The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 85: Starting a Company With Your Spouse w/ Kathleen Booth

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 85: Starting a Company With Your Spouse w/ Kathleen Booth

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone. Welcome back to the Revenue Collection podcast. I am your host, Brandon martin you're listening to. Is this a good time the show where we talk to revenue collected members ask them some questions they answer. It's fun. We really shows Tuesdays and Thursdays come listen. Each week had subscribed to the thing and make us happy. Our guest today is Kathleen Booth. She's a VP of marketing at Clean dot IO and we get talking about starting a business with your spouse and becoming an instant mom. This episode was brought to you by quota path. The commission tracking software built for sales, operations, finance and accounting teams. If running commissions of payroll has you running for the hills, quota path is for you quarterback helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay their teams accurately and on time every time, keep your team motivated and on target. Simplify your commissions at quarter past dot com slash revenue dash collective and give your reps the gift of transparency. All right, let's see...

...this. Episode 33 Larry bird. Is this a good time? Alright, I am so excited to have Kathleen booth with us. Kathleen is the vice president of marketing for Clean dot Io. And Kathleen and I have been able to know each other for a couple of years now. Super psyched to have you on. I am so excited to be here. Thanks for having me. Well as we do all meat, no filler. Let's jump right in to tell us a little bit about your current role and then you know what are the important demarcations in your career to get here? Sure. So I am currently vice president of marketing at clean dot IO. We are a series a start up out of Baltimore Maryland. In the digital engagement security space. I have a very bizarre and circuitous career path. Wait, wait, hold on. Because for those, not me because I know what it meant, but digital securities, those words, I knew what they meant, but just for anyone who doesn't. Yeah, so we we call it digital engagement security. And basically the idea is that, you know,...

...traditional business, you interact face to face and and business is all about selling trust and establishing trust and when you move your business into an online world, how you do that changes. And so we're all about protecting brands user experience and revenue by helping them control the third party code that executes on their websites. Huh, interesting. Okay, cool. Sorry, and now tell us how you got here. Okay, so it is a very nontraditional career path. I spent the 1st 15 years of my career working in international development, specifically in water utility privatization. I happened to I did an MBA in marketing prior to all that. And partly through that career, I like shifted my focus basically because I recognize that a lot of these big projects I was working on, we're derailing because of poor communication and so that brought me back into my roots and marketing. And then when I decided to settle down and have a family and I realized I could not keep traveling all over the world with a baby, my husband and I started a...

...marketing agency which we owned for 11 years, sold it in 2017. And since then I have been in house at a series of different startups, generally coming in as the first head of marketing. Amazing. That's that's very cool and shouts you for thinking that you know, having a family and then ditching everything else and starting a business. And I don't know if I should get kudos or if I should be committed. We really wanted to. I I understand you take control a little bit more of your life this way and just the ability to do that and have a family at the same time. It's pretty awesome. I think you should get major kudos, not not be committed maybe after doing it all your kids older now at this point or Yeah, so I I got married to somebody who had three Children from a previous marriage. So I was an instant mom of three and I always tell this story. I went from being Like single and fancy free overnight to having three kids and driving a minivan in like less than...

...three months and then we had one of our own. And so my three step Children are all grown and living out on their own now and my youngest is now almost 15 years old. So wow, close close to an empty nest. Sounds like a lot of babysitters to me. uh two young kids at home. Crazy! It was crazy. Back in the day when we had four originally, four kids, two dogs, It was nuts. And a business. There you go. Yeah, I just, I love how your career has taken such an interesting path. And I always think that it's both success and hard work that gets us there. Give me an example of either or both that actually might have impacted your, you know, your path. Yeah, well hard work. I mean founding and owning any kind of a business, being an entrepreneur is I think some of the hardest work anybody can do. I mean I, my business partner was my husband and I still say to this day that the greatest accomplishment of my life is that I'm still married after owning a business with my spouse for 11...

