The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 9 months ago

Ep 46: Persistence Can Bag You an 8-figure Deal with Jason Ring

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this edition of "Is this a good time?", Brandon talks shop with Jason Ring, Global Head of Inside Sales at Global Shares.

Hello, everyone. And welcome back tothe revenue collected podcast. I am your host friend and Barton and you arelistening to Is this a good time to show where I asked revenue collectivemembers from really basic questions, and they have incredible answers? In ashort 15 minute conversation, we're on Tuesdays and Thursdays each week. Sohit the subscribe button so you don't miss an opportunity to learn frommembers of the RC who may end up being your boss one day today. Our guest isJason Ring, global head of sales for emerging companies. This is for globalshares out of County Cork, Ireland, and we get to hear about how persistencecan lead to an eight figure sale before we get into the questions. I wanted totell you a little bit about this one sponsor six cents six cents. The numberone account engagement platform helps you identify accounts that air inmarket for your solution. Prioritize your efforts, engage buyers the rightway with highly relevant messaging and measure what actually matters. With sixcents platform, you're able to get into more deals, improvement rates, increaseoverall pipeline and optimize budget spent toe. Learn Mawr, visit six centsdot com slash revenue Collective. Alright, let's do this. Episode sevenIs this a good time? Alright, so great to have Jason ring here. Jason is theglobal head of sales of emerging companies at global shares based out ofCounty Cork in Ireland. And he's also the co founder of the Irish chapter ofthe Revenue Collective. Jason, thank you for being with us, Brandon. It ismy pleasure. Nice. Nice to see you. Nice to hear you. Good. Good. I Iappreciate the setting up the timing of this a little later in the afternoonfor you, But look, as we do here, we wanna, you know, all meat. No, feller,Let's jump right in. So give us a sense of you know, your current role. And howdid you get here? Yeah, so probably ah, long rounded story of probably a lot ofdata podcast listeners. It was an unconventional way to get into sales,first of all, so I probably got into...

...sales when I was 15. 16. My first everjob was selling characters. Believe it or not. Uh, yeah. So selling charactersto disgruntled people, that or for, you know, fighting over maybe a your or atthe time was a pound, which is a different currency you wouldn'tunderstand. But the Irish, the Irish listeners would understand what a pointis. Right. So there you go. Things bring a bit of localization to it. Butyes. So I've got 33 different degrees. I've got a physiotherapy degree asked.You panic medicine. Degree on. I've got a business and accounting degree. Andi,I didn't come from the, you know, it was most affluent of families inrelation to that. So I had to find a way to fund myself through college. Ifell into sales by an indirect way of trying to find myself through college.So I worked Monday to Friday on. Then I done. I was a whole bunch of it wasliterally night and weekends to get myself through college. And what Ifound by pure accident was that I kind of had a knack for talking to people,anyone within the revenue collective or anyone that knows me. I'm a talker.It's probably my biggest strength of my biggest weaknesses. You'll find outhere, um, but but I kind of had a knack for it. I was able to build reportwhere people quite easily I was able to bunks off people quite well. And, youknow, that's really important in sales and in in life in general, just thio,you know, especially like even if you look at a pandemic just networking. Soyes, So I kind of grew kind of went, you know, true other roles. I donesales development rep work The companies like e M C. I worked infireeye Silence Force Point. So I've worked for a really big high growth SAScyber security companies. If you look at, I need them. They've all kind ofgone either being acquired organ I p o r have kinda hit that unicorn status on.That's kind of, you know, all that experience of doing the different jobsand working the way open. Learning everything from characters thio servicesecurity trends at the board level over the last 15 years, gonna got Meteo therole of force point and from force point to the global chairs. Andi, Yes.Oh, my role here is we've built a new...

