The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 11 months ago

Ep 115: The Mobile Device Revolution w/ Mike Kavanagh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 115: The Mobile Device Revolution w/ Mike Kavanagh

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome to the Pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon martin you're listening to. Is this a good time the show where I asked Pavilion Members some cool questions. They have great answers and it's a lot of fun. Please subscribe. So you don't miss an episode, Tuesdays and Thursdays they come out and I hope you're listening. Our guest today is my cavanaugh. He's the VP of sales and marketing at dock your face. And we talked about earlier in his career when he was selling mobile devices and maybe was part of the taken out Blackberry. We'll see this episode is brought to you by drift. More than 50,000 businesses use drift to grow revenue and increase customer lifetime value faster drift, helps their customers online sales and marketing on a single platform to deliver a unified customer experience. Where people are free to have a conversation with the business at any time on their terms, learn more at drift dot com. Alright, let's do this episode 52. Is this a good time on? All right, We are here with Mike...

...cavanaugh. He is the VP of sales and marketing at Dhaka phase. Mike. So, great to have you on Brandon. Thank you for having me thrilled to be here. Also the chapter head in Tampa. If I got that right? Yes, newly minted chapter head. So, I was a member up in Atlanta. I moved down to Tampa last august and signed up to to try and start a chapter during the middle of a pandemic. Why not give it a shot? Maybe we'll just call you florida man. No problem. You know that's a tough one. That's a tough one. Okay, fine. All meat. No fellow. Let's jump right in to tell us about your current role and then how you got here. You you have you have some really killers spots that you worked on your resume. Clearly things like Salesforce and pronto forms a couple others. Yeah. So yeah I've been very fortunate some luck in there. Some hard work, some grip. But I've been very fortunate but I've been with documents since last august I joined the company post acquisition by a private equity firm...

...and I had worked with the PE firm during the due diligence. Look at their market and sales stack And numbers and performance. Really exciting company. Been around about 20 years doing document management automation and it was a chance for me to go from just leading sales. I've been making cracks like any sales guy about you know marketing and all that. So I don't do that because all the market is the thing I don't do that. I was that guy. I will say this it's been a great experience. I've learned that time marking is harder than any sales guy anticipates. So shout out to my marketing peers and it's been really fun growing the business pivoting from lead generation, mostly coming from trade shows to full digital strategy and, and that sort of thing. Cool, So go back for a second. The PED brought you in to kind of due diligence and then and then said, hey, would you, would you join this company? This is where I think circumstance, dumb luck, you know, hard work comes into play. I um, I do some consulting expert...

...membership with G. L. G. So I encourage anybody who's in the R. C. To go sign up, they're always looking for people. But the G LG reached the, reached out to me, asked me about low code application platform, I connected with the private equity firm, We had further discussions and uh, we really got along, these guys have a great growth mindset, which I really enjoyed working with. And so after they acquired the company, they brought in a new ceo, they connected us. He and I really hit it off well and uh, it was just a really great opportunity. And at the time when I was, I was looking to stretch myself, right, I've been running enterprise sales, I had been running partnerships. This was a chance to, to stretch my, my skills and my abilities in the marketing side of the world. Very cool. And you moved for the role? Yes. My wife and I packed up the bags from Atlanta. We've been there eight years and decided to give the Tampa Clearwater area. We love it. It's, you know, we loved Atlanta but not being the of the beat. We're both from the...

Northeast, no, no beaches in Atlanta. So we're down by the beach and hopefully going to get out there this weekend if the weather improves, that's cool, very cool. Well you touched on a little bit of the luck and hard work stuff go in a little deeper there. I mean obviously everyone hustles, but where did you get some lucky breaks? I mean I'll take it all the way back to the, to the beginning of my career. I started my career in sales at A T and T. I went through there six Month training program, boston my but making 7500 cold calls a day, graduated the program top of the class when I got a signed up in boston and I'm one of those people. If you tell me something can't be done, I'm gonna prove it wrong. So I was fortunate enough to get assigned to an account called boston scientific, big device, medical device manufacturer and got them to sign a significant commitment contract for mobility. And then in working with them, I was fortunate to be in the mobility space...

