The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 3 months ago

Ep 120: Motherhood, Startups, and Marketing w/ Leigh Chesley

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 120: Motherhood, Startups, and Marketing w/ Leigh Chesley

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to thePavilion podcast. I am your host, Brandon Barton you're listening to. Isthis a good time, the Shore? I asked Pavilion members some really greatquestions. They have answers. It's a lot of fun. Especially today. We reallyshows Tuesdays and Thursdays and if you had subscribed, I promised to deliveryour new episodes every single week today. Our guest is lee Cheslea. She isamazing human being. We talked a lot about motherhood marketing and startupsand just work like balance stuff, really great stuff. This episode wasbrought to buy drift. More than 50,000 businesses use drift to grow revenueand increased customer lifetime value faster drift, helps their customersonline sales and marketing on a single platform to deliver a unified customerexperience. Where people are free to have a conversation with the businessat any time on their terms, learn more at drift dot com. Alright, let's dothis episode 55 double nickel. Is this a good time? Alright, I'm so happy tohave lee Chesley with us. She's the VP...

...of marketing at Longbow advantage outof the northern Atlanta area. So great to have you on the pod. Thanks. Yeah, Iappreciate you having me. It's great to be here. Great. Well look, I'll meet nofellow. We just jump right in with the questions, tell us about your currentrole and then the path you took to get here. Yeah, absolutely. So as youmentioned, I'm currently VP of marketing at Longwood Advantage. Wehelp distribution teams continuously improve with unified real timevisibility into warehouse operations through our revis platform. We alsoprovide expert in the end supply chain technology implementations andconsulting. So yeah, so it's a lot and supply chain is definitely, definitelyhot right now. So we've had a really exciting last couple of years gettingto help folks who really need it. And in terms of my path here, I have forthe most apartment in the start up, high growth to be tex ass world, Yeah,there's a big, big sector of that here...

...in Atlanta. So um have been involved inthat and I've let and grown marketing teams and those organizations and thenI made a brief stop at Manhattan Associates, which is much largerorganization where my team owned pipeline marketing across all of theproducts, which led me into the supply chain world. So kind of, I like the waythat I'm getting to use my supply chain knowledge along with my startupexperience and the role that I'm in right now and you're leaving out myfavorite part of your career, which is perhaps the earlier days you were inrestaurants, you were you were in restaurants just like me, so, and thenyou also worked for NPR and I imagine that was for the hospitality side ofthings, is that right? I did actually, So when I was in college I was managingrestaurants and bartending, kind of putting myself through school that way.And then, yep, and then thankfully that led me to the opportunity in cr becausethey said, well you you've been in the industry that our customers are in, soI had an opportunity to go there which...

...really got me into the VTB Tech space.So you're right, it's a really important, important step that I leftout there. No, it's not. I mean, I just, I just bring it up because I'm arestaurant person, I run a restaurant tech company and we love our friends atNCR So it's it's very cool and they're one of the companies whose kind of amainstay of the Atlanta area. When it comes to be, to be, you know, they'vebeen around for forever obviously, so very cool. So, look, I mean in order toget where you are today, through all these roles, I'm sure there werestrokes of luck as well as tons of hard work, love a story from either side ofthat. Whether luck or hard work just go into either one or both. Yeah, I'veprobably got both. Well, I'll start with hard work. So hard work I think issomething that you can't overlook. I was actually, when I graduated fromcollege, I was an unmarried mom, my son was two when I graduated and so for me,I knew that hard work wasn't optional,...

...so it was something that I just saw asthe most certain path to security and success for my family. Um, and so, youknow, I would be remiss, not to say I've had had a fantastic support teamthat helped me finish school and you know, definitely always encouraged meto go for my dreams and take the next hard job and work my butt off and thosesorts of things. And you know, even now, you know, my husband's my biggestcheerleader, but I think that you can't, I don't know that hard work is a pointin time type thing. I think it's something that is a mindset that needsto continuously build. And I will even say to for the, for the women listeningor for the parents listening. I mean, I think it's important that your kids seeyou work hard. Yeah, I I totally agree with this. I mean, people listen to popand I have two kids and their young and I don't sleep a lot. But um, I justhave to ask you because as a single mom, as a woman, you're, you know, let's sayyou're just entering the workforce, you...

