The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 80: A Deep Dive on Sales Process w/ Scott Clary

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Ep 80: A Deep Dive on Sales Process w/ Scott Clary

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Revenue Collective podcast. I am your host, Brandon martin and you're listening to Is this a good time the show where I asked revenue collected members some really basic questions. They have good answers. We talked for 15 minutes. It's a lot of fun. You get the drift by now. You've been listening for 30 episodes. I hope it's Tuesdays and Thursdays. The show comes out and go ahead and hit subscribe that way. You don't miss any episodes today. Our guest is scott. Clary and scott is the S. V. P. Of Sales and Marketing at Excite Em, which just got acquired by Grass Valley and we go deep on sales process. This episode was brought to you by quota path. A commission tracking software built for sales operations, finance and accounting teams. If running commissions and payroll has you running for the hills quota path is for you quote a path helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay their teams accurately and on time every time. Keep your team motivated and on target. Simplify your commissions at quarter past dot com slash revenue dash collective. And give your reps the gift of transparency. All right, let's do this. Episode 30 30. Is this a good time? Alright, we're here with scott clary. I'm so excited to have you on man. He is the S. V. P. Of sales and marketing at Excite em. He is an ad vid, avid podcaster himself with his own party. Gotta plug that right up front, but really pumped to have you on man. Thank you. Thank you. I'm excited to get into this. Let's uh let's go into it. We got to, we got 15 minutes to go through everything. So I want to keep it short and sweet. I love that. I love that. Well look, you know, it's all meat. No filler. As you just said, tell everyone what role you're in include the podcast because it's really great and tell us how you got there. Cool. So full time, you know, 9 to 5 job is uh, sales and marketing. So I head that up at X item X item is an O E. M, an affiliate of Grass Valley. We produce all SAAS products for Grass Valley's target customer base, which is enterprise, our broadcast customers. So we do everything from audience engagement. If you ever watching american Idol text and to vote, that...

...would be our software. We do a lot of live streaming tech. Um, we do a lot of virtual events as well for companies because we have that audience engagement plus video delivery. So that's where I'm working right now. I head up, you know, I'm almost like entrepreneurial residents, so I do wear many hats between sales and marketing, jumping on demos, strategy hiring and onboarding, take the market strategy, you know, a little bit of product marketing as well, so a lot of different things, which is kind of why I got the role and why wasn't I was excited about the role. You mentioned the podcast as well. So success story podcast where interview incredible individuals unpacked their playbooks their life, like basically how they got to where they are. So you know, I'm gonna plug that, you can go check it out. But that's, you know, my background was always in sales. Individual contributor worked in large telephone. Canada Bell Canada similar to Verizon at and T in the States, worked my way up through retail, although through the sMB mid an enterprise left worked as a enterprise sales, basically another telco called digicom. Um but that was when I had my first sales leadership opportunity After that, that company exited to private venture capital. And then I left did consulting for about 2.5 3 years. And then I went back to work for somebody, work for somebody, which is where I'm at right now at grass values nice. And what did you know how to, you know, I would say a lot of people maybe today are leaving school and understand they want to be in sales, but maybe back when you did it, that was more rare. Did you know, you want to be in sales? I mean, telecom sales doesn't exactly ring is the most, you know, amazing thing you want to do day one out of school. But tell me about it. Yeah, for sure. So my back, my entire family are police or law enforcement. Um I was supposed to go into law enforcement, but I want to take a step further. So actually I was doing pre law and my undergrad sort of setting myself up for law school at the time, making money selling cell phones. Internet in retail was the most money...

