The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 43: Selling in APAC is different w/ Chirayu Wadke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 43: Selling in APAC is Different w/ Chirayu Wadke

Hello, everyone. And welcome back to the revenue collected podcast. I am your host, Brandon Barton, and you're listening to Is this a good time? The show where I asked revenue Collective members some really basic questions, and they have awesome answers. In a short 15 minutes or so, Conversation way will be coming to you Tuesdays and Thursdays each week. So please smash subscribe button. If you don't wanna miss an opportunity to learn from some of the members of the RC community, any of whom could be your future boss, especially our guest today, try you would Kay, the head of business development for Google Cloud in a pack, will get a chance. Thio hear from him on how selling and a pack is completely different than in the U. S. But before we get going on that, I wanted to tell you a little bit about this month Sponsor, who was six cents six cents. The number one account engagement platform helps you identify accounts that air in market for your solution. Prioritize your efforts, engage buyers the right way with highly relevant...

...messaging and measure what actually matters with six cents platform, you're able to get into more deals, improve win rates, increase overall pipeline and optimize budget. Spend to learn more, visit six cents dot com slash revenue Collective. Alright, let's do this Episode five of Is this a good time? Great. Here we are with Sarah, You wad K. Thank you so much for being here. We are excited to chat with you today, and certainly as we dio on this podcast, we'd like to jump right in all meat. No filler. So let's get into the questions. So, first off, of course, Tell us what your current role is and how you got here. Give me, like, your baseball card a little bit of your history. And how you got Thio Singapore, where you are, uh, interesting. Yeah, a whole lot to unpack. Right? So I grew up in India and, you know, that's essentially an emerging market in many ways, and I moved to the U. S. During...

...the financial crisis. And, you know, I worked the rising violence, was doing mobile payments, and then try and Google to also sort of support their business development activity in our mobile payments. And my job was to take, you know, what was an early stage product and help it succeed by putting in place relationships on licensing agreements with the ecosystem of players that you know exist in the payment side. And then I moved to sort of an allied area off device hardware where I pretty much the same thing with a different ecosystem off partners and customers. And, you know, sometimes during that time I realized that there's something going on in Asia and it was couldn't put my finger on it. China was throwing up. It's own massive unicorns, and I felt like, you know, Android was taking off on YouTube, was taking off, and I felt maybe there's an opportunity to come back and get, you know, things here on day. I made the move back, So from a timing perspective, you started in mobile payments in 2000 and nine, right? This is early and then...

...out in San Francisco at Google, and that's right and and they saw Okay, so you saw this opportunity and said, Let me move back to Asia. I saw that opportunity and I saw that, you know, In China, for example, mobile payments were almost five times the size off transactions that were happening in the States, right? And when this is by Theodore sort of government helped innovation, you had about 40 50 60% of transactions in the China happening on on the device, while the US was stuck at 10 and 15%. So I thought, you know, maybe there's something that Asia is getting right. Maybe it's the lack of legacy that's leading to consumers being more open to experiences. And that led me to move back, right? I said, Look, looking at YouTube. Looking at Android the adoption was insane and the largest consumer base, waas in a pack. So I said, You know what it's worth looking at a non opportunity toe, you know, run a VC fund that investing startups here and that's what I did. I...

...moved back, was funded by some of the well known brands in the US Accel, Cisco, the World Bank on You had a you know, a few participants from Asia, but I had the opportunity to sort of redefine seed stage investing in in a pack, and that's what I did. That and the fund for what, 2.5 years, and it was a unique opportunity to see what works or doesn't on the ground. And, you know, sort of also the Orient myself toe some of the concepts that I picked up all the 89 years in Silicon Valley and figure out if those really working it back, you know, and no surprises. Many of them don't. I kind of did that, and I realized that I'm spending a lot of time with with, like founders, helping them with their companies, you know, standing up their their businesses, their products. So I said, You know what? I really love getting my hands dirty, and that's really who I am on decided that, Hey, Google had an exciting role tryingto cell. It's not sell, but I would say...

