The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 9 months ago

EP 152: Sales Excellence, E-Sports and Betting On Yourself w/ Danny Read, Metadata

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

EP 152: Sales Excellence, E-Sports and Betting On Yourself w/ Danny Read, Metadata

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Alright everybody. Thank God it's monday. Welcome back to the Pavilion podcast is your host Tom Alamo. Uh This is the show where we bring you the tips tricks tactics that you need to be successful as a revenue leader in today's world. So super excited to hear your episode 1 52 rolling on the episodes here, Getting to close out october uh I've got a great episode today with Danny reed, Danny Reed does all things go to market and as an investor over at metadata, we talk about a lot of stuff, We talk about sales excellence. We talk about being an investor in the business that he works at. Uh He's got a great story about that. We talk about the e sports in the gaming world, which he has a lot of knowledge on uh and everything in between. So there's a lot to be learned from Danny. I think he just has so much knowledge to share with anyone whether you're in sales, whether you're in or getting into angel investing. If you're into any of these other sort of technology trends, definitely an episode you want to tune into. So before we get to that conversation, let's have a quick shout out from our sponsors. This episode is brought to you by Sandoz. So Sandoz, so the leading sending platform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey by connecting digital physical strategies. Companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than ever before. Now, let's get straight into our episode. All right. The man, the myth the legend for metadata. Donny read on the podcast. How are you man? What's up tom? I am feeling great, happy friday, happy friday Indeed excited to be talking with you today. Where are you located right now? So I live in the city in Chicago. I live in South Loop. Okay, nice. I'll be heading there uh for a wedding actually coming up in a couple of weeks right after Labor Day. Let me know if you need some recommendations when you're in town. My only spot that I know in Chicago is lou Malnati's for deep dish pizza. That's, that's the only thing I know about Chicago. Yeah, we're known for deep dish. A lot of locals like it every now and then. But we do have good pizza in general. But loses is my top choice for pizza place. It's debatable. People have different opinions on that but loses my spot. The best spot. I I always recommend everybody when they come here is to try to get a reservation at girl and the goat. Um Stephanie Izard, uh Iron chef, Amazing food. It's not like a break the bank place either. It's not like super expensive. So if you can look at it and see if they have any reservations. It's a great spot to go to. I love it. Well I will, I will check that out. So we've got a lot of ground to cover in this one. Maybe you can just let us know um a little bit about what you're doing at metadata to start because you're linked in title was a little vague for me to understand, you know, like all things go to market would love to hear, you know, what's happened in the day to day there. Yeah, so to clear that up, I'm...

...in a in an enterprise I. E. So I am also an investor in the company though. And so I I do quite a bit here where a startup, I came to a startup because I want to wear a lot of different hats. But my day to day job is a E I O N A quota. That's what I'm doing day to day, but I still like to work with the sdrs marketing the product and in cross functional teams and work on a lot of different projects based on customer feedback, all that good stuff. But that's the day to day job is being being in a how did that come to be like, did you invest? And then as you, you know, learn more about the company you wanted to work there or how do if you don't mind me asking? No. Yeah, it's a fun story. So like I spent uh G2 crowd was G2 now was the kick starter for my career. So I was the first str hired there or second walter was was technically the first and then um spent four years, Their first two years was mostly like player coach role, his team leads. So helping build out the team, we grew very quickly so it was me and then like eight months later there was like seven of us. And then after that it turned into 20 and then they grow it even more. So the first two years was that and then spent two years selling. But the metadata italian is that I sold GTs product to metadata about three years ago to our Ceo bill. And what I don't want to make this a pitch for the for the podcast. But like what metadata does is we help activate intent data for dimension marketers want to. And so G two has this great data set of intent data that they're selling. And so there was a natural sort of synergy or combo right away that I realized. And so when I was still at G. Two and so that deal I had gotten metadata partnered with G. Two and we started going to market together on deals and then fast forward two years later uh one thing led to another and my former boss Olivier had left G. Two as the S. V. P. Of sales and became the president and metadata. And pretty much right when I saw that I'm like all right, I this is probably my next move because I had certainly got to know the metadata team through that and joined as an EE back in feb feb one of 2020. So I've been there been here for about a year and a half and then like six months into the gig, I decided to kind of go all in and invest a lot of money into the company and sort of bet on myself mentality. Um, so that's why for the vague sort of linked in title, but super excited to be here, we've been growing like crazy and it's been a blast. How did that, how did that work in terms of like the actual investment? Like is that just something that's open to all employees or because you knew people and you've been working with them for so long that you were able to do that. Um Like I imagine at a lot of companies you probably maybe can't do that or maybe people start exploring that as an option. I'm just, I'm curious if that's a rare thing for me to be seen, Well every everybody's money's green. Right? And so when especial, especially like when they're raising, if you're at an early startup and they're raising there there a there be there, see like they're not, maybe not every company does this, but like there's no harm in...

