The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 2 months ago

Ep 112: Never Burn a Bridge w/ Nicole Hutzul

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 112: Never Burn a Bridge w/ Nicole Hutzul

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton. 

Hello everyone and welcome back to thepavilion podcast. This is episode 50. What quick reminder programming note Ifyou have somebody who you think would be great to be on my version of thePavilion podcast. Is this a good time? Shoot me a note. Would love a D. M andslack. You all know how to get me. Brandon Barton, That's fine. I wouldlove to hear from you if you wanted to nominate somebody. I have people, but Iwant to also throw it out for those that want to raise their hands. Wouldlove to see if, you know, we'll get some interesting people that way thatare outside of who I've been normally thinking. So anyway, back to the, tothe regular programming. This is is this a good time. And this is a showwhere I asked a million members, basic questions. They have great answers.It's a lot of fun as you probably know. We're out on Tuesdays and Thursdays.Hit subscribe. Don't miss a episode today. Our guest is Nicole Hutzell.She's the VP of enterprise sales in Canada for you next. And we talk aboutthe power of your former colleagues and why never to burn a bridge. Prettyawesome conversation. This episode was brought to buy drift. More than 50,000businesses use drift to grow revenue and increase customer lifetime valuefaster drift, helps their customers align sales and marketing on a singleplatform to deliver a unified customer experience where people are free tohave a conversation with businesses at any time on their terms, learn more atdrift dot com. Alright, let's do this episode 50. Is this a good time? Allright, so happy to have Nicole Hutzell with us. She is the regional vicepresident of enterprise sales in Canada for you next somewhat new new marketfor yet. So, I'm excited to talk about that. Nicole. So great to have you onthe pod. Nice to be here. Thank you for having me. Well look, we as we do onthe Pavilion podcast here, I'll meet no filler. Just jumping right in. Tell usabout your current role and then also you know how you got here? Well, thepaths are getting here. That's a great...

...question. So I'm currently runningenterprise sales for you next in Canada. Which funnily enough was recentlyidentified as a country by my north american based or new york basedbusiness. It was managed through the Northeast in the U. S. For a while andI laugh about it because we actually have really large customers here inCanada customers like Rogers and Bell and Canada goose roots, tim Hortonskind of a who's who of Canadian clients. So I've been agitating for a while thatwe're a country. I received this promotion. However, after successfullymanaging a region in the US for yes for the last two plus years. So it wasdefinitely a long time in coming and my journey has been one of reallynetworking and working with and for and employing former colleagues. So how Igot here to you next is through two former colleagues at Adobe. One of themI had also worked with an exact target and then Salesforce and I have beenactively pursuing former employees from companies ranging from Adobe in anexact target sales force to a recent stint I did at a company that wasacquired by S. A. P. Called a Marcis. I now have about eight former colleaguesworking here with me at next interesting. So you so you bring themover but it sounds like you also have somewhat of a job strategy of seekingout former colleagues to find how do they like what they're doing in thecompanies that they're at and going to those places? Is that gonna have thatright as well? It's kind of like both sides of it. Yeah, I think it goes backto that adage, it's not what, you know, it's who, you know, I think if you keepyour network close, even if you move on or they move on, identifying strengthsand recognizing who could be successful in a, in a different or new role andthen taking that person and giving them that opportunity helps you build a baseor foundation of strong people at any...

...company you work at. And plus there's alittle bit of shared experience so you can say, well let's do this like we didthat thing and so forth. Totally true. I'm curious just pulling on this alittle bit further for most of the folks that either you, let's just takethe, let's take the group that you hired and brought over. Were you closewith them in the other companies or did you respect what they did from afar ora mix of boat? That's a really good question. And most of the individualswho I have brought over at least two yes have worked for me as my formeremployees. And the interesting thing is part of what I focus on when I amcoaching or growing employees is strength and so identifying theirstrengths helps me be able to identify whether or not they would fit into arole at the next company. And in fact, the gentleman who supports my team froma solutions consultant perspective was a seller for me at two separatecompanies, but had spoken about his career path and his desire to learn andbe a more technical resource sales and he had that opportunity here due to my,my engagement on it. Yeah, I mean you saw a role and you said, you know what,even though hey, everyone next, this person doesn't have this inexperienced,but they're going to be perfect. So, so you know, so listen to me and I'll, andyou know, obviously there's a little bit of risk on your side for that,right? Uh, you know, look, you may be right, but it's funny because that riskcomes with that loyalty, right? Because that person knows you're taking therisk and they say, even if this isn't all that I, I wanted out of a role,maybe I was looking over the fence, seeing a greener field here, I'm stillgonna kick ass at it because Nicole put her word out there for me. I love thatas a strategy. Well, I think that and interesting to talk about meetingpeople and so forth because there's so...

