The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 83: Seed Stage Marketing w/ Peter Schroeder

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 83: Seed Stage Marketing w/ Peter Schroeder

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" Series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone. Welcome back to the revenue collected podcasts. I'm your host, Brandon martin, you're listening to Is this a good time The show where I ask revenue collective members some really basic questions and they have great answers. In a short 15 minute conversation, we really shows Tuesdays and thursday. So please hit subscribe. So you don't miss any of these amazing people. Our guest today is Peter Schroeder. He's the head of marketing at Ona. We talk about how Peter never really had a marketing boss yet became a head of marketing. How did that happen? This episode was brought to you by quota path, Commission tracking, software built for sales operations, finance and accounting teams. If running commissions has you running for the hills, quota path is for you, quote a path helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay their teams accurately. And on time every time. Keep your team motivated and on target. Simplify your commissions at quarter past dot com slash revenue dash collected and give your reps the gift of transparency. All right, let's do this Episode 3 to 32. Is this a good time? Alright, this is great. We are here with Peter Schrader. He is the head of growth and marketing at Ona. Peter. You're coming to us from Houston, is that right? So great to have you man? Yeah, that's right. I'm typically in new york, but given Covid and the times that we're in, I'm down in Houston for the winter. I love that. I hope, I hope when people hear this, which is likely to be in May that there is no what are they gonna be like? What's Covid? No, no one's going to think, but they're gonna they're gonna wonder why everyone hasn't moved to new york city back to new york city yet, so I can't wait for that moment. Meanwhile, all meat, no filler. Let's get right to it, peter. Tell us a little bit about your path and how you got to where you are and your current role and what you do. Yeah, definitely. So currently, as you mentioned head of marketing and Growth here at Ona where knowledge integration platform that aims to take all the information that a company creates and generates all of its disparate data sources from a data and unstructured...

...data perspective. And we aim to centralize all of that data that a company has for regulatory purposes really to give them control access and help them keep that information secure. So we bolster uh, a lot of logos from the Fortune 500 a lot of fast growing tech companies, a lot of the bigger companies that you've heard of. And because what we do sensitive, we don't talk about those companies a lot. But yeah, how how I got here is straight out of college, I actually started a company on my own and the idea behind it was we have all of these different messaging platforms that we're communicating on whether it's slack, whether it's email, whether it's even your social media direct messages, it's just communication overload, notification overload and it just got to be too much. But at the same time, facebook was going through Cambridge Analytica and all these data issues and basically all the social media and messaging platforms closed off their aPI s overnight, kind of shutting down the business that was still in closed beta. I didn't have too much blood sweat and tears into it, but fast forward years later and someone comes to me and pitches the idea of ona, which is hey, we want to take all these disparate data sources from a corporation's perspective, bring them into one central location to give everyone access to their data. And I was kind of like, that's like a couple levels above the idea, I had a long time ago, a much better idea that can have a much bigger impact on the world. And so that's how I came to join and I joined about a year and a half ago, uh, inherited a marketing team with two people and we've since grown To over 160 people as a company. My marketing team is almost to 10 people and I also head up the business development team, which is seven people strong, wow, that's incredible. So you, so when, when they met you, they were like, all right, this person is, is like, clearly has thought about this a lot. That's, that seems like a really, you know, hand meets glove fit. Well, they were, they were kind of looking for someone...

...who could see the bigger picture because right now we have a couple of different use cases that we operate and we kind of serve customers in right now it's it's more discovery, information, archiving, information governance, but what they were looking for which was someone who could see and conceptualize the platform vision of Ona which is you know, not just the single out of the box use cases, but a company really centralizing all of their data in one platform for all of these different use cases, but then also more opportunistic use cases like enterprise search knowledge management, other things that companies can use their data as a competitive advantage. And so they are kind of looking for someone who could understand What they were doing now but also the 5-10 year vision. Nice, nice. And and let me ask like, are are you also is ona or you trying to take let's say things that are not data sources today, like phone calls and transcribing them so that they become data sources, right? Like increasingly, especially in this world of zoom that we've been living in video calls and phone calls. Like all of this stuff is actually part of that fabric, isn't it? Yeah, It's funny you say that because with our technology we use OcR technology to ingest images and be able to process that data and classify it, we we can adjust video, audio files and make all of these different formats that you communicate and especially in a remote world accessible. And it's actually funny because we launched our integration with zoom this year and we've had a really tight connection with them and strong customer demand because it's all this data that didn't exist before. If you think about, you know, you and us, we might have been doing this meeting in person in a studio and stuff won't have been recorded over zoom. But now, opportunistically, we can go back and we can look at a lot of stuff that happened over zoom conversations and we can make sure that that information doesn't get lost again from a regulatory purpose. But then also more forward looking at Jordan from uh if we...