...must have faced so much crap. Like Isee what the women in my life who have Children and go through short maternityleaves and then, you know, hard times and like your your life changes in away that a lot of companies don't adjust for and maybe today we'restarting to get towards that, especially in the world of startupculture. But like anything come to mind is these like challenges that peoplesay, oh, well you need to travel this day or that day or something like, wellI can't, you know, like I don't have coverage for that with my child, youknow? Right. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, so I took six weeks off with myyoungest who's now almost 15, so things have definitely changed a good bit. Iwas fortunate to take about four months off with my my youngest who's almostthree, so I definitely think that's been changing. I think for me thetravel wasn't as hard and maybe it was just my situation where I could, Icould figure out, you know, you can kind of send the kids to stay withgrandma or whatever, you know, like you...

...sure that out, it was the, we need youto be in from 7 to 6 kind of thing or 7 to 7 in the start up world where it'slike the expectation was just day to day and day in and day out that youwere available. And so that was hard. I think the what we're seeing shift andespecially coming out of the pandemic is it's accepted now that your livesare intertwined. I think work life balance is, that's not even probablythe right word. It's just I have calls now where and I try to encourage bookson my team, my kids are around, they'll come say hi, we get them on the call.And I think from my perspective, having kind of been through some of thoseharder situation, I mean I had a man tell me one time that I needed a wifeto help help me take care of my kids. So having been through some of thosesituations, I try to set the example that you should bring your whole selfto work and we're all better as a team if we understand everything that folkshave going on in their lives. So I do...

...see the shift and I'm trying to helplead that ship to any like little tidbit of advice that you might offerto any young women coming up course struggling with, let's say or just anyadvice to the idea of how do you maintain home life as well as have yourcareer? Is there anything that you might want to, you know, share as anexpert? Clearly an expert in this that is generous, but I appreciate it. Um,one find the right company, find the right leader. Don't feel like anyopportunity is the last opportunity opportunity you'll get to do something.So wait till you get a good fit and go for that. And then to, I mean, I thinkthe notion that you have balanced or that you're doing it all or that you'redoing everything well is sometimes overstated. You know, I think all of usare just doing the best that we can hopefully, and so sharing with peoplethat hey, I'm especially this last year, a year ago I had women in my networkwho we would get on calls and just say...

I am really struggling with figuringout how to manage a pandemic and kids and work. And let's talk about that.And I think opening up those conversations is really helpful even ifit's just having a network. So, you know, you're not alone. Yeah, Yeah. Ilove that. That's great. Um, I mean I, I, well, my opinion doesn't matter here.I just, I just want to, I want to support families and I wanna and I wantto continue to do that in my career and support the choices that understand atleast the tough choices that women have to make. That oftentimes men don't. Andit's different, it's just different and it needs different management anddifferent approaches and frankly more generosity towards women than it doestowards men that are, you know, uh, going through their career. Okay. Isaid my piece, this isn't about me. It's about you all right. Any any anyquick strokes of luck that you might...

...want to dive into. Sure, yeah, I willsay that I did not used to necessarily believe in luck. I felt that, you know,some luck exists. But I read the book great by choice recently, which mostfolks probably listening have read. Not I recommend it. It's an easy read. Butwhat I learned from reading that book is what's important about luck is luckexists. There is some luck that's going to exist, right? There are things thatare out of your control, but it's about what you do with that luck and themindset and the approach that you take to that. So you could have somethinggreat happened and you can squander it or, you know, you could have somethingthat's super unlucky and maybe you're just down about it and you don't takeadvantage of something that can come out of it. So I think for me the mostrecently in my career, the recruiter that reached out to me actually aboutlonger advantage reached out and I shut him down. I mean he reached out andsaid, hey, I got this opportunity, I think you'd be a great fit and I shuthim down and he came back around to me and said, no, I really think you wantto take this phone call and I think...