...you could really make as a student, maybe outside of like waitressing or waiting or whatnot or bartending. So I was making good money. We're not we're not going to know, I'm just kidding. Yeah. No. So so I was working, I was working on my first sales job really and I was making good money, I was good at it. I'm like, you know, I'm a nerd at heart, so like it came pretty easy for me because I think that when you got a little bit more technical like sort of where I differentiate myself was like fixing problems that customers had that were more technical nature, which ended up, you know, landing me sales and landing me deals. And I didn't really understand, I didn't connect the dots that's kind of acting as like a quasi sales engineer at a retail level at that point. But it worked really well and I was good at it and I was personable, you know, I was, you know, outgoing and all those things that seem to sort of vibe with like that natural, natural salesperson that has no idea actually why they're, you know, what they're doing and why it's working. But it seems to work. And then I kept going, I kept, so when I was in university, I moved into small market, so like it would still be to be, but it was small business and I was doing well there as I finished my undergrad, I'm like, I have two options. I can either go into law school, which is another five years of school or I can double down on what I'm doing now. And I basically said I'll give myself five years, I'll give myself five years, see how I do in sales and sort of like working up the private corporate ladder because again, whole families and law enforcement, none of my family was really in private at that time, like like you know, father grandfather, they were not in private enterprise, even that was a stretch for me, forget entrepreneurship software, all this stuff was like very different from my family was used to, so I just, I sort of kept doing it and kept every year moving into a different market, a bigger market, more responsibility, more revenue, higher targets and you know, presidents club making awesome bonuses. Um you know, the commission was great, so I'm like this is, this is awesome, and I, I stuck with it till I was dealing with like you know, Fortune 500 Fortune 100 clients and that, that, that's actually at the point where I...

...wanted to be strategic and actually move into sales leadership, which is why I left a larger company where I felt like there was a slower, like slower progression to move through the ranks between manager director. I wanted to get into that leadership role and get that experience like mid twenties. So then I moved into a smaller telescope where I had that opportunity after you taste the success of sales and its immediate to go like let me go have a big impact at a VC backed company, go from smaller, big I love that by the way my father is a police officer from new york city, my mom's a nurse like like I under I understand this this journey man because you know I even talked to them today about stuff that I'm doing in my in my company bite and it's a little bit it's a far into them like you strange, super strange like and then you talk about entrepreneurship and selling software and I was doing some consulting and working for my own company for a bit and it's all like whoa what the hell are you doing scott? But like I love it, I love it and I never looked back really love it man. Well look it takes hard work and luck to get to where you are. Give us your talking a little bit about the hard work we can hear, I can hear it in the way you progress your career. Any stories on luck or hard work that you want to highlight. Yeah. So the first time I moved into true sales leadership, like I've held team lead roles before when I was working in like big telco, but when I was working at the smaller telco I was hired on as an account executive basically 23 months into working there. The director who hired me left for Salesforce dot com. So there was an open opportunity. It was not supposed to be going to me, but I took initiative. I put together a pitch deck. I put together a 135-year plan for the sales and marketing organization. I was just putting together where I wanted to take them basically learning from any resource that I had because I hadn't had any actual experience doing. At that point, I presented to the owner of the company was an owner operated company as well as the director of sales when he was on his way out. And that was my first sales leadership role. So they moved me into that role because I took that initiative put together this deck. I've...

...never done it snowballs and my career ever. And it paid off. It was like right time, right place, like who would have thought I would have been hired right, when the director was on his way out, that wasn't really, it worked out well and, and I took advantage of it and it and it paid off. So it was like the first, it was a cool story. I I like that story a lot. And also it's because it's the first time I realized that if I actually just want something, obviously there's a lot of layers to this, but you take enough steps and this is actually, you know, very easy. Like I wanted this, I did a presentation, I put in the research in the effort and it was presented to me. That's very nice. It doesn't always happen so easily. But it was a taste of like, if you want to just take it, just get it and find the way, find the steps you gotta take to get to where you want to be. And if you actually on those, even if it's short or long term, like it ends up working out, it's just baby steps, right? It sounds so silly, but like the worst that can happen is they say no, but like, hey, you learned a lot and you showed initiative the next time that something interesting comes up, they will come back and be like, man, that's scott. Like he understood how to put a business plan together, right? Um, you know, you're looking at like, unless you're working for it dot org, everybody in your organization wants to make more money, figure out a way to do that aligns with what do you want to do and pitch it? I love that man, that's great. Look, you talked to so many amazing leaders, so I'm hoping you drop some value here. Don't go nuts on me. But what is what's a tactic that, that you think that people should do in their everyday life in sales and marketing? Uh, you want to, you know, so for this? Um, yes, I speak to a lot of amazing leaders who have a lot of amazing people that I've learned from over my career and I'm going to talk about something that I do because I also managed only sales individuals today. So this is obviously, you know, some of my experience plus people that I've learned from, uh, probably some of the people that, you know, some of the people that you probably spoken to and...