...side of the business that helpsstartups globally. So this is anything from their equity their share plans,their cap table management, how to take on investment. Ah, lot of dash. As youcan imagine, Brandon is involving the investors, the VCs, the employees,shareholders, the law firms. So a lot of my day is spent talking to all thosedifferent people either together or a different segments, talking to highgrowth companies that are, you know, maybe not under radar today. You know,we were having a joke off laying just about certain things inthe e investmentof spare at the moment, so we won't mention any names, but yeah, so that'sthat's kind of a very quick whistle stop tour, how we got here, a bit of anunconventional approach, But I think that's what everyone says and say,Listen, you don't you're not part of the sales person s or some are, but youfind it unconventionally perhaps, Um, I love that, I mean, in dealing with myown, you know, experiences with startups and, you know, dealing withcap table and all the different components of it. And it's essentiallya distraction. You want to focus on working on your business and and nothave to focus on other stuff. So good to have companies like yours that exist.Well, look, you talked a little bit about some of the hard work that youwent through to get to where you are work, you know, working while going tocollege and working full time. I had that experience myself. So shout out tothat. You know what builds character? You know? No, no handouts. But sothat's a little bit of the hard work. Give me example of luck and hard workotherwise that have gotten me to where you are, you know, because it's notjust about hard work. Yeah, like I think, Like, you know, everyone knowsthe analogy of you can, uh, you work smart, Not hard. And you kind ofobviously make sure that you understand where your time is Well spent. I thinkover the years, what I've kind of taken on board is Thio fail fast and move onand not dwell on the past. Like I think sales is a very funny industry where,you know, you have to accept that the present and how you present the digittime you're gonna lose or fail. That's...

...just the law of averages. Like you know,you know, if you compare this to like a doctor, for example, I don't thinktaken going with the same kind of odds and accept their job, right, Becausetheir job is Thio. Make sure the metrics very high or job in sales is toaccept that you know, you're gonna lose. You're gonna lose for a whole bunch ofreasons. Andi, I think what I've figured out over the years is obviouslyThio reduce my my my kind of closed last percentage. Obviously, I'mincrease my win percentage, but really to where the hunt and focus. Because,you know, like certain jobs that I've gone into over the years I've beengiven access Thio linked in on a laptop and told, Create America's Andi, youknow, if I don't know how toe segment in America, or understand how to reallymake use of the excellent always I have every day or where my 80 20 rule isgonna come in, then I'm just gonna kind of go hell for leather, and I'm notreally going to make a dent in anywhere. So I think over the years, that'sreally what I've kind of holding on is it's all about preparation is all aboutunderstanding American segment, understanding your customer'sunderstanding. They're buying journey on. Obviously, the hard work is kind ofgiven. I think everyone in sales like if you don't work hard and you knowit's a given I don't think you're destined for. But I think, really, it'sthat the people the people think that I've worked on over the years, I don'tknow if it's an Irish thing, you know, I don't think it is. But yeah, it'sdefinitely just having that kind of laser focus I don't understand and kindof where you wanna go with your business. When you went and kind ofmade a market out of nothing, you had to have some steps there that just gotlucky. You caught it. Somebody like uh, yeah, Look, if I give you one exampleand I kind of get asked, you know, tell me about the time you want to deliver.And I always think back Thio it was an American company, right? Literally. Myjob in one of the companies was to build the Irish in UK, America on itwas Social Security. It was a new trend is all about, like zero day threatskind of like an evangelist on. I was competing against all of the big existin cyber security companies that had market reputation that had existed.Customer did everything. I had a laptop...