...years. it was really tough, you know I mean we are business evolved over the time we owned it, we started as one thing we we evolved into another, I kind of happened into business ownership you know, if that's even possible and along the way, even though I had done an M. B. A. I still feel like that sort of book learning does not prepare you to run a business. And so I'm very self taught and a voracious learner but you know I spent 11 years with this business doing everything from the strategy, the biz dev the marketing to like literally washing the dishes in the sink of the office kitchen and doing it while raising kids and so I loved it but it was very very hard work. Yeah that that sounds awful. No it wasn't though, like you only do that kind of hard work if you're doing something you love and if it if it's you know feeding you in some way and it definitely did. I I love being an entrepreneur, it was exciting, it was interesting, I could see the product of my work. I also, you know, I'm in a different point in my life now where I...

...work in house and I love that too, you know, and you had said like luck is a part of it. So my luck story is that I started a podcast shortly before I sold my company and the reason I sold my company is because I started my podcast which and that's because I wanted to have, you know, call it eight episodes recorded before I launched. And one of the interviews I did was with a friendly competitor and before we started recording I was telling him that I thought I might be ready for a change and I was considering an exit and he sort of said very casually, we'll call me before you do anything. And I could just tell the way he said it, he meant it and I did call him and I think it was like less than two months later we had completed his acquisition of my company. It went very quickly and all because of having done a podcast and happened to have invited my competitor on as a guest. I like that. We'll look for those of you listening. Not if anyone's coming correct with the hundreds of millions for bite. You know, maybe that will...

...also be my story as well. Um, that's, that's very cool. I would also say there's got to be a little stroke of luck of finding the person you want to spend your life with, who also wants to be in business with you, whatever the moment of you two coming together was also had to have some kind of magic in it. Yeah, for sure. I mean it's it's hard enough to make a marriage work, you know? Let's all be honest. It that is working and of itself. Um, and it's very, very hard to find anybody to be a business partner with. I always have said any kind of a business partner is like having a spouse may be without some of the benefits, but you know, it was real work, but also like a real commitment to making at work because we did care so much about each other. So yeah. Yeah, that's great. That's great. Well look, you know, you have a ton of these, I'm sure would love to know, give us your best kind of tactic that people can actually implement tomorrow. What are they doing wrong on inbound?...

Give us like, give me something, give me something really heavy. Go deep into the, into the tricks. Oh boy. Well, I can give you a couple. Um, you know, and they're not that hard. Honestly, I think the first one is I am a huge fan of funny enough podcast guesting everywhere I go. I pretty much higher a booking agent to book the subject matter experts from the company that I'm at on podcast. It's incredibly inexpensive and it's, you can get, usually you can get booked on four podcasts a month for under $1000. Like the R. O. I of that is insane. And you know how, how that especially at a startup where you might not have a big budget. You know, I'm a serial startup marketer, nobody throws a lot of budget at me when I joined. So I have to be scrappy, I have to be creative and that's one of my like tried and true proven tactics. Um, and it works for legion. It works for brand awareness.

It also works if you're looking to raise money because you can get on podcasts, you know about kind of like Ceo and founder journeys that investors might listen to. So it serves a lot of purposes and is definitely my, my little ace up my sleeve. I love that one. Any any other things. I mean that's a gem. You want to share anything else? Sure. I mean, I am also a big fan of email newsletters. It sounds kind of silly, but I think people have have sort of underestimated the power they hold. And we're seeing this renaissance right now of amazing, especially personal email newsletters. But I feel like companies kind of check the box and so I generally come in and I revamp a newsletter or if there isn't when I started and I haven't come from a person and I have that person inject their personality into it and make it fun and really relatable and not, you know, from info at or newsletter at another simple one that can make a giant difference. Yeah. Not very expensive to do. It just takes time and a little bit of effort. I love yeah. Let me just tell you none of my tips are expensive because I never have a...