...about that moment all the time becauseI could not be in a better role for me, my skill set, my passions than I amright now and had he not come back to me then I wouldn't be here. And so Ithink that that's just super lucky that the right person reached out who wasn'tafraid of rejection I guess. So yeah, that was definitely an example of somegood luck that came my way. Good good salesperson. Let's find out who thatrecruiter is. Well look, you know, I'm sure along the way you picked up somegood tactics, share one with us that people can kind of use in theireveryday work. Yeah, so I think a couple of things regardless of thetactic because I think in marketing or sales, whatever it could be, you know,you could be using linkedin or email or trade shows or whatever it is, but Ithink there's a couple of things that apply regardless of the tactic. One isum don't be afraid to go with your gut.

So if you don't have the data behindsomething, if you're, especially in startup or growth growth stage company,you're not going to always have the data and and feel comfortable with thatand feel comfortable saying I don't have data but based on best practicesare based on what I know or my gut is telling me that this is the right thingto do. But then once you have the data right, so go forward with with your gutand lean into it, but get the data out of it or once you have the data listento the data and I think that it's easy to have to have those two thingsconflict where as a marketer you you quote know that there's a tactic thatworks better than others. But then you run a campaign and you look at the dataand it tells you something very different and so be willing to say Iwas wrong or wow, things change. This didn't work for this did work. And so Ithink regardless of the tactic marrying those two things and having confidencein those two things, it's just super important. Love it, love it. Alright,anybody you're hiring for any positions.

So I am not hiring in the marketingorganization right now. We actually are, we grew about four x last year, sowe're studying out right now, but I will say that supply chains on fire,we're really now we've grown the sales or the marketing or we're looking togrow the sales. Or now you might mean you might mean actually on fire with nochips and no cars and no lumber and no, not that maybe maybe you can't solveall these things, but we would love to. So yeah, if there's sales folks outthere, the supply chain background let me know. We are definitely looking tofill some rolls great. And then anybody you want to give shoutouts to either upand comers or you know, folks that you follow the content, all that otherstuff. So my recent find and the Pavilion community knows both of theseguys really well, but josh brown braun who does a lot of sales training. Hiscontent is just phenomenal. If you are...

...in a Bt role or sales role, I'verecently gone down the rabbit hole with his content and can't recommend itenough on the marketing side, Kyle Lacy. I think he does a phenomenal job withbranding and I lean into his content because I traditionally a more probablyhave a revenue mind. And so if you're looking to balance yourself out, lookat what he's done with less only it's, it's super interesting. Kyle holds thetrophy for the most shout outs in this sector of the podcast. I guess I haveto have him on at some point and we'll, and we'll see who he shouts. That'sinteresting. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So both of those guys and then from an up andcomer perspective, there were some folks that I worked with in Manhattanthat were just phenomenal and one of those, one of those people, I would sayher name is Michelle Jacoby and she goes by MJ folks listening may know herwell. I would definitely um, count her as one of the up and coming folks inthe Atlanta market as well. Love that,...

...love that. And finally most and I'm sohappy that you're a restaurant person. So I know this is gonna be a greatanswer. I get all the great answers, but I know some are better than others.Where should I eat? So next time you're in Atlanta hit up bill tongue bar, it'ssouth african so you get like jerky and then just legitimate south africanrecipes and amazing cocktails. Huh? Where is it? There's one in thePerimeter area and one in Alpharetta. Mm I love it. I will go there.Hopefully you can join me. Uh you know when we get back to traveling, whichwill be pretty soon. I hope by the time this this goes, we're all traveling. Soso come on down, we'll hang out. Love it lee. Well look so great to have youon, awesome to hear your very inspiring story and I'm psyched to come and joinin and have a drink of you in Atlanta. Great, thanks for having me on. Iappreciate it. Thank you. That is our...

...show. Thank you so much for listening.Really appreciate it. If you love the show, send it to some friends, parents,sisters, brothers, kids rate and review. Hit. Subscribe all those thingsanything you want. A reminder. This episode was brought to you by drift,the new way businesses by from businesses. You can learn more and getthe conversation started at drift dot com. I had fun today. Hope you did too.Now go crush your numbers. Say something. Mhm.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (174)