...evangelized its cloud products and in a pack in select geography select customers. And it felt like just that. I tricked because, you know, in my previous gigot Google, I had launch new products that were new to market, and this was an opportunity to take existing products that probably were, ah, little more formed in the States and get them to a back. So it's been a very different journey from sort of regular, you know, commercial executives. But, you know, it's been a very interesting and learning, you know, I would say fulfilling journey from a learning standpoint. Learned a lot along the way, seeing what start ups are all about. Seeing what you know, it takes to build one. Don't. Not directly. I've been on the border for a few in in a pack. And, you know, I've seen, you know, some some interesting success is a zealous failure. So just yeah, no, look, I mean, such a I mean, I I could dive in forever. I mean, you know, we try to keep it, uh, to to these kind of short sound bites. But, man, I I want to get you back on here. Maybe we'll do...

...a long form Thio. I mean, you know, you were you were working with the Prime Minister s Office in Singapore is a technical adviser, which this the Singaporean government is certainly unique. And man, it must have been very, very cool experience there, but But we do Here, let me, uh, let me kind of keep moving on questions. So look, I always think about success is being made up of both hard work and lock. Give me an example of where luck came in. I mean, hard work part is pretty obvious, But give me an example where luck came in for you. I think, you know, investing a zoo. Muchas people would call it a sort of skill. I think it's a lot of luck, right? And people don't like to admit, especially on the V c side. That Ah, whole bunch of it is luck. And what I realized is I kind of was making my way toe through the investing world is, you know, if I want to play skill versus luck based games, the operator world was a far better place for me If I wanted to play sort off games that are slightly more tempted towards Scott skill because the...

...investing world, regardless of what we see, is might say. And, you know, they kind of like to sort of be on Twitter and talk about you know how how good they were a decision making. The reality is nobody knew when they were fasting, whether this thing would take off, right. And you you kind of had done your homework on on on the founder so that we might like simple take right. If you're an operator, the likelihood is that skills going to play a greater part in your success. But if you're an investor, it's it's completely skill based and sorry, luck based. And you just got to admit that you know, some of those successes due to lock it in. I'm not sure that happens a lot, but, you know, that's really my sort of frame of mind. If I mean, having seen both sides of the puzzle and did you did you get lucky and you're investing? Was was there any company that took off and yeah, I mean, I think I got more unlucky than lucky. But that's usually how Because, you know, I had the opportunity to wind up a company or two and, you know, have the founder sell the chairs. But, you know, back there are a couple of companies in my...

...portfolio or X portfolio that are doing really well and, you know, have taken off and raised substantive amount of capital upwards of 50 $70 million and are doing really well. So, you know, I think the reality is that you were lucky in some situations where you don't expect toe. You know, some of the companies that were write offs in the previous sort of, you know half of the year have suddenly sort of become very different companies. And and it's hard to predict, especially at at early stage. Yeah, for sure. And so, so moving on. You know, I always ask all of our guests to give us one tactic that people the revenue collective can use tomorrow. Is there something that you have in your skills or your your secrets? Give us a secret that that people can use either Do better business development close more deals like What's What's part of your secret sauce? I think you know what I would like to sort of focus on is what I've learned in a pack and in emerging...

...markets that's different from, you know, Ah, lot of the U. S. And European markets, right? Essentially, your G people capital compared toa, you know, by an order of magnitude, maybe 50 next door and labor's very easy to sort of obtain. And whatever happens in the US or you are really doesn't scale here in many ways, right? And therefore my big lesson is If you're here selling a product, the way you are selling in the U. S. Just doesn't work. The business model is different. If you sort of align yourself to selling productivity tools here, I think you're it's gonna be an upward challenge. Not that it's not possible. It's just that I've seen things Software cell for three reasons here. One. It's either that you know, you're solving a complete functional issue. So you know someone wants to just outsource a complete function, and they're able to do that. Second, you're solving a regulatory challenge for them. So either stacks or, you know, there's a regulatory sort of mandate toe good...