...asking like, hey, I want to put in some money for our series a and you can be added as an investor and then depending on how you want to do that, there's usually two routes one, you go direct through your Ceo or through um the lawyer and you get your own sort of sheet. The benefit of doing it this way too is like you sort of can piggyback on the legal work that the V. C. Has already done. So I get the same terms that the VCS because I I participated in it. The other route is you can go through like a syndicate, somebody else's helping lead it. They pull a bunch of money together. That's usually if you want to put in like 10-K. Or something smaller, they get a big pool and then the syndicate brings it to the ceo and that's how the money is in. So those are usually the two routes in. But if you're somebody that you know is passionate about your company and you have a good outlook for it. Obviously you can ask for comp in terms of shares which you absolutely should be doing. But then too, if you truly do believe in the company to you can put money directly into the company, just ask your leadership and usually there's always a small fund that goes along with that for metadata. We have a ton of employees that have invested a ton of customers that have invested. So um yeah that's kind of the background. I love it. Um Is angel investing something that you're doing outside of that or is it just like, hey I I see the vision here and like, I'm going all in betting on myself and the team here. Uh Yeah, the former, so betting on myself here, um, I definitely plan to do more investing later in my career, once I have the capital, but for right now it made the most sense that I have some tangible control over my investment in this way. Um, so that was what I sold myself on for doing it. Um and two, it's just, it feels good to kind of bet on the horse that, that you're growing right? Or, or riding. So all in on myself are all in on metadata. I love it. I love it. So something that stuck out to me when I was doing some research about you, uh, was E sports. Um, and it looks like you got into the game over a decade ago and it's, it's starting to bubble up now. I feel like even right now a lot of the public maybe probably underestimates how big e sports are and and how big it's going to probably get in the next decade, walk me through, like, how did you get involved so early in that world? Uh, just sort of my luck. Um, I was, I mean, I was a kid at that point. So what I mean, I played a lot of games growing up, I mostly played Call of Duty, I played all the classic sports games and whatnot, But um, in halo, but FPs shooters, so got into Call of Duty played that game for years and years and it was probably like the equivalent of what you would call like a G league player compared to the NBA that's like the level of skill I was at, where I was playing with pros all the time. And it was very informal back then, like there was only one major sort of uh tournament facilitator which was major league gaming MlG bought by Activision, but we would play in those tournaments and that was like my sort of community, like I just sort of the route I was going and then after that I had a bunch of buddies that we had um I had joined...

