The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Ep 83: Seed Stage Marketing w/ Peter Schroeder

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 83: Seed Stage Marketing w/ Peter Schroeder

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" Series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone. Welcome back to therevenue collected podcasts. I'm your host, Brandon martin, you're listeningto Is this a good time The show where I ask revenue collective members somereally basic questions and they have great answers. In a short 15 minuteconversation, we really shows Tuesdays and thursday. So please hit subscribe.So you don't miss any of these amazing people. Our guest today is PeterSchroeder. He's the head of marketing at Ona. We talk about how Peter neverreally had a marketing boss yet became a head of marketing. How did thathappen? This episode was brought to you by quota path, Commission tracking,software built for sales operations, finance and accounting teams. Ifrunning commissions has you running for the hills, quota path is for you, quotea path helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay their teamsaccurately. And on time every time. Keep your team motivated and on target.Simplify your commissions at quarter past dot com slash revenue dashcollected and give your reps the gift of transparency. All right, let's dothis Episode 3 to 32. Is this a good time? Alright, this is great. We arehere with Peter Schrader. He is the head of growth and marketing at Ona.Peter. You're coming to us from Houston, is that right? So great to have you man?Yeah, that's right. I'm typically in new york, but given Covid and the timesthat we're in, I'm down in Houston for the winter. I love that. I hope, I hopewhen people hear this, which is likely to be in May that there is no what arethey gonna be like? What's Covid? No, no one's going to think, but they'regonna they're gonna wonder why everyone hasn't moved to new york city back tonew york city yet, so I can't wait for that moment. Meanwhile, all meat, nofiller. Let's get right to it, peter. Tell us a little bit about your pathand how you got to where you are and your current role and what you do. Yeah,definitely. So currently, as you mentioned head of marketing and Growthhere at Ona where knowledge integration platform that aims to take all theinformation that a company creates and generates all of its disparate datasources from a data and unstructured...

...data perspective. And we aim tocentralize all of that data that a company has for regulatory purposesreally to give them control access and help them keep that information secure.So we bolster uh, a lot of logos from the Fortune 500 a lot of fast growingtech companies, a lot of the bigger companies that you've heard of. Andbecause what we do sensitive, we don't talk about those companies a lot. Butyeah, how how I got here is straight out of college, I actually started acompany on my own and the idea behind it was we have all of these differentmessaging platforms that we're communicating on whether it's slack,whether it's email, whether it's even your social media direct messages, it'sjust communication overload, notification overload and it just gotto be too much. But at the same time, facebook was going through CambridgeAnalytica and all these data issues and basically all the social media andmessaging platforms closed off their aPI s overnight, kind of shutting downthe business that was still in closed beta. I didn't have too much bloodsweat and tears into it, but fast forward years later and someone comesto me and pitches the idea of ona, which is hey, we want to take all thesedisparate data sources from a corporation's perspective, bring theminto one central location to give everyone access to their data. And Iwas kind of like, that's like a couple levels above the idea, I had a longtime ago, a much better idea that can have a much bigger impact on the world.And so that's how I came to join and I joined about a year and a half ago, uh,inherited a marketing team with two people and we've since grown To over160 people as a company. My marketing team is almost to 10 people and I alsohead up the business development team, which is seven people strong, wow,that's incredible. So you, so when, when they met you, they were like, allright, this person is, is like, clearly has thought about this a lot. That's,that seems like a really, you know, hand meets glove fit. Well, they were,they were kind of looking for someone...

...who could see the bigger picturebecause right now we have a couple of different use cases that we operate andwe kind of serve customers in right now it's it's more discovery, information,archiving, information governance, but what they were looking for which wassomeone who could see and conceptualize the platform vision of Ona which is youknow, not just the single out of the box use cases, but a company reallycentralizing all of their data in one platform for all of these different usecases, but then also more opportunistic use cases like enterprise searchknowledge management, other things that companies can use their data as acompetitive advantage. And so they are kind of looking for someone who couldunderstand What they were doing now but also the 5-10 year vision. Nice, nice.And and let me ask like, are are you also is ona or you trying to take let'ssay things that are not data sources today, like phone calls andtranscribing them so that they become data sources, right? Like increasingly,especially in this world of zoom that we've been living in video calls andphone calls. Like all of this stuff is actually part of that fabric, isn't it?Yeah, It's funny you say that because with our technology we use OcRtechnology to ingest images and be able to process that data and classify it,we we can adjust video, audio files and make all of these different formatsthat you communicate and especially in a remote world accessible. And it'sactually funny because we launched our integration with zoom this year andwe've had a really tight connection with them and strong customer demandbecause it's all this data that didn't exist before. If you think about, youknow, you and us, we might have been doing this meeting in person in astudio and stuff won't have been recorded over zoom. But now,opportunistically, we can go back and we can look at a lot of stuff thathappened over zoom conversations and we can make sure that that informationdoesn't get lost again from a regulatory purpose. But then also moreforward looking at Jordan from uh if we...