...at a really interesting time. Blackberry was kind of as you can remember declining IOS was coming in and then this thing came out called the ipad and no one knew what to do with it. And fortunately boston scientific was trying to to change the way their sales team interacted with doctors in the hospitals. And we actually ended up selling them about 3000 ipads. It was the first large scale enterprise ipad rollout. So what it was, numeral, you know the first I've had uh piece of junk that I mean when you think about like what it was and now today it's insane. But it was such a cool experience. And I can recall years later I was, I was in a hospital unfortunate for some other stuff. But I saw boston scientific guy walking around. They had these like custom cases made and he's like doing his work on the ipad is like, and it's one of those moments you don't see it too often you're here. But like I had I had a small but critical part in playing in...

...that and it was, it was really cool and so it was a little bit of heart, a lot of hard work, a lot of luck and being at the right place at the right time. And that spring boarded me too to Samsung because they were trying to replicate what Apple was doing and unseat some blackberry business. So it really worked out very well for me. I can't I can't say enough nice things about Apple I guess. Yeah, I mean except except for when you were at Samsung. Yeah, no, and then you're like, well if you can do this for Apple, you can do it for us. I was like, yeah, sure why not? And we did. We, it was great. Samsung was a great experience. Like working, they had no B two B sales channel when I was there. So there was like 10 of us that got hired and we literally got to build the B two B sales strategy for mobility for Samsung. It was like a startup. But inside this and having just a very good brand, unlimited funny behind us. It was awesome. Yeah, I was going to say you like, did you know, it must have been a lot of money put into that because it was, it is like you're saying this is the dawn of mobility. Everyone's like...

...because the device was hard. Right? Well yeah, if you think about like back then, so Blackberry was the, was the go to for enterprises, right? Like I loved him. Everybody had them. But IOS came on the market and you know, I? T like, oh, we're not going to certify. But executives said, yeah, we are. And Blackberry didn't really respond correctly. They didn't take it seriously. And thankfully Samsung saw an opportunity, IOS was obviously exclusive to A T and T at the time. So they pitched a, you know, Andrew is a bit more fragmented and get too technical, but it gave the opportunity for there to be another player. And Samsung had a big enough presence to say, hey, we can offer you these android devices across the whole portfolio with the same, the I T specs, the security and it was, it was really cool and we got to build the playbook and make it as we were going and see what people were wanted to see. And it it was a cool two years. It was hard...

...because eventually it just became who's got a better screen, who's got this but great team, amazing guys I learned a ton from and that's where I got my first taste of channel and partner sales and I've been a you know it's one of the things that's guiding me through the rest of my career. It's always when I come back to when I'm talking to startups. Channel partnerships are can be a massive force multiplier. So it has worked for both Apple and Samsung. What would you say killed the Blackberry? Was it apple or was it actually like android devices? Because I'm thinking of it now, like no company was buying their whole executive team apple devices back then because of all the security reasons or whatever. Maybe. Yeah maybe it was the second maybe with Samsung and the and I think it was a whole a whole lot of things happen you know the C the C suite wanted that they wanted the cool device so I was forced to do it and then it kind of trickled down. I think Apple did a great job of making something that people just wanted right they figured it out and then what I'll see what Blackberry didn't do, they didn't take it...

...seriously. They didn't remember the Blackberry came into our office at A T. And T. When I was still there and like oh well we have the security and our battery life is better and and it was like great but the C. Level executive at one of my largest customers wants it and he's going to get it. But what was really cool as you saw this whole other thing, this whole other business spring up because Blackberry had the security and the management companies like Air watch that eventually got bought by VM ware and Mobile iron. And these others sprang up to fill that gap of the Blackberry security servers and, and then that led to a whole other business stream that became critical for these organizations and it was a great time to be in the space. It was a lot of fun. It was, it was probably the most fun I had in my sales career just like, you know, going through stuff like that. It was cool. Yeah. That's a nice little peek into a world that maybe some people don't like. Ones are like, what are you talking about? Like a black very black. Yeah, A quick story. I,...

