fast growthcompanies where people are getting promoted every six months or 12 months.It's created sort of a a bent perspective on what time domains are,and I think like to. To sustain a high level of effort and produce resultsover the period of of years is really...

...important. And so for me like that,that's where, but I also I'm careful about success because to me successlike being like if you were to classify yourself as successful, it's almostadmitting that you're at a destination, and I just I don't I don't think thatway. I think I'm very much still in the middle of this journey and, uh, andstill have a lot to learn. And I learn every day from everyone around me, sonot not sure I call it, uh, call it quite successful yet. And then, as forfor luck, I think it's, um, when I've been luckiest is when, uh, it's therelationships with people have built in the different companies I have workedat. And so when you think about getting a new job, finding a new place to work,hiring the great people around you like, I just hired a VP of marketing who Iworked with, uh, two jobs ago, who's amazing. She's wonderful, like that'sThat's what makes you lucky. That's what helps you build these greatcompanies, like those relationships and all the sliding doors moments. Thatprobably happened to have hard joined the company company to companies ago.And then you got Yeah, I often I love working with people I've worked with inthe past, and sometimes it's like that you work better together. People thinkyou work better together because of the positive things. I think I'm probablynot the easiest person to work with. And they know how to get around that,like, you know how to compensate for my faults, right? Like that's what I thinkis best about it. It's true. It's the situation I'm in now. Frank Y. Soft,our CEO. Here at our labs. He and I worked closely together car gurus. Andso when you can come together and you have, like, trust is established, soyou can you can both just get to work and know what the other is going to doand have very transparent, honest conversations with each other where youdon't hurt each other's feelings because you already know how you'regoing to operate. That's a thing of beauty, too. Have teammates like andyou know how to push somebody right?...

Like you know where to press were nottoo. It's, uh, a lot, a lot that goes into that. I love it Well, look, youknow you have tons of tons of years, including all all the time adrift. Youmust really know how to get people to respond to something when you want to.When they get to your website. But what would like a tactic be that you couldoffer to to the folks that they may be able to, like, use tomorrow in a deal?Yeah, I'd say, um, what I learned at drift more than anything was just howunderrepresented High conversion was on your website. And I think for mosttechnology companies, your website is your primary domain, especially nowthat we're in the midst of the pandemic. More people are focused on the digitaltransformation of their businesses they're focused on. I'm using theirwebsite to be able to convey their message and ultimately market and selltheir products. And so I think tactically, if you're on the sales sideand you're not using something like a drift to be able to process more ofthat traffic that's coming in and converted into leads, like, do youthink about all of the time and effort and money and resources that go intodriving eyeballs to your website? Yeah. And if 99% of them are leaving withoutever having told you who they are or what they do or why they werepotentially interested, it's just opportunity lost. And so yeah, I thinkthat that's certainly a tactic there. I would say, like for those for those inyour audience who are who are on the sales side of things, this is a littleless of a tactic and probably more of a career. Bit of strategic advice is toknow we we don't we don't want strategic. No, I'm just kidding. Giveonly strategic advice. But I do like because it's it's important that youknow the company, like drift in our labs, that car gurus that log me inlike the reason I chose those companies worse because they all they all offereda product that, frankly, I felt, was...

...the best in the market that had adifferentiated message. And it was it was the premier player in the market.If you're going to be in a sales role and you're gonna stake half of yourearnings on your ability to sell a product and market, I would go out ofmy way to make sure that you're at a company where you feel like you'reeither number one or you have a clear path to number one because you want tofeel like every day you're talking about your product. You have fullbelief in it because if you don't have full belief in it, that comes throughon the other end, the buyer. The buyer sees that if if you don't believe thatyour product is number one, so I just I think that above everything else iswhat makes somebody successful in sales is that they have full belief in whatthey're what they're putting out there because they believe they're solving aproblem. I like that. Yeah, I I definitely subscribe to this. I'vealways been involved in in restaurant related software and, like my goal hasalways been to help restaurants straight away. And so if the softwarethat I'm selling doesn't help, restaurants can't do it. By the way, Iwant to make sure you say this. Tell us what our labs does, because I don'tthink we set it up top. Yeah, so our labs and some of you may have thisproduct in your in your offices or if you have kids, they may have it intheir schools in their classrooms, but it's essentially an all in 1, 360degree camera speaker microphone. It's a product that our founders created outof a need because they saw that. You know, if you're talking 1 to 1, this isokay. A webcam is okay. But when you have a group setting and you havedifferent people that are talking to one another, we wanted to create a moreimmersive meeting experience. So we built this camera that responds to thepeople in the room. So if you have multiple speakers, it will show them onyour screen. So if you are a remote participant, you still feel immersed inthe meeting because you can see people's body language, you understandwho's doing what in the room. And we...