...some of the people that, you know, SaM has spoken to on sales hacker as well. Those are sort of the people that I grew up with and that I listen to and learn from. So sales and marketing alignment. So let's talk about how to align sales and marketing in terms of social selling and why you should be social selling and how to do it. We're gonna do this briefly. There's a lot of nuances of this, but I want to outline what I do right now. So we're talking about an outbound campaign, you're identifying your ideal customer profile, your buyer persona, you're going to be, you know, 7 to 15 touch points in A B, two B environment, give or take across email, phone and linkedin. Now, when you do those touch points a couple ways to optimize those outbound touchpoints you're going to use, of course you're going to personalize everything. But the two, I guess strategies that I use for the actual content is pattern disruption and why you why now? Pattern disruption if I'm not mistaken, comes from Aaron ross. Why you, why now comes from Jeff Hoffman pattern disruption just means you're sending out an email that's personalized. But it's saying something along the lines of for our first email and a cadence. Is this the right individual to speak to you about marketing technology? Is this the right person to speak to you about automating your sales process? Very succinct to the point hyper personalized because it's talking about something that that person who you're reaching out to, that buyer persona should be responsible for, but you're not going into a pitch, you're not making it a pitch, you're just breaking the monotony of the different types of emails are going to be getting from all the other sales reps because all the other sales after coming with these wordy, lengthy pitches, you're doing a one liner straight to the point. They, it's almost like, um, they recognize your authority in being able to deliver such to the point question and it does really differentiate from everything else that they're getting almost respect, right? It's almost like, yes. All right. I'm not, let me just respond exactly. And that's what you want. You want to get the conversation started because like the most difficult thing to do in sales is to get a conversation...

...started. So with that pattern disruption, what happens is they'll either say, no, I'm not the person, this is the person or they'll confirm that they are truly the person that's responsible for this particular thing you're trying to sell them. And that's when you can kick off the conversation. So that's one thing that I use and I'm going to tie this back to social selling as well. That's one thing that I use for email and lengthen outreach for an initial touch point and then I'll also use a Y you why now? So why you why now is something that was done by Jeff Hoffman? He also has his own sales podcast. What that is is it's basically an email that discusses why I'm reaching out to you and why is there a meaningful event in your company's life cycle that justifies me reaching out to you about the product that I'm trying to sell. So I would follow up with the pattern disruption email with a Y you why now this is a very, very useful sales strategy because again, it's all about personalization, It's tying that individuals job role and something that's happening in that company's life cycle to what you're selling. So they know that it's not automated, they know that it's not bullshit, They know that you've done your research. So when you send that, why you why now email? It's very with and then you can of course include all the other components. So you want to have like a strong see to our call to action in that email as well. It sort of checks the boxes as to what a decision maker would like to respond to. That answers all their questions without them even having to reach out to your jump on a call. Right? So it makes sense. So anyway, so that's so that's sort of like the to the first to touch points in a sequence or campaign across email or linked in of course then you want to, you know, call them. I'm not going to do too much into this because each different component can have a whole bunch of strategies and tactics behind it. But when you're doing this type of outreach, then you want to bring it back to your social profile, your presence, your brand and...