...much of kind of good luck that goesinto that. But I think that hard work and good luck both contribute togetting people where they are. Give me a story of either one that that justkind of was pivotal in getting you to to the place you are today. So I lovehow you you brought that up because I always use that cliche, which is youknow, luck comes to those who work the hardest. And I noted, I I really havefocused on capitalizing on my strengths as well as the strength of the peoplethat I work with. So when I I look at how I I've gotten lucky per se. It'sreally based on peer collaboration and those identification of um personal andthen strengths on the other side of the fence. So a good example of this is Iknow my strengths are people leadership, strategic selling sales coachingtraining, quite articulate, so I do a lot of public speaking etcetera. ButI'm terrible at math and math is really important to uh understanding of PMLdoing ri calculations, business value assessments and what I look for arepeople who have those strengths and then can accommodate or really balanceout and create a whole within a group. So when I hire, when I engage, when Ipure collaborate, I look for people who fill in the gaps that I have. And thenwhen I put them together in teams, I look to find complementary strengths aswell. And I think that helps the luck by doing the heavy lifting or the hardwork at the beginning. I also would say this comes with the hard work question.I believe your team and your customers and your prospects should never walkinto an empty room. So I do, like I say...

...this to my two. I don't use the autoresponders. I'm not asking that anybody else doesn't, but I make sure that Irespond to every communication that is relevant with a hey, I'm on vacation,I'm doing this, I'm doing that. I'll get back to you. But I always put ananswer and responsiveness or engagement to any engagement in any outboundengagement. That's a hell of a lot of hard work it is, but people don't wantan immediate answer necessarily what they want to have as somebodyacknowledge that they have asked that question or that they've reached out orthat they're there Anything, an acknowledgement gets you 80% of the waythere. And then the last thing I would say is we were talking about theengagement with my former employees becoming current employees. I reallyfocus on not burning bridges and I think that makes you luckier becausepeople don't have a, you don't have a target on your back. So I really workhard to carry myself in a way in and out of every engagement from aprofessional perspective and a personal perspective where there's no bridgesberg, I love that. I feel like I've done a little scorched earth in thepast and uh it's always short term thinking as opposed to long termthinking. So I'm a big fan of trying to end everything as as strong as if itwas, you know, day one of starting it. Well, you know, it seems like I alreadygave us one. Maybe this tactic is not, doesn't apply to everyone to answer allthe emails. Even on vacation, it does not apply to me by the way, just forthose listening, you will see an auto responder up there because I need that,that, that time for me. But give us a tactic would give us something that youthink from a sales or marketing perspective that people can put intotheir daily practice. So this isn't a daily practice or you might end up witha bad liver. But one of the things that I did when I was an individualcontributor and I tend to do this with my teams even now is I do fear 30blitzes. So I ask everybody who does...

...drink to pour drink around 33 30 onfriday afternoons and pick up the phone, call customers called prospects, callagencies called partners, pick up the phone and say, look, I'm having a drinkright now. I was thinking of you, I just wanted to see where your businesswas that. Do you have a few minutes to chat? Why don't you pour yourself adrink as well? And what I found is having a drink in your hand and I'm notadvocating alcoholism because I don't drink that much, but having a drink inyour hand, having a few sips of that Changes your demeanor. It opens up yourand loosens you up as you are talking with people and it gives you somethingto talk about. Look, we're doing a happy hour blitz right now or beer 30blitz or whatever your regional way of describing your drinking in theafternoon is uh spirit, whatever wine mom. And really it has been sosuccessful because a lot of times people don't have meetings at that time,so you can actually get him on the phone. It humanizes how your engagementis and it doesn't have to be come on strong. Is this called, are you callingmaybe people that you have had former contact with or this is cold, cold,warm, anything public. I I this is this is good. This is dangerous folks fromBeit listening. We are not doing this. No, I like it. I like it. It's anoutside. Especially in the summer, right? Like uh whole like second halfof the, you know, we're sitting here in a beautiful, I hope it's a beautiful intoronto beautiful friday. Like you know people my drink of choice is captainand diet a little bit of uh you know captain morgan and a little bit of acaffeine and and a couple hours of picking up the phone and I even do iteven as a people leader, I try to do it with my team that I love that. So areyou looking for any new people to be...