...digitized right, and you're helping them do that. And lastly, you bring them new revenue. And, you know, I would actually think that the last one is the most important. Which is, if you're helping them, the customer bring, you know, new revenue into the company. They're going to give you a percentage of the revenue. But to ask a customer to pay your flat fee. A SAS pastry for a software is, uh, usually seen with skepticism on. Therefore, when I see all these models from the US coming here. I'm, like, shake my head and say, you know, let them be in the on the count for two months and we'll talk after that, right? So, uh, not really my secret sauce to close more deals. I think about the business model. I think it's different here. I like that, especially for all our listeners out in a pack. This is great advice. Alright. So winding, winding down a couple couple quick hits here, give us a position that you're hiring for that. If there was somebody out there looking to work for you What? What's a key position?...

I mean, I'm looking. I'm not hiring right now, but if I were, it would be, uh, someone who's, you know, in sort off enterprise sales organization in a pack. And that would be a great place to start. And someone who's done some amount of sass in the past would be amazing, because that's still I don't have and, you know, that could be sort off complimentary toe, whatever I bring to the table. It's so interesting that, you know, uh, Thio here, even how the depth of your career and saying Hey, I don't have that ton of experience and sas, right? Like, you know, it seems like we all all are going through everything software as a service software as a service. But as you said in a pack, maybe that's not. Maybe that's not the prevailing business model. So all right, so So you know, any give some shout outs, Who are some people that you follow either Twitter or linked in and like, their content and and and think that they kind of speaking the truth about sales or business development or attack or anything. I forget his last name, first name. But, you know, I think I hope I get it right.

It's just Lemkin, uh, Jason. I mean, I follow him. I was an operator, and I just love his his takes on things because I think, uh, there's a certain amount of grounded logic and everything that he says, and I love that. The other person I'm really sort of really, really reading about is there's a guy called Gavin Baker again. I hope I'm getting his dream right. Gavin is an investor I think is the chief investment officer of Fidelity or one of the arms of fidelity and his insights into technology investing or just incredible. These are not. We see, we see based, uh, investors. These are, you know, investors that investing in public companies. And, um, you know, some of the data and some of the insights are just incredible. So I'm really into sort of following at the highest level, you know, in to sort of faculties that have spent time in both operating in technology companies as...

...well as investing. I'm spending them following these two, these two folks. Awesome. That's incredible. Great. Well, I'm gonna I'm gonna make sure toe get him on my list, cause he's not currently so last one. And I love that. You know, you're out in Singapore. So much great food. Tell me one place that we should go visit doesn't need to be in Singapore. Could be anywhere in the world. But one place we should go visit and get a great meal at once. The World open opens back up. Yeah. So you know, when I was in the Bay Area, I usedto there's this really amazing Persian restaurant called Chelo Kebab E. And there's a nice story off off a guy who immigrated to the States when the Iranian revolution was happening in the seventies and he started a restaurant. And, you know, it's been probably the most amazing food I've eaten pushing food that we didn't globally right then, you know, it's validated by, you know, by my wife because she she grew up in it on for a few years. And she said, Look, I mean, you're not going to get something like this. Uh, this is...

...authentic as authentic. And it's in Sunnyvale, California. So, you know, if I get an opportunity, if anyone gets an opportunity, you should go back there for For me, it's It's amazing. I love that. We'll check it. Door dash can get it all the way to you in Singapore anyway. Awesome to chat. Thank you so much for being here with us. I know that people are going to get a lot out of your experience and really appreciative of that and really looking forward to kind of following you as you continue along in your career. Thank you. All right. That's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in the apple podcasts or Spotify app. Send it to some friends and make sure to hit that subscribe button. A reminder. This episode was brought to you by six cents. Powered by AI and Predictive Analytics. Six cents helped you to unite your entire revenue team with a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue growth. Had fun today. Hope you did too. Now get out there and crush your numbers,...

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