...them, they had started a company called 3 60 icons and 3 60 icons was a tournament website dedicated to hosting college tournaments on the weekends and they would give out like price pools for it. And so I joined as part of them and we grew the website to is something like 100 150,000 users back in 7 2008, which back then is just crazy, so ton of potential. We had a huge brand. We had done the largest ever like, console tournament of its time back then broke the record for it, or worked with Machinima, R. I. P that no longer business right now. But so I got a lot of experience with that and just learned how all that works, But like it's just it's so informal like you can't can't stress that enough, it didn't really feel like a job or a business, I'm only like 18 19 at the time. So but that was sort of my entry into the world and a lot of those guys that I had played with and played in our tournaments are now people that own the sports teams and are you know 10 million plus like network people like made shots and and others. So I had a very early glimpse into that world. The early culture of it, it is a very difficult industry to get a job in. It's the same as sports because um I mean I could talk about this all day but like that's that's sort of my background on the sports um And I did want to make that my career originally but it is next to impossible to find like an entry level job that pays well that you don't have to relocate for. And me being a broke college kid with a bunch of loans just I couldn't do it. Um And so I pursued a job in tech and I landed thankfully I landed at G. Two and I got very lucky and grateful for a map but still keeping my eye on it I on it and still planning to make investments or potentially take my career there when when the opportunity comes up. I love it. Um So take me back to Those days, right graduating school? Uh some debt you got into sales at G2 was that was was finance? Like the main motivator to get into sales or something else? Yes and so like it was sort of a combo of a few things, a lot of what I back then I remember in a lot of my interviews like I wanted to be a business owner today, I now understand the landscape a little bit better, I understand the stress that comes with that and different things and I'm still sort of weighing like what I want to do with my life, but back then it was like I want to be a business owner, I want to own my own business and I knew that sales was like the ultimate skill set that you need to grow and gain in order to be any type of successful entrepreneur. So that was the original motivation and then yes like the sales jobs are some of the easier jobs to get entry level out of school versus doing like a classic internship route for, you know for people that don't graduate with a medical degree or like a specific degree that gets them access to a program, they're supposed to do sales and marketing and some of these other principles and business, it's it can be difficult to land a good job right out of the gate, but sales, there's there's a lot of opportunity out there for people. Yeah. What what was the what were the early days of sales like for you? Did you have relatively quick success? Was it a...

...painful star? Um What were the early days like for you at G. Two? I was very fortunate that I have I don't have like a big like war story or horror stories or anything that from my first job like I loved the first people I work with and that's why I feel very grateful for the time. I had a key to where I came in as pretty much BDR number one and six months into that. So then first six months I'm just like grinding and trying to learn the job, learn a cold calling, emailing, script writing processes and so six months it's just like I'm in the office till eight o'clock every day, going home playing a game, going to bed, going back to work, did that for six months. And then after that it's like okay now I got the hang of it, I started to see some success. I started to get a bunch of meetings booked up for a S. And then after that we had a leadership change and then we raised a bunch of money and then it was just like pouring gasoline on the fire, it's like Danny, you're a veteran even even though it's only six months you need to come help train like all the new people that we just hired. so then that's what I started to do. And a lot of that early work was G two cells into multiple departments. They sell to marketing to sales to see us to leadership. So a lot of it was like persona mapping, so building out these sheets that just like had, okay, these personas care about this, this is how our product ties into it here. The different pitch points, like it was a lot of that work at the beginning. Um and then slowly just following a lot of people on linkedin and learning myself just like learning better tactics for how to email, how to cold call how to stand out of the crowd and do things like that. That was 1st, 1st 2 years from Miyagi to Coming in early at a company like that, right? Like for you second str and it turned out that G2 is an amazing company. Is that something that you would recommend for others that are coming out of school? Like get in somewhere early enough where if you do do well like that, the opportunities right there for you, you know, versus going in maybe it's somewhere like, You know, a 10,000 person company where you're it feels like you're just a number. I honestly don't know, I've never worked for a big a big company like that. I have friends that have but for me I just landed at the perfect spot perfect time. So like Yeah, I would say anybody if you can find a job that you landed the first or second str and the company is about to raise and grow like crazy in six months like. Yeah that would be crazy to not turn that down. But the risk when you join a startup like that is like it can fall flat and so it's tough to say but I'm certainly happy with the choice I had and it would definitely make it again so to give you maybe a straight answer like I prefer working at a startup. I feel like you gain way more skills and you sort of you have to be okay with like ambiguous sort of work like not like you said being a number going to a desk, here's your job task task, task, task task being at a startup blessing and a curse. You get the freedom to kind of sort of create your own day and learn new things but you have to have the confidence and the personality to do that. So it's two different sort of coins. Yeah and I remember a couple years ago that seeing you when the sales rep of the year which is sponsored by chili piper I think two years ago um I was like dang I wish I won that uh walk me through, walk me...