...what you're doing with your brand, especially when you're selling on linkedin, you are building out your linked in profile, like a web page. What I mean by that is you have a header that shows a picture of what you do or what your company does. You have your value, proper unique selling proposition, telling people exactly what you do and that little that little box that gives you a few characters to to speak about what you know what your job title is, put a little bit more in so people know what you're doing. And then as you go down your profile you can actually put some copy, put some text in that we'll have a call to action asking people to reach out to you for this solution or that solution or this product or that product. And then you're also aligning that messaging that you are basically building your linked in profile around with the content that you're putting out. So the content you're putting out is answering questions that remember that I. C. P. And the buyer persona that we first identify that we're doing our cold outbound to would be asking. So now you have your outbound aligning with your social media profile on linkedin. So you have this outbound machine that is leading people to look at your linkedin that your Lincoln is now identified you as an authority and you know, this particular topic area or this particular industry and it's the linkedin profile is now optimized in a way that it will actually convert and act is almost like an inbound tool as well. So Yeah, never mind a tactic. You just finished, you put like a 10 of them together in this dude. I went out like a million miles a minute. So I really hope this is like I try, this is I'm actually doing a webinar on this in a couple weeks with another with another pure and it's like a two hour webinar. And I just tried to sites everything I'm talking about because it's possible. Mind this might go up, this might go up after the webinar. So we'll link to the Lebanon when we get this up if it's something you can share because that that young people that are interested. Well look, when I walk it through that, does that make sense? Is their points that need clarification...

...because I can go into details. I just want to make sure from a uh from a high level it does, let's let's leave a little meat on the bone for the webinar sounds good. Sounds like we're in the, we're in the, the, the fast zone of of the podcast, The quick fire questions if you will. So what's a key position you're hiring for? I'm always hiring for sales. And the reason why I say that is because I will always hire anybody for a sales position. If they show that they're tenacious, they have grit and they're curious and they just, it doesn't matter because I found incredible sales. People that don't come from sales roles as long as they have the right personality trait. Excuse me, Sales can be taught, I'm a firm believer that sales can be taught if you have the right personality, love it. And then who do you follow for, who inspires you from a content side? Yeah. So for marketing, it's Seth Godin, I think he's an incredible marketer. Um, and for sales, a lot of people will, this will resonate with a lot of people marco bearish from hot spot. Like he's, you know, he's kind of the B. O. G in terms of demand jin inbound. And I just to listen to him speak and study how he thinks and how he sort of built this inbound as opposed to outbound rajan machine. It's very, it's very impressive. Yeah, I love that. He's been mentioned a couple times. So the Seth Godin, who's, who's the goat in so many ways. All right, So who else who are the kind of like colleagues, our up and comers if you will, who are doing some cool stuff that we should know about? Yeah, so I'm again big fan of social selling and I think that if you want to learn how to do social properly, don't look at businesses, look at individuals that are killing it and what I mean by that, is there somebody that's great on twitter instagram linkedin youtube and study from them. Study their examples Anyways, the people that I follow, so at m Kobach or Matthew Kobach on twitter, he does a great job of community building on twitter. Justin, Welch on linkedin is killing it on linkedin, he has a great following any and it's just they know...

...how to use the platform properly. So if you want to learn how to use twitter well for business, go to go to this person, you want to use linkedin look and study for example Justin and then on instagram, the only person that I've ever seen really do instagram well for B two B is at the Cristo or Cristo. He's awesome at instagram for me to be cool. Well, I just had Justin on the pod and really learned a lot from him and what he's, what he's up to. All right, well look, all this stuff is cool and all, but it doesn't feed us. I want to know where I should eat. All right. So the best, the best place that I've ever eaten that right now, I'm in Toronto Canada, but I was basically born and raised in Ottawa and Ottawa has an incredible Middle Eastern Lebanese population. They have the best warmest in the world, like literally the world and I will debate anybody in the world on that. Um, I've never seen a better, I've been overseas. I've been everywhere in the states. They don't have better Middle Eastern food or storm. So if you ever go to Ottawa Canada go to Shawarma Palace. They have three franchise locations, all family operated and it's the best and food delivery life. No, I love it. I love it man. Well scott, this is great. We left a little bit of a bone for part two or for your webinar upcoming. Cool. Thank you so much for joining. So great to have you. My pleasure man. Thanks a lot for having me. All right, that is our show. Thank you so much. Sorry. I went a little long today. If you love the show, please write a review in the apple podcast or Spotify. Have sent it to some friends, make sure to hit that. Subscribe on reminder. This episode was brought to you by quarter past quarter path is the first radically transparent and to end compensation solution from sales reps to finance, get started for free at quarterback dot com slash revenue dash collective. I had a lot of fun. Hope you did too. Now go crush your numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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