...want to go back and find what we're talking about. So we don't have to have another hour long meeting about something that we already sold for a year or two ago. We can come back and do that if we're able to ingest the information, classify it properly and then present it in a way that's contextual to what we're talking about. And so there's a lot of cool things that we're going to be doing with data in the future. And I think you and I talked about this before, the more data we have, the better that it gets, the more that our machine learning modules start to learn, the better it can present it, and the stronger that our technology gets. Just the more data that you piped through it. Yeah, very cool. It's it's interesting to think I'm in the world of digitizing ordering for restaurants and the amount of knowledge and insights that can be pulled from the fact that you're now doing a digital order instead of telling somebody your order is tremendous. And I never really thought about that in the workplace. So I like being able to kind of search a meeting. I think I would want that. But then I'd have to think about it because I curse a lot and probably that's not good. So whatever. But we're allowed to curse in his podcast if we fucking want. So that's fine. All right, well look. Uh so, you know, I think that hard luck and work both contribute to getting people to where they are. Give us a story of either, you know, in terms of your career where hard work or luck played a role. Yeah. I think it's um interesting in my case that I've I've never actually reported to someone in marketing right from the first company that I started to the company after that was a seed stage startup where I jumped in and started running digital marketing without even knowing that I was doing it to the company after that. Starting a marketing department from scratch. It's just I've never actually reported and learn from someone, which I think there's pros and cons to. I think one of the cons is you don't get out of the box answers that you can kind of just take and run with and it's...

...kind of an easy way that's prescribed to that you're able to just take that and run with. I think the pro is that you're not ingesting old habits, outdated methodologies that you're kind of creating things from scratch and it also takes you going out and finding mentors on your own that can kind of teach you things and so there's things there's people like Ryan Benicio who I know that a lot of people in the R. C. No, he was the former ceo of G to crowd and now he's the CMO of whereby and just like having people like him as a resource where you can, you can pin questions off them, ask them different things. And I think that's where the revenue collective can be really helpful for people like me and anyone who likes to learn on their own, learn by doing things kind of take an innovative approach And craft things on their own. And so I think that's one of the areas that like I said, I didn't necessarily have to pay my own way. I could have taken like a big corporate route, gone, do a Fortune 500 company and learned the way that it's done. But you know, that's just not me. That's not my style and, and that's not throughout that. I wanted to take. Well, look, I mean, how did you meet, how did you meet Ryan? I mean that, that's, did you, did you just reach out cold and say, hey, I'd love to pick your brain on something or Yeah, I think that a lot of people, if you pay attention to them, you do some sort of personalization and your genuine, it's not that hard to get through the big name. People like Ryan for example, he's, you know, one of Forbes most influential cmos and it was just a couple of years ago I reached out to him, he was based in Chicago and I was going through Chicago and I sent him a nice personalized note. Mentioned some of the things that I love that he did at G two and just asked if you wanted to get coffee and he said, yeah, of course. Like talk to my assistant set it up and there's several cases like that if if you're just 1 to 1 with people, you don't have an agenda other than you want to learn from them other than you want to get better from them another than you want to ask them really good and well thought through...