...want to go back and find what we'retalking about. So we don't have to have another hour long meeting aboutsomething that we already sold for a year or two ago. We can come back anddo that if we're able to ingest the information, classify it properly andthen present it in a way that's contextual to what we're talking about.And so there's a lot of cool things that we're going to be doing with datain the future. And I think you and I talked about this before, the more datawe have, the better that it gets, the more that our machine learning modulesstart to learn, the better it can present it, and the stronger that ourtechnology gets. Just the more data that you piped through it. Yeah, verycool. It's it's interesting to think I'm in the world of digitizing orderingfor restaurants and the amount of knowledge and insights that can bepulled from the fact that you're now doing a digital order instead oftelling somebody your order is tremendous. And I never really thoughtabout that in the workplace. So I like being able to kind of search a meeting.I think I would want that. But then I'd have to think about it because I cursea lot and probably that's not good. So whatever. But we're allowed to curse inhis podcast if we fucking want. So that's fine. All right, well look. Uhso, you know, I think that hard luck and work both contribute to gettingpeople to where they are. Give us a story of either, you know, in terms ofyour career where hard work or luck played a role. Yeah. I think it's uminteresting in my case that I've I've never actually reported to someone inmarketing right from the first company that I started to the company afterthat was a seed stage startup where I jumped in and started running digitalmarketing without even knowing that I was doing it to the company after that.Starting a marketing department from scratch. It's just I've never actuallyreported and learn from someone, which I think there's pros and cons to. Ithink one of the cons is you don't get out of the box answers that you cankind of just take and run with and it's...

...kind of an easy way that's prescribedto that you're able to just take that and run with. I think the pro is thatyou're not ingesting old habits, outdated methodologies that you're kindof creating things from scratch and it also takes you going out and findingmentors on your own that can kind of teach you things and so there's thingsthere's people like Ryan Benicio who I know that a lot of people in the R. C.No, he was the former ceo of G to crowd and now he's the CMO of whereby andjust like having people like him as a resource where you can, you can pinquestions off them, ask them different things. And I think that's where therevenue collective can be really helpful for people like me and anyonewho likes to learn on their own, learn by doing things kind of take aninnovative approach And craft things on their own. And so I think that's one ofthe areas that like I said, I didn't necessarily have to pay my own way. Icould have taken like a big corporate route, gone, do a Fortune 500 companyand learned the way that it's done. But you know, that's just not me. That'snot my style and, and that's not throughout that. I wanted to take. Well,look, I mean, how did you meet, how did you meet Ryan? I mean that, that's, didyou, did you just reach out cold and say, hey, I'd love to pick your brainon something or Yeah, I think that a lot of people, if you pay attention tothem, you do some sort of personalization and your genuine, it'snot that hard to get through the big name. People like Ryan for example,he's, you know, one of Forbes most influential cmos and it was just acouple of years ago I reached out to him, he was based in Chicago and I wasgoing through Chicago and I sent him a nice personalized note. Mentioned someof the things that I love that he did at G two and just asked if you wantedto get coffee and he said, yeah, of course. Like talk to my assistant setit up and there's several cases like that if if you're just 1 to 1 withpeople, you don't have an agenda other than you want to learn from them otherthan you want to get better from them another than you want to ask themreally good and well thought through...