...big budget. This is the life of being in a startup startup. Marketing. Your it seems like you're always taking the easy way out, Kathleen. Exactly. One of these days. I'll go I'll go into a big company with a big budget at the end of the rainbow. There's a serious c company waiting for you. Well, I mean it's funny, I laugh about it. But I don't know if I could do that because having owned and run my own business, I feel like coming in as the head of marketing in a startup is the closest I'll get in a marketing role to still being an entrepreneur because it's like you're building a business within a business, you come in, you grow your team, you develop the policies, the procedures, the strategies, the operation, Playbooks, you build the text act like you are building your little marketing business inside of the company. Yeah, it's very cool. I love I love how much you appreciate that. And you know, I'm sure folks, some folks listening or like just go work for a B and you go from B to B to I. P. O. And you crush it. You make all this money. But guess what? It's not just always about that. So I'm on your squad. I...

...love this game. Go from zero to something big game. Well a couple of things, a couple of quick ones here. Any key positions you're hiring for? Yeah, well I just filled a position on my team of content manager, but within the broader company we are hiring for a sales account executive and an SDR. So you can find, and I think we're actually hiring for some engineering positions two and you can find all those on our website at clean dot io Okay, perfect, awesome. And uh give some shout outs who are some folks that you appreciate kind of what content they're putting out. You inspires, you both both up and comers and folks that are kind of established. Yeah, so in terms of very established people, I am a huge fan girl of rand Fishkin. Um just consistently puts out unbelievably well researched content and he's not afraid to have an opinion and he's usually right in my opinion. Um so I follow him really closely and I've learned some of my best s e. O tricks...

...from him. I'm also a big fan of Jason Lumpkin. It's faster. I just think everything he writes about growing a SAS businesses fascinating and helps, you know, challenge my beliefs and then in terms of up and comers, I would say, I don't know if you classifiers and up and cover, but I I recently interviewed Lindsay chuck Emma for my podcast. She's the founder of casted, which is a new podcasting platform and she just, she's got a great linked in presence. She's a really strong female entrepreneur that I think is going to do amazing things. So I would watch her and then somebody who once worked for for me, a woman named Liz Morehead who is probably one of the, I would say foremost thinkers when it comes to content strategy, she is still at the company that I used to be at called Impact and she writes their newsletter and it has grown it to a subscription. Our subscriber base of over 50,000 people. She's she's pretty amazing Wow 50,000 people on a company's...

...newsletters for for like yeah marketing company. She has her own website to her website is I believe Liz morehead dot com and she keynotes a lot of conferences. So she's she's fantastic, incredible. That's that's an incredible amount of presidents. All right, well look, these are all important questions. Those those questions are for everybody else. And now the question for me where should I eat? Give me one plate. Give me some secret. I have such a good place for you. So down in I'm sort of in the D. C. Region and um there are a lot of good restaurants down here but by far the best restaurant that is one of those like lifetime experiences is in a tiny tiny town. I believe it's southwest of D. C. And it's called the inn at little Washington. And heard of this place. This is this is what brought Michelin to the east coast of the United States. You have to go and like spend the night out there and just...

...give yourself over to the experience. It's it's multiple tasting courses, fascinating food. The whole surroundings are beautiful. You will never forget your meal there, love it. I can't wait. So when this becomes a big podcast, the sponsors will buy me dinner at the end of little Washington, can't get it in the tasting or sorry. In the kitchen. The chef has a table in the kitchen where you can watch him cook and it's amazing. I do love a table in the kitchen, that's amazing. Alright, Kathleen, So great to have you. Thank you so much for being here, excited to continue to learn more from you as I have over the years and and so pumped to have you on Well, thanks so much for having me. This is a ton of fun, awesome. Alright, that is our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, send it to everybody, you know, literally everybody hit, just reply all on every email, sent the showdown or just hit subscribe. Either way reminder. This episode is brought to you by quarter past quarter Path is the first radically transparent and, and compensation solution from sales reps, defiant. Get started for free at...

...quarter past dot com slash revenue dash club. I had a lot of fun today. I hope you did too. Now go pressure numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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