...through like what was that whole thing about was that like voted by peers and customers and and how how the hell did you win that? Yeah. So the it was opened up to anybody that wanted to enter the criteria for. It was based on one deal that you were to submit. And then there was a list of criteria for how that deal would be judged. And a lot of it was like, how did you pull together your team to help with this deal? What did you do on their side? How did you go above and beyond for this deal? Like, details like that? So, it was a huge sort of checklist of different things. And the for the reason I ended up winning it is because I put in like way more effort than pretty much anybody else did. Just because I I know that because I talked to a lot of the judges where a lot of almost everybody pretty much just submitted like a word, a word sheet because it was like explain your deal and give out all the details. So like they just typed up in word and they submitted it. And I was like, all right, I'm like, I'm an smb refugee to at that time I'm not selling enterprise deals million dollar deals. Like somebody's going to crush me if I just try and go in with that. So the only way I knew to stand out was to get a really creative deal where I had to bring in a lot of people and there's a story story telling you had, I told the story of how everything happened. And the funny thing is is like it was metadata, it was my metadata deal. And so I I had put that in there and I kind of laid everything out and the purpose was because I sold them, they had a case study right away, we co sell that case study together because again the products worked really well. But then it was the process of how did I loop in the partnership team at G two to be part of that deal? How did I work with the metadata team and the sort of complex sales process that we had with them just given the nature of a lot of data being exchanged back and forth and how we were going to go to market together. But then so the reason I end up winning is I took all of that, put it all down on paper and then I sent it to one of my best friends eric who designed it and he turned it into an infographic. And so then I eric yeah shout out to eric one of my good good buddies and he actually works a lot of my customers now that metadata but as a consultant, if you need design work, hit me up pc is great but he sent me that back and then that's what I submitted for the contest and the judges told me pretty much like nobody did that. And so that was the big reason why I stood out and then I think that obviously the criteria part of it too was the reason I ended up winning. So very very fortunate and chili pipers, a customer reminded metadata, very good friends with their director of dementia and kelly so shout out to Kayleigh. But yeah I was very very lucky and still super grateful. I won that because when you win awards like that you just kind of get a lot of notoriety, you get a lot of people that reach out to you sort of get this weird status symbol attached to you. So it was a blast for those few months. Did a few podcasts on that too, but very fortunate to win that, I love that. Was there a was there like a cash prize or like a gift card or something or just all recognition? Um It was a $10,000 cash prize for it, not cash, they made out a check. So yes that was great. And it's like funny because like I I won the 10 grand and like we're all working in...

...sales, like we get commission checks like that all the time, but the better part of it actually was it was 10 grand and it was a three grand stipend or like expense to take out your team for dinner. And so what I did with that if anybody here is familiar with Chicago is like I took my three managers that have been with me at G. Two and I took them all to Alinea which rated the number one restaurant the world multiple times. Crazy crazy place. And so I used that and we went over budget a little bit we spent more than that but we just floated the rest. Um And that was actually the experience that was really cool to just I had to spend that money on that. And so it was fun to get the excuse to spend that level money on a dinner and go to a place like that. That is what I actually remember most and being able to share that with my three managers who to this day are still some of my closest friends. So that's that's like when the quarterback wins M. V. P. And then they take all the offensive lineman to like a steak dinner. So I think so yeah I listened to remember like I listened to Pat Mcafee's podcasts when Aaron Rodgers goes on and he's always given his offensive lineman crap about what gift he's going to get him. And so his alignment got him like a Mercedes like golf cart with his own like being branded on it stuff like that. Just what things only crazy rich people do. Yeah it must have been fun to play the part for for a night though player. Aaron Rodgers roll. Yeah. Yeah it was nice to be able to you know, take care of people that, that have helped you along the way, right? It's a, it's a gratifying feeling. Yeah, I'd love to learn about, you know, you seem to have your hands in some different pots, you seem to be well versed, like in, in the startup world in investing and we talked about e sports, what are some resources that you like look into other people that you follow, that, that talk about some of these things that helps you kind of keep your eye on like where the puck's going, so to speak. Yeah, that's a good question. Honestly, like most of the news I consume is in my linkedin feed, I obviously have friends and whatnot that I keep in touch with and I learned from them, but like I'm linked in, I, I remember earning a lot of my learning a lot of my early sales knowledge from people like uh like morgan ingram who's a friend, john borrows the team over there. They post a lot of really great content on linkedin, especially if you're a younger salesperson, you just don't know this stuff like having a resource like that to constantly look at scott barker from outreach. Another guy followed and a bunch of other guys, so that's a really good resource for your young salesperson to get on linkedin and follow those guys. Um I, you know, I've kind of outgrown a lot of that content now from where I'm at, but like it was such a helpful tool to have in the arsenal. And then for e sports, a lot of, it's like reading headlines, reading news. I had a shout out to john Davidson, I had been part of a company for a little bit that was like a e sports trade association. So he's doing some work with that chris smith is somebody to follow if you're into e sports. He does great linked in live podcasts where he sort of talks, he runs his own consulting agency out of...