...questions and not waste their time. Ithink that people are always more than willing to help out and I think that'sreally a key thing is just like not having agenda. Like if I could sit in aroom with So many people for 30 minutes and just ask them questions. Like mostof the time I'm just trying to learn from them. I don't have an ulterioragenda. And I think that that goes a long way in a lot of cases. I love that.I love it. It's very cool. Sounds like a nice stroke of luck that he said, yes,come meet with me during your visit to Chicago. So look, give us a little bitof a tactic that people can use as they're doing. They're kind of dailywork anything out of your bag of tricks. Yeah, I think that over this last year,if we've learned anything, it's it's how to adapt, right? We've learned howto adapt and are at home lives, we've learned how to adapt in our businesslives and we're really just becoming more resilient people because of it.But one of the use cases I like to learn I like to use is because Ona issuch an enterprise sale, at least at this stage. Field marketing was a hugechannel for us. We were we were doing tons of field marketing events, goingto different cities events, putting on smaller, closed group events outside ofthose that were really fun and engaging. And that was really hard at first whenCovid happened, right, because We kind of thought, how are we going to emulatethe environment of bringing 20 people to New York City, renting out RadioCity music hall, having the Rockets show up on the surprises. We're goingthrough the tour and then have a closed group, 20 person dinner catered and buya nice new york city restaurant. Like how do you take that experience woulddo that's a very enterprise like sales and marketing, motion, and how do youtrans that translate that virtually? And we've had to think a lot about thatas a marketing team, like, because it seems almost impossible to do, right?But it's something that we're wrestling...

...with, and it's something that we'readapting more and more over time. How can we get what's up, what has beensuccessful? So for us, we've of course done a lot more webinars, but westarted trying to go over the top with these virtual events, like how do webring 20 people into a closed door group and surprise them with acelebrity? Like add that element of surprise, surprise them with a magician,surprise them with something to try to replicate that. And actually what wefound is I think that this will be surprising to you. Like the wow factorat least in our opinion, hasn't been that as impactful virtually. And italso hasn't been that important. What what we've gotten from feedback fromtop level executives is they want a closed door group, you know, where theycan be assured that they're not being recorded side sort of India where theycan meet with 20 other people that are in their space that they haven't beenable to meet within the last, you know, year plus and they just want to talk tothem about the problems that they're facing and that hour and a half thatthey're able to spend with 20 other executives that are like them that theyhaven't been able to meet with and bounce ideas off the off with. They'renot looking for a wine tasting event, a beer tasting event that's an hour longwhen they have kids screaming in the background and they've been on zoomcalls all day. Like That's not the experience that like people want thesedays at least in a work from home environment and think about themeetings that like you attend like in the happy hours you event attend, youwant like you enjoy like the fluffy events where like, you know, you'remaybe doing like some lightweight trivia or something or do you enjoylike those 90 minute, like most productive meetings? That's your mostproductive meeting of the week and then maybe you don't have like anything todo the rest of the day. Like for me as a work from home person, that's idealfor me, is like those really productive meetings where we knock out everythingat a high level and then we just get back to business and we're better offbecause of it. And that's at least the route we've been taking. Like reallysuccessful today. Very cool, very cool.

All right, well now we're in thelightning round, we're gonna, we're gonna go quick through these, what's akey position you're hiring for? Key position I'm hiring for is marketingapps. It's not officially approved yet, but I can't stress how importantmarketing apps is. If I was just starting a marketing department today,it would be my first hire. Nice. And then you already gave a shout out toRyan, anybody else to give some shout outs to uh my whole entire team that Ithink does an amazing job. I'd give a shout out to Kyle Lacy at lesson lea Ithink he probably gets shouted out a lot on this, but I think he does agreat job, He's active in the community and he's always just, I've bounced amillion ideas off him too. He's just, you know, he's just one of those folksthat everyone seems to like, I love you, Kyle, you're a good dude, very cool.I'm not going to tag him when I post for this link because people going tothink I'm too close to him or something and get uh probably yeah, exactly,exactly. Alright, well look, all this stuff is pretty good and that's fine. Idon't really care about most of it, I want to know where to eat, that's all Icare about. Where should give me a place in Houston, man. You're downthere now. Yeah, there's um there's a place in Houston called potent and ifI'm vegan and if you think of texas, texas and vegan it doesn't go hand inhand. But I called there chef, they have a private tasting menu. I askedhim if he could do a special vegan one for me and some friends and he totallyaccommodated us. It blew me away was one of the best meals I've ever had andso shout out to Putin Putin. I love it. All right man, peter. So great to haveyou. Thank you for the conversation. Some real good nuggets in there andlooking forward to getting back up to new york and grabbing a drink. Yeah,thanks for having me. Can't wait. All...

...right, that is the show. Thank you somuch for listening. If you love this show, please rate and review in theApple podcast or Spotify, absented to some friends, make sure to smashsubscribe button, get the word out. We're working hard reminder. Thisepisode was brought to you by quarterback quota. Path is the firstradically transparent and to end compensation solution from sales repsto finance, get started for free at quarterback dot com slash revenue dashcollect. I had a lot of fun. Hope you did too. Now go crush those numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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