...questions and not waste their time. I think that people are always more than willing to help out and I think that's really a key thing is just like not having agenda. Like if I could sit in a room with So many people for 30 minutes and just ask them questions. Like most of the time I'm just trying to learn from them. I don't have an ulterior agenda. And I think that that goes a long way in a lot of cases. I love that. I love it. It's very cool. Sounds like a nice stroke of luck that he said, yes, come meet with me during your visit to Chicago. So look, give us a little bit of a tactic that people can use as they're doing. They're kind of daily work anything out of your bag of tricks. Yeah, I think that over this last year, if we've learned anything, it's it's how to adapt, right? We've learned how to adapt and are at home lives, we've learned how to adapt in our business lives and we're really just becoming more resilient people because of it. But one of the use cases I like to learn I like to use is because Ona is such an enterprise sale, at least at this stage. Field marketing was a huge channel for us. We were we were doing tons of field marketing events, going to different cities events, putting on smaller, closed group events outside of those that were really fun and engaging. And that was really hard at first when Covid happened, right, because We kind of thought, how are we going to emulate the environment of bringing 20 people to New York City, renting out Radio City music hall, having the Rockets show up on the surprises. We're going through the tour and then have a closed group, 20 person dinner catered and buy a nice new york city restaurant. Like how do you take that experience would do that's a very enterprise like sales and marketing, motion, and how do you trans that translate that virtually? And we've had to think a lot about that as a marketing team, like, because it seems almost impossible to do, right? But it's something that we're wrestling...

...with, and it's something that we're adapting more and more over time. How can we get what's up, what has been successful? So for us, we've of course done a lot more webinars, but we started trying to go over the top with these virtual events, like how do we bring 20 people into a closed door group and surprise them with a celebrity? Like add that element of surprise, surprise them with a magician, surprise them with something to try to replicate that. And actually what we found is I think that this will be surprising to you. Like the wow factor at least in our opinion, hasn't been that as impactful virtually. And it also hasn't been that important. What what we've gotten from feedback from top level executives is they want a closed door group, you know, where they can be assured that they're not being recorded side sort of India where they can meet with 20 other people that are in their space that they haven't been able to meet within the last, you know, year plus and they just want to talk to them about the problems that they're facing and that hour and a half that they're able to spend with 20 other executives that are like them that they haven't been able to meet with and bounce ideas off the off with. They're not looking for a wine tasting event, a beer tasting event that's an hour long when they have kids screaming in the background and they've been on zoom calls all day. Like That's not the experience that like people want these days at least in a work from home environment and think about the meetings that like you attend like in the happy hours you event attend, you want like you enjoy like the fluffy events where like, you know, you're maybe doing like some lightweight trivia or something or do you enjoy like those 90 minute, like most productive meetings? That's your most productive meeting of the week and then maybe you don't have like anything to do the rest of the day. Like for me as a work from home person, that's ideal for me, is like those really productive meetings where we knock out everything at a high level and then we just get back to business and we're better off because of it. And that's at least the route we've been taking. Like really successful today. Very cool, very cool.

All right, well now we're in the lightning round, we're gonna, we're gonna go quick through these, what's a key position you're hiring for? Key position I'm hiring for is marketing apps. It's not officially approved yet, but I can't stress how important marketing apps is. If I was just starting a marketing department today, it would be my first hire. Nice. And then you already gave a shout out to Ryan, anybody else to give some shout outs to uh my whole entire team that I think does an amazing job. I'd give a shout out to Kyle Lacy at lesson lea I think he probably gets shouted out a lot on this, but I think he does a great job, He's active in the community and he's always just, I've bounced a million ideas off him too. He's just, you know, he's just one of those folks that everyone seems to like, I love you, Kyle, you're a good dude, very cool. I'm not going to tag him when I post for this link because people going to think I'm too close to him or something and get uh probably yeah, exactly, exactly. Alright, well look, all this stuff is pretty good and that's fine. I don't really care about most of it, I want to know where to eat, that's all I care about. Where should give me a place in Houston, man. You're down there now. Yeah, there's um there's a place in Houston called potent and if I'm vegan and if you think of texas, texas and vegan it doesn't go hand in hand. But I called there chef, they have a private tasting menu. I asked him if he could do a special vegan one for me and some friends and he totally accommodated us. It blew me away was one of the best meals I've ever had and so shout out to Putin Putin. I love it. All right man, peter. So great to have you. Thank you for the conversation. Some real good nuggets in there and looking forward to getting back up to new york and grabbing a drink. Yeah, thanks for having me. Can't wait. All...

...right, that is the show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love this show, please rate and review in the Apple podcast or Spotify, absented to some friends, make sure to smash subscribe button, get the word out. We're working hard reminder. This episode was brought to you by quarterback quota. Path is the first radically transparent and to end compensation solution from sales reps to finance, get started for free at quarterback dot com slash revenue dash collect. I had a lot of fun. Hope you did too. Now go crush those numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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