Australia I think. And um, just sort of talks about concepts and curates a bunch of news that's helpful. There's so much of it, so trying to make sense of all of its tough. But yeah, it's just repetition, seeing a lot of content, digesting it, talking to other people about it. It's really the only thing I can say. Yeah, I mean, it just feels like we're going through a massive shift, like in terms of entertainment in terms of, you know, financial, like ways that people can invest money. It just, maybe this is just me. But it feels like all these new things like e sports when we're talking about, you know, things like Bitcoin, whether it's the opportunity to angel invest so early, which I don't think you probably could have done 10 years ago, 20 years ago. And so I think all these opportunities I think are, you know, more relevant and more, uh you know, opportunistic for people. So it's always good to just kind of keep your eye on the prize of what's interesting to you 100% and it's overstated so much, but be curious is definitely one, but like take action on that curiosity. So like if you want to angel invest like to swear, like sucking, ask somebody about it, like go talk to somebody like try to and even if like they call you, you know, if you ask dumb questions fine, you gotta ask it a bunch of dumb questions to figure out where the smart questions are, right? So just like be proactive in those things and you have those interests, like it's on you that you're the only person that can help yourself grow, so put it into action. Yeah, absolutely. I'm curious before we we got a couple of rapid fires before we get to that, I want to ask just about from going to G2 and metadata, just uh what you're seeing in the intent data world. Um I was in that world for a number of years, working at Tech Target and I think at at my current company where I'm at gong, you know, we use it. Um I think it's it's one of the levers in the go to market world that's uh I think super important for a company to be involved with and there's a lot of different players and the space. So I'd love to just hear you talk about the space as a whole, um what you're seeing out there in the landscape. Yeah, it's like I I have this conversation a lot and everybody sort of use it differently because intent inherently is starting to be synonymous with A. B. M. And there are two very different things. Like the value of intent is when you have a large tam and your intent helps you figure out which accounts in those time we should go after intent is part of an A. B. M. Strategy. Like it depends on how you define A Bm. You asked a marketer what IBM is you get 10 marketers, you get 10 different answers, but I think it's a very useful tool again for people that have large accounts are large tams that they can then whittle down who they should be going after. The challenging part about intent is activating it, you need your reps on it, you need a process for how to follow it. People do this differently, their salesforce integrations for how reps can use it. There's ways to use it in targeting if you're a marketer, which is the conversation I have every day. So we talk a lot about intent because we pretty much partner with every intent provider out there to then help them upload that as a list and then we help them advertise out to those accounts on multiple different channels are tech helps us do that, But that's, that's...

...sort of a broad maybe if you have it but curious if you have a take on it or not. Yeah, I mean I feel like for from a sales person, one of the biggest questions is always like people talk a lot about what do I say in my email or my cold call. But to me, I think the bigger question oftentimes is like, am I talking to the right person, which I think in the right when done well, intent data helps to solve for right because you can't control timing and I think timing has a huge impact on whether, you know, an email gets responded to whether a deal goes through and so on and so forth. So I think the right answer to that, that intent data question depends on the company and what you're trying to do and everything like that. But I think it's something that every go to market team should be investing in in general to help them narrow down like, you know, find the needle in the haystack or the or improve, you know what the conversion rate looks like so that I feel very strongly about it. I, I agree with that. It's a very useful tool to have. The only thing I caution people is like make sure you have a plan for how you're going to use it once you get it because I see a lot of companies that buy it because it looks shiny and nice and then they never actually put together a way to have those be prioritized the process for how it makes its way through the marketing channels or two sales. So make sure you have that defined for yourself prior to purchasing and you'll be good. 100% agreed. I've definitely seen plenty of use cases where you can kind of sell the dream. So to speak of this is what the technology can do. But if you're not, I guess you could say it's about a lot of sense, but if you're not actually implementing it and harvesting it, then it's useless. Right? So all right, let's get to a couple of rapid fires to get to know a little bit better. So, first we're big learners on this podcast Danny. What's a book or a few books that have impacted your, your life, your career? It could be sales, it could be business, it could be fiction, it doesn't matter. But just curious if there's anything that stands out. Yeah, I am a huge Game of Game of Thrones fan. I first thing is like, I hated the ending, but I love the Song of Ice and Fire books I've read all of them. So, and then the harry potter is The Lord of the Rings. I've read a lot of those fantasy novels. So those are the ones that stick out to me from a business standpoint to be completely honest. I haven't really found too many that have been that useful that maybe isn't the popular answer, but I find a lot more value in like the content that I see on linkedin literal like today's world, What are things that I can be doing right now to put into practice books can give you a better, maybe philosophical sense of like timeless advice and for that, how to win friends and influence people is a staple. Never split the difference. Um there's another uh I think those are the two that I usually always reference, which is probably nothing new. I'm sure others have have said that on this podcast, but those are the two that stick out. But yeah, I'm not a huge fan of reading like a ton of books. I'm much more would rather follow people in...