...just We wanted to get out of this worldof, uh, of like the bowling lane for video conference and offer a completeimmersive solution. So and we're continuing to build products thatsupport what we've built in the meeting. I'll pro so we can create a more fullroom solution for our customers. Well, now, more than ever, because even eventhough we're all, like separate right now and probably by the time I hope bythe time we're broadcasting this it's a little less true. But you and I werechatting before on sites. They're going to be the new off sites. You're gonnado them once a month and and you might have, you know, the on site in Torontoand the on site in New York match up and have multiple people in the roomneeding to have this conversation together. It just makes total sense.And the other thing I'd add there that's changed because of the pandemicis that a lot of companies have gone from being super hub focused in theirheadquarters. So now they're just hiring the best fit for the business,no matter where they are located. So chances are, even if you have a hub foryour office and you go in there and meet with part of your team, there'salways going to be at least one participant who is not based around theHub anymore and his remote that is part of your team. So I do think the way theworld will go back to work has changed completely. Well, it's funny. I justrealized buying this as a company. It's not for the group, it's for that person.It's to make the remote person feel more connected. Exactly. That's verycool. That's very cool. Well, look, I got a couple more questions speedaround. We'll get them in quick. Anything you're hiring for that weshould know about. Yeah. I mean, the big ones. This year, we have had somesome nice organic growth internationally outside of the US withour lab. So we're going to hire general managers for Europe and for for a pack.So those are big. Those are the big hires that I'm focused on in the firsthalf of the year. Cool here for sure. Maybe we'll find some people in theaudience good and then give some shout outs, both both people who you admireand follow and listen to their messages...

...and then others who are like up andcomers. I'm going to give a shout out to our internal team who has put outthis state of remote work, which is worth it for anyone who is listening.That's trying to figure out, like what the return to office is going to looklike. It's wonderful research and I think is very relevant to our time here.So take a look at that, I think, for great for great sales content, like ifyou're looking for people who put out good stuff. J. Webb from J. Davis Group.He's awesome. He's a really good interview of people. I think he does anice job on his podcast, and he's been very active in the sales world for along time. That's a must listen, Devin read, who posts a lot of stuff fromGone on LinkedIn, And it's all like quantified tactical and actionablepieces for for sales reps for sales leaders. Really good stuff there. He'sgot some good content. I highly recommend it. Yeah, awesome. And thenand then up and comers who should be keeping an eye out for Yeah, I'm gonnaI'm going to give a shout there to a couple people on my team. We have oursenior manager channel sales here, and Kylie Kenny. She's an up and comerwho's really helping to build a pretty special channel sales program at ourlabs. Kailyn McNamara is the other sales leader we have internally. She'ssenior manager of our direct sales team, so she has the account executives. Theaccount manager is the SDRs, and both of them have been so impressive asyoung leaders and the teams that they're building out and theirmanagement style. The other one is somebody who I worked with that bothlogmein and drift. His name is Dakota Green. He is a very special, not justsales leader, but overall leader of people who's gonna. He's gonna run verybig team someday. That's cool. That's cool. And I love that we got to. Two ofthree of the rising stars are female. I love that More women in sales, Please,Let's get Let's get this message out...

...there. Well, you know, more importantlythan all of these questions to me, is this one simple question. Give me somesecret on where I should be eating. Well, if you're coming to, uh, ifyou're coming up here specifically, if you came to my neighborhood, I think mywife and I would take you to Davos in Lindfield, which day videos as a numberof restaurants. Up here. The owner lives in our town, and he opened arestaurant a few years back when, when the local shopping area opened up. It'sjust, uh, it's always a good meal. It's always a great environment, and I loveit good. We're going to Davos when we get up to North Boston. Right? Nor thatbeautiful. Well, so great to have this time with you, Josh. And I reallyappreciate, like, hearing about your journey, excited to continue keeping upand and seeing you in all the success for or on your path to success, I willsay, for our labs. Thank you very much, Brandon. Appreciate it. Thanks, man.All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love theshow, please write a review in the apple podcast or Spotify app. Send itto some friends and make sure to hit that subscribe button. So you get theepisodes delivered to you each week. Reminder. This episode was brought toyou by quarter past quarter Path is the first radically transparent and andcompensation solution from sales reps to finance. Get started for free atquarter past dot com slash revenue. Dash collective Had a lot of fun today.I hope you did too. Now go smash those numbers. Say something. Yeah,.

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