...when I worked for pronto forms. Pronto forms as a Canadian company. God bless. There are still some loyal blackberry users out there. I would fly to Canada, Get, I would land in Canada and people will be powered off their Blackberrys. God, you know, so there is a loyal, there's still a small loyal fan base there somewhere shout out to all five of you that might be listening to the podcast. Um, well we kind of went through the luck and hard work. Give us attack. Give me something that you're, you know, that's your secret sauce. Yeah. So there's two things that when I look at an organization, the first is the buyer experience, what is the buyer trains And that starts not just like that starts from when they get to your website all the way through the whole thing. And I think you talk to folks listening guys like jake Dunlap and others like it's all about that buyer experience, It's changed and if companies aren't changing with it, they're making a mistake. So one of the...

...things I advocate and what we've done here since I came to Dhaka phase was I eliminated the, the SDR qualification call. It's not to say Sdrs are important. I love the Sdrs out there. You guys do critical work to the business. But if I'm a buyer and I come to your website and I've done research and I want to talk to somebody, that qualification doesn't offer a lot of value for me. I want to talk to the au, who's going to show me something. So we've done away with that, you know, and put the Sdrs back into a hunting, you know, hunting but not just in the hunting the hunting side and then implemented chili piper and let people book directly on my eighties calendars. And you know, our conversion to meetings book is, has improved drastically. And the ultimately more important than anything, the buyer has a better sense like, okay, this is going to be the person I'm gonna deal with. This isn't going to be a handoff because no matter how well you do on the handoff, it's still a repetitive task for them. Yeah, yeah, for sure. They have to repeat a bunch of things and like, yeah, never. It never feels...

...great. At least when I'm buying. So if I get that. All right, well what happened for right now Right now? Oh man, critical customer success managers and account managers. Those are the two biggest things. We've, we've got about, well, we have 400 customers in documents and we acquired a company a few weeks ago that has another 300. We need to do more to show them the love shout out to the revenue collective for the recent class with winning by design around the, the uh, the bowtie model. I, I'm a big believer in this, you know, the constant expansion of the constant driving values. So account managers and CSN's, if you know anybody, send them my way please. Beautiful. Beautiful. And I know you said jake already, who else you shouting out for content? Who, who do you like, really appreciate what they do besides all the things going on it. A billion a k a. The former, the former revenue collected for this old school guys scott leases another guy that I follow consistently the surfing sales podcast I love. And for the, you know, I work at a private equity small...

...company. I don't have a full time rev. Ops resource. So big shout out to to a lane over there in the red box community. So I, that's where I, I spend my time in the science and the, and the folks who are leading the charge, their love it. Cool man. All right, well look, all that stuff is for everybody else, for me. I need to know where we eaten and I'm actually gonna, I'm gonna put you on, on picking a place in Tampa. Okay, I'm gonna go, it's a layup. It's an easy one, but it's still fun and enjoyable. Burns steakhouse. The stakes are good. The presentation, the show is even better for those of you haven't been there, awesome steakhouse. They'll take you for a wine tour, the desert run upstairs. If you come to Tampa, check it out baker reservation. It's a great time. It really is. And also like bring your calculator for figuring out how to order a steak there because they order...

...a steak, buy like looking at three grids on the number of minutes it's going to be cooked and the and the and the thickness of it and then the cut. It's uh it's insane. It's they have it down to a science. We, I always love my times there. Good man. We're going there when I'm down in Tampa. Like come on down. We'd love to have you so good to have you on brother and we'll, you know, we'll keep in touch man. I appreciate Brendan, have a great day, enjoy the weekend man. Yeah, you too. All right, that is our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please write interview, apple podcast, Spotify app anywhere you want, send it to a friend, smashed the subscribe button. Show us some love, remind. This episode is brought to you by drift, the new way businesses by from businesses. You can learn more and get the conversation started at drift dot com. I had fun. Hope you did too. Now go crush your numbers.

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