...my industry and learn like what's something new that people are doing that I can start to use to stick out and in sales or BDR life or things like that. Well that's why I phrased the question um the way I did like to include something like fiction because sometimes it's also helpful if you're just grinding at your desk, your virtual desk all day. Like sometimes that's not what you want to do after a long day or to start the day. Like my my one of my co we all had some Covid like habits that we picked up or or different routines. One of mine was I read through all the harry potter books for the first time And just crush through them. And uh it was like I don't know what where, you know, 10 year old or 12 year old me was but like I wasn't reading those books and I love them. So I can definitely I'm definitely there with you on that. Uh maybe lord of the rings is next. It's tough to be the harry potter books. They're they're great. I've read them I think three times through now. So if you wait a couple years it's nice because you forget all the details you can go back and and relive it a little bit which is which is cool. But Yeah, my fiance I think read all of them at least 27 times so it still hasn't worn down on her. Um All right, next question uh what's bumping on your Spotify right now? What type of music are you listening to nowadays? Oh man. I so my fiance and I joke like she is the type of person that can listen to a song once or watch a movie once and instantly remember all the lyrics and or quotes from the movie. Like I am not that person at all. I am not too, I'm not like crazy into music. I like actually like um when I'm working there's a if you go to Spotify there's a specific playlists I think called focus. Um And there's no lyrics in them. It's just sort of mellow beats that are there. I'll put that on in the background a lot. I'm actually a decently big, like john Mayer fan, I like his recent album, Sabra, he just came out with. So I've been listening to that and uh, I like, um, there's two sort of lesser known people. I think it's bozzi and day Glo or to just sort of random artists that I've seen on Spotify and listen to their songs and like them. So go with that. All right. I like it. I like the focus music. I like john Mayer, I can't speak to the last two. Um, but I dig it. Um, what about any of you mentioned some of your favorite folks on linkedin. How about any other do you listen to podcasts or Youtube channels you follow or anyone, whether it's for tactical advice or you find inspirational or, or anything like that that you tend to tune into. Not anymore. I feel like I've gotten to the point where I just burned myself out on content where I just, I literally see the same thing posted over and over again. I'm just at that point where I've consumed too much. So I'm just starting to take a little bit of a break with it, but like some of the guys I mentioned earlier are definitely still guys that have great advice trying to get some others. Like I know Jake Dunlap over, it's scaled is big on linkedin. I don't, I don't really know of any Youtube channels. It's mostly linked in feed that I see through my connections. But yeah, that's that's that's the raw, honest answer is I I've just sort of over consumed over the...