...joining this, this happy hour? Whoyou're hiring right now? So that's a great, great question. We actually arelooking for an additional seller in the G. T. A. Enterprise seller to work withenterprise level accounts and we define an enterprise account as 500 million ormore in terms of annual revenue. And then I'm looking for somebody bilingualin Quebec. We're also hiring a solutions consultant. Somebody who'scustomer facing has experienced doing sort of solution consulting in demos.Doesn't have to be hypertechnical. Really, we can teach the technology,it's really about the capability of condensing technical information intoconsumable solutions. And then we're also looking for somebody new in theircareer BDR to be calling into our Canadian market as well where peoplesit in Toronto or no. so right now we uh, we don't have an office, so thiswould be a remote role. Okay, cool, cool. Love that bilingual BDR probablyis better than not. Yeah, you know, I, I bilingual be great, but I'm not, Ithink english speaking is fine if we need to, I I just want somebody in theQuebec market who's bilingual so that we can cover, cover our bases. They'retotally got that. Alright, well look, give us some shout outs who are somepeople that you kind of follow their content and appreciate kind of thethings that, that they contribute to your thinking, oh my God, if youhaven't heard of Todd Caponi, he is amazing. He wrote a book called thetransparency sale and from what I understand, he's writing one for salesmanagers as well. I was fortunate enough to be enabled by him when I wasback at exact target. He is one of the most, he did a number of podcasts orpresentations. I say webinars through the sales assembly that you canprobably still get about selling into...

...uncertain times during the covid. He isdynamic his book, the transparency cell is transformative. It goes against thegrain of what we envision sellers to be aggressive, lying, cheating, backbiting. It's the exact opposite. And he has a really good blog. It's called thetransparency cell. It's a so he is somebody who if you are looking for thekinder, gentler, warmer way of selling. He's the man, I love it. I love it.That, that sounds like a great person to follow. I'm gonna I'm just lookingup his book now, maybe once already on the way to the house, love it and thenlast but not least. It is frankly, my, my most important question, where arewe eating? What's a spot? Give me a spot that we can go eat. Let's say it has to be north of theborder. Gotta support up in Canada. They've had a hard time with Covid. Ilove that question because I had to think about it a lot because when Itraveled to the U. S. You know, we take clients out to fancy fancy restaurants.And you know, my first candidly, my first response was going to be like, wehave momofuku ko up here in Toronto and things like I'm thinking about, knowwhat am I craving right now? And up in Montreal, there's a restaurant rightoutside of your Montreal called Lavinia Hall. And they do local Canadian food.It's seasonal, it's amazing. And I haven't been there obviously sinceoctober of 2019 because it's uh you know, because 2020 hit and we haven'tbeen outside of the borders, but it is our go to place. It's, you know,obviously it's, it's not one of the fancy, fancy ones. It's really justreal genuine Canadian food. And the ambience is as Canadian. They have anamazing poutine. They have, you know, fresh, if you like game while game,they, you know, they pushed a little bit as well. So it's, it's just amazing.I love it sounds delicious. I'll add it...

...to the the 400,000 calories that I needto put in my body when I go to Montreal. Uh love it. Well, Nicole so great tomeet and hear your story. I I love so many little parts of it, including justkind of uh you know, there's a lesson here to everybody, be nice to yourcolleagues, they're gonna hire you in the future or you're gonna be hiringthem. It's either way so love it. Nicole. Best of luck with everything.Looking forward to keeping in touch. Thank you so much. All right, that isour show. Thank you so much for listening. Can't believe we got to 50.Going to get to 100 before the end of the year. It's pretty fun if you lovethe show. Great review in the Apple podcasts or Spotify have send it tofriends, do all the stuff reminder. This episode is brought to you by drift.The new way businesses by from businesses. You can learn more and getthe conversation started at drift dot com. I had fun. Hope you did too. Nowgo crush your numbers. Mhm.

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