...pond linked in Andi. I just kind ofstarted getting out there talking to people, trying to get the message off.What you know, What are the new threats that are coming out there attachingthat to business challenge? Like obviously, we all sell products andservices, but the customer has a business challenge. So I always try torelate everything I was doing to a business challenge on not my businesschallenge but the customers business challenge. So anyway, long story short,I was doing that. I got some really good responses back. I spoke to agentleman he was to see so often e commerce company in the UK on. He waslike, Look, you know, it's interesting. We're interesting, you know this area.But I'm not the decision maker. It's a guy in the U. S. Do you need to speakto? So I'm automatically thinking out here, Okay, Now I have to go outside ofmy territory. What do I do like do I do it? Or do I not do it? And I was like,Well, you know, look, this account is in the UK, right? This guy is in the UK.He's told me to go to speak to someone else. If you get the name of him, he'lldo it. So gave me the name on. I reached out to go in the US to go in uswas an ex military man. He was in the army for 35 years. He was no securityadviser of a $60 billion company on. Yeah. Yeah. So this was a subsidiary of,ah, massive company. And I was just thinking like, Okay, this is the kindof company that we definitely need to be talking to. Forget the subsidiary on.I was checking the CRM and I was frantically looking going, I hope Idon't see the name, you know, blah, blah, blah. You know that it sells repsat the time. So anyway, long story short had an engagement, tried to gofor about three months, and he came back to me one day and he said, You'veannoyed me so much that you deserve a call. Eso we got on the car with theguy Guy was based out of Connecticut on. He absolutely hated salespeople. Heopened it up by gone. I hate sales people. I don't like you on. I was like,You know what I could live with that I'm okay. Like, let's have a bit ofback and forth this on. It just struck up a really good conversation. Goodrelationship, Onda. You know, e supposed fast forward. Three yearslater, that company spent about $12 million with the company. They over theover over three years, like, you know,...

...like, literally six months in. Theybought nearly every product we have every service we had. They bought itfrom a guy that was on the phone in a car wreck office. Like I had no rightto talk the echo. Technically, there was definitely friction at certainstages down the lane. But again, I think that there was no America there.It was a completely new company on. What do you do? Do you not hunt forthat $60 billion company because of you? You know, you could say you had noright to be there, but yet you sold them $12 million with the product. Thatseems to mean that you did have a right to be there. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And andso that's pretty great. Funny, just just to round that off to talk abouthow funny it waas like at one stage the CEO of our company and the CEO of theircompany. We're on a call talking about how they do their banking every week.We were in a board meeting with, like, their legal counsel we're talking about,like board level cyber threats and all that. And obviously online banking wasa big area on one says to the other. I don't do online banking, and the otherguy says, I don't even have a bank account on. We were, like just acombined wealth care probably like x billion dollars on, like it's just sucha surreal conversation. But it was amazing, and it would have taught me atthe time. And, you know, this is going back, maybe 78 years on. Do it taughtme at the time that, like, you know, you get what you put into it, right,And if you do the right thing and you haunting to replace things will happen.It kind of went what I said earlier, but you have to know where to hunt.Like the guy that I reached out to the first time. It wasn't by chance thathappened to be a subsidiary of another company, that he was a c so that wasorchestrated. The fact that he replayed and like, things the way it went, theway it it it There's probably an element of luck in that. In some,regarding shorter is Oh, my gosh. Of course there is it when it when itdoesn't, you know, it doesn't all come just from the hard work. Well, look, uh,we kind of had a couple in their but give us, you know, top of mine. What isa tactic that people that are listening to this can go and take away and usethemselves? That, I mean, certainly sounds like the preparation that goesinto going through a cold call or, you...

...know, email sequence or something. Weall know that stuff, but give us something we don't know the tactic.Yeah, I think I think the big thing for me, like I think back two years ago,There was a term that I learned when it was actually back in the M. C years ago.We went through some really great training on the training was forcedmanagement. They don't You ever heard of it? You know, commander Message, man,I said on I always remember one thing in which was negative, quantifiableconsequences, Which was all about the cost for the customer of doing nothingversus the cost of your solution, Andi, like an an example would be, You know,if you don't buy this product. What? What's the negative consequence that?Okay, so I'm selling Social Security products. If you don't, boy, what's theconsequence? You could get bridged. Okay, that breach would have brandreputation damage. Okay, what would that cost you? Let's say a cost you amillion dollars under trying to figure out there. Okay, well, if you didn'thave to spend that million dollars in repairing your brand or defines whatwould you spend that on all? I would have spent it on opening a new office.OK? How many people would you have hired? I probably have hired 10 reps.How much would they have been carrying from a quarter point of view, you know,And then you build this kind of like, look at the opportunity over hereversus I'm asking for 50 grand. You, the opportunity that you don't dosomething is X million. So that's one thing Theater, theater, big thing thatstands out for me is, and I spoke earlier about you, about which is theimportance of tying it back to the customer's business. I've seen so manycall scripts, and so I guess I get so many messages where they don'tunderstand the business that I work in or what my job is, you know, like atall. And when you're trying to sell me that they're going to solve all myproblems and they don't relate to my problems like it's on the website isnot. My profile might look at my role, and responsibilities are linked in like,you know, if you can try it back. Thio. What my challenges in a sales job. Orif I'm in HR or I t, you'll sell your product quick or your service. Yourelate to the people a lot more. You take a little bit more time than justhitting the auto dialer to the next...