...last couple of years that I'm sort of taking a break from it right now just so I can focus on my stuff and things like that. I dig it. I dig it. All right. Last one for you is or second to last one, sorry, is what's one piece of advice you'd give to someone starting off their sales career. So first thing, classic advice is go find the rap that is crushing it and is doing really well. Is the leader at the company figure out, always spend time with them, buy them lunch, buy them coffee, learn what they're doing, get like don't figure out the sort of fundamentals. First, what do you know that people around you are doing well, learn that, that that's a process to get to that point. Um, and then once you have those solid fundamentals down and you're sort of mimicking and copying, not reinventing the wheel, but copying mimicking others things. The next piece of advice I would say after that is like now figure out a way to be different and like make it yourself. So like we're all fighting for people's attention. There's God knows how many products in the sauce world and limited buyers of people that get this outreach all day. So you have to find a way to stick out from the crowd and be different. That can mean a lot of different things. So like maybe an example is when I was an enterprise BDR G two, one thing I would do is I would tweet out like the grid placements of like where companies were usually targeting like leaders obviously and uh one example of that is I did that with Marc Benioff and I tweeted out and play three times with this and he finally took it and re tweeted it out to everybody because it showed sales first year round, like number one in the Crm quadrant. So then I did that the only two, maybe big ones were him and then chuck Robbins, Ceo of Cisco, so I then screen shotted that and then put a link to the twitter profile and then use that to go hit up execs at salesforce and say, hey Mark, the big guy is paying attention to this. You should to come have a chat with us type thing. So that was maybe like one maybe extreme example, but it worked for us and you to find something like that, that nobody's really going to have that because it's it's G two, they have a weird way that they can prospect everybody but find something that lets you stick out. I see a lot of people like playing guitar music is part of like a video those into a prospect. Like try to find something that you like it enjoyed incorporated into it. So that way when the VP or whoever you're reaching out to reads it, they're like, all right, I never get outreach like this, this is good. And then if it's timely, you really heighten your chances to see some success there. So recap, find the best person at your job at your company, try to mimic and copy what they do once you feel solid about that, figure out a way to be different and make it your own and that's how you can learn and grow such great advice, such great advice. Um my last one for you before we wrap up Pavilion big on building community, starting, you know, partnerships, relationships, things like that, networking, what's your number one networking tip or building business relationships to? The answer is, is basic and you could say this little bit everything, but it's like making sure that you're being useful and helpful to others. Um First and foremost, like if you just do that, like a lot of the...

...other stuff takes care of itself. So sort of classic example is a good buddy of mine, his name is George, we met at a built in Chicago event here, he was works for the Toronto stock exchange and he came to build an event came up to the g to booth and his fiance was coming to school here in Chicago and he was like looking for jobs to start to relocate and like just right away when I talked to the guy it's like we had a natural sort of connection, we sort of hit it off and I like helped him figure out if G. Two is going to be a good job for him. I was just in a at the time like I'm not hiring manager, I'm not anything but like good people. I want to take care of other good people. So talk talk to HR team fortunately we had a visa issue so we couldn't but then like I helped try to get him into into other people I knew in the industry so like right there like as soon as you find find somebody else that you want to be around because generally they're a good person or you know there's some sort of value in it for you figure out what your value you can deliver back to them is and give with no ask in return like do that over and over and over again and then that's how you'll be seen and that's how people will get to know you. That's probably number one, number two. And it's sort of just another example of this like when I was at G. Two and we were at that growth point at like six months to a year we're going to hire so many people because they told us like what the plan was and I knew how tough it was to get a job there because we were, we were like 1% of less than 1% of people get hired there because they have this crazy aptitude tests and other things that they have to do. So I was like, okay, we're going to hire a bunch of really talented people. This is my first job, this is a really good opportunity for me to like start to expand my network because now the G two alumni is my network now that I'm gone from there and so now my network is dependent on my past job. So when I was in that seat, I would always reach out to like the new hires and say, hey, I'm Danny, I've been here for a year, um I'm more than happy to sit down with you and give you the lay of the land or help you with anything with onboarding and just develop relationships that way again. Like just giving with no ask in return, do that over and over and the rest will take care of itself for you. That's the name of the game man, that's great advice, I appreciate you spending some time with me this morning, maybe just for folks that want to connect with you that want to learn more about, I mean all the different topics we talked about whether it's intent, data, sales, e sports, Angel investing, we've covered a lot in like 35 minutes. What's the best place for for folks to connect with you? Yeah. Find me on linkedin is easiest. It's pretty much the only social I I keep up with. So linkedin slashing Danny read. Um, is the easiest way awesome Danny. I appreciate you coming on man. You gotta sound, thanks for having me. Thanks for checking out that episode. Um, all podcasts in october are going to be brought to you by the lovely people at Sandoz. So they deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make your outreach more personal. I'll be back next monday with another episode. Until then feel free to hit me up on linkedin. My name is tom a limo and go out and get after it peace. See some bad, say something.

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