...person on a hate scripts. I absolutelyhate scripts. Me to Totally. I know it's a kind of taboo thing, but just tosay that there's reps out there that probably gonna work for us. And youhate script, so I don't need the Oh, yeah, You need this now until youfigure it out. Yeah, Well, look, you know, we'll kind of wind this down. Whoare some of the people that you, you know, kind of follow and kind of, youknow, like their content. And, you know, you talk a little bit about forcemanagement there. Yeah. So I I am begin toe obviously following a lot ofdifferent people in relation Thio online training stuff. But I think atthe moment, like if you're not following the lakes, you know, youryour your Morgan Ingrams, and you're just some shells and all these kind ofguys online. You're you're missing a trick. Like obviously these guys airdoing phenomenal work in relation to just like online networking and how toe,you know, do the right pitch. Can I actually just say like, some of thebest content I find online at the moment is from STRS of companies. Ihave to say the level off just like complexity of customization and effortthey're goingto is phenomenal. There was, ah, girl online the other day. Sheworks for ah ah crm integration company. Andi. I think she's got, like, 15 toesand followers. Her name is Casey at the moment, but, like I actually took whatshe had spoken about online on shared my str team. And I said, This is whatyou need to aspire to because she's doing all the right things. It's not,isn't that great? Like, you know, that like sales development reps you canactually like like we don't know everything so taken at on, you know, soendless amount for her name. You got a surface that name for me. We're goingto send it out to the Yeah, I definitely will. Definitely. We couldgive our shots, Lord. Anyway, there's Lord just hashtag If your str is onLinkedIn, you'll find a lot of them. Yeah, you know what are you hiring foranything right now? Any jobs that you need? Yes. We were always going where Iwas expanding. So inside sales reps sales government reps were opening upfor a few other roads around a customer...

...success and renew ALS and even samefinancial analysts as well. But yeah, like the overall companies grownastronomically, we hired about 100 50 people through the pandemic, so checkout the website global dot com. Uh, get awesome. And then, lastly, I'm arestaurant person growing up like world as well. You got to give me a plate.What's your secret place? That we should go eat anywhere in the world?Doesn't have to be. But well, I think I had a place for myself. For my wife.It's our favorite places called Cafe Mexicana. So, like it's in Ireland.Isn't car your kind of thinking? Well, the place you're giving me is a Mexicanrestaurant in Ireland. Well, that could be with strange, but this is actuallyran boy Mexican people. It's like an authentic restaurant. It's a lovelylittle place. The food is amazing service. Amazing. So if you're ever inin Cork and you're looking for a place to go, I definitely recommend thatplace. Anyway, I cannot wait to get out there and visit. I love it, man. Well,Jason, thank you so much. so awesome to chat with you and hear your story. Um,really psyched to kind of follow along in your career. And your success, man.Thank you. Appreciate it. My pleasure. Thank you. That's our show. Thank youso much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in theApple podcast Spotify app. This really helped us out and send its of somefriends who might be interested in hearing about Jason's conversation. Areminder this episode was brought to you by six cents. Powered by AI andPredictive Analytics. Six cents helps you to unite your entire revenue teamwith a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue growth. I had fun.I hope you did too. Now go crush your numbers.

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