The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 45: Mindset Is Everything with Tom Short

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Mindset Is Everything with Tom Short  

...a what? Everybody. Thank God it's Monday. Welcome back to another episode of the revenue collective podcast. This is your host, Tom Alamo. I'm here to help you up. Level your game on a Monday morning before we get to today's episode. I just want to give a quick shout out to our sponsor. This month. Sponsor is six cents six cents. The number one account engagement platform helps you identify accounts that are in market for your solution. Prioritize your efforts, engage buyers the right way with highly relevant messaging and measure what actually matters. With six cents platform, you're able to get into more deals. Improved win rates, increase overall pipeline and optimized budget. Spend toe. Learn more of his six cents dot com slash revenue Collective for this week's episode. I've got Tom Short. He's the chief growth officer at Lapin 1 80. He is from beautiful Indianapolis, Indiana, and, uh, you know, a good friend and mentor of mine. You wanna have Tom on the show to talk about his? His whole key is mindset. Is everything right? So what we do get tactical into what he does as a chief growth officer and how he helps to run the business and helps drive revenue for lap in 1 80. A lot of what we talk about is mindset. How attitude mindset really is everything. So it's a wide ranging conversation. We talk books. We talked leadership. We talk personal development. I think you're really going to enjoy our conversation. If you do, the only ask that we have is go to Apple podcasts and just leave a review and subscribe. If you hit a five star review, that's what helps us to grow this show. It helps us to get better guessed. It helps us just really just put together a better show for you. And at the end of the day, all we're trying to do is provide value to you, the members of this community. So please, you could check us out there. You can always add me on. Linked in my name is Tom Alaimo again? I'd love to chat with you. I'd love to hear any feedback you have on the show. I'm out here in San Francisco, So without further ado, let's get straight into this conversation with my good friend Tom Short. Mr. Mindset, the king of the cold called Tom Short. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having Tom happy to be here. One of my favorite people to have a conversation with. And that's how I get to kick off my Tuesday mornings. I appreciate you joining, and I didn't even have to pay you to say that. So I appreciate that. Absolutely, man. Absolutely. So I wanna just jump right in. I'm not one for too much chit chat or talk about the weather, and I think that's pretty poignant to you as well. And and the first time we met. I've told this story before, but it's too good not to tell. Uh, the first time that we talked on the phone. I think we met through linked in. I think the first question you asked me was not like, you know, where are you or what's the weather like or what's your job? Or anything like that was like, What are three books that you've read that have changed your life or changed you as a person? And that really took me took me back and I'd love to hear a little bit of context around why you ask that and even what your answer would be to a question like that. Sure, It kind of spurred time out of, you know, everyone was doing a lot of zooms and as a way to stay connected when everything started last March. And so I just personally was like, I'm tired of going through the song and dance of all the questions you just laid out. And as an avid reader, I was like, You know what? I'm gonna flip the script. I'm going to just ask what are three books, and as you mentioned, it's a two part question. So not just books you recommend. But tell me three books that both describe you as a person, right? So if you told me those three books, I might be able to get a little insight. Obviously, I'm gonna have some follow up questions. So three books that both describe you and then tell me one thing that you've...

...taken away or one thing that still had an impact on you to this day since you read that book and what I found is when you ask that question one or two things, you're gonna go down a great path with someone and have ah really insightful conversation or someone will just say, Hey, I don't read. And then and then that's when I hang up. No, I'm just kidding. But it'll it'll tell you a lot of insight into someone. Andi, I think the second part of your question was, you know, if I had to answer that as I mentioned to you always the first book I'll respond with always have as my top and it's a man's search for meaning really powerful, highly recommend it. Victor Frankel concentration camps back in World War Two, and he essentially has one quote in the book of many. But you know, you can take everything from a man you can strip everything away. The one thing which you cannot touch is his attitude and how he chooses to respond any set of circumstance. And we're talking about somebody who endured unthinkable circumstances, lost his whole family, lost his life's work, and he still had the wherewithal to say, I'm not gonna let any of that affect me because you can kill me. But you can never take away how I respond to something, and that's pretty powerful when you let that sink in the other two. I always like to mix up all through a new one in or when I mentioned with you before, but the courage to be disliked. I think that is really powerful for anyone, not only in sales or business, because there's this human nature for us to be liked by other humans. I was originally recommended this book back when I was officiating, and officiating is just a human cascade of emotions. You're dealing with rejection and no different than sales. And you're dealing with high conflict conversations no different than sales or business. And so that really made me turn my framework. Thio. You know when I walk on the court or if I walk into a, um, business conversation, I don't want that person toe like me, but they will respect me, right? I'm going to be respectful, but I want them to trust me, and that's gonna The trust is going to be earned over time. But I'm not there to make friends and just be this likable, likable person. And I think that's something that we can all take from that, and then the third one, I will probably add in there, which is which is new. Your Tom and I was like toe to switch it up, but I would I would go with Peak. It's one of the books I just read this year, um, from Dr Ericson, who recently passed away. But secrets from the science of expertise. I'm sure a lot of your listeners will know about Malcolm Gladwell and how he talks about the 10,000 hours of practice. He actually Cherry picked that from one of Dr Erickson's experiments, and he actually calls it out in the book, but it really dives into it. There's no such thing as this innate talent. People just think there's child prodigies and all this. There's certain circumstances that kids in the environment that they're in that encourages them to want to get better at something, and it goes and dispels all these innate things. But he essentially says that expert performers in any walk of life have two things in common. One. They prioritize sleep in recovery, which I love to hear that, and two, they have deliberate, intense our long practice sessions, and then they walk away to just free up their mind, clear their mind, and then they get back into it. So it was that deliberate, intentional picking one thing to get better at and not doing it for four or five hours at a time, doing it really intense for an hour and then stepping away. So those are my three books that I give your listeners today. Man, I love that. I've read the first two. I haven't touched the last one, though I was recommended it a long time ago. It's on my list, but now I think it's it's definitely moving up that list that might get purchased today. I love the sound of it, so I mean, I think that's a great networking. You...

...know, I hate to use the word hack, but what kind of a hack of of the way to break through that, You know, normal 20 minute conversation and break through the pleasantries and get really to the meat and potatoes of how you get to know someone I'd love to hear. And and most of the folks listening to this are part of revenue. Collective are mostly most likely bought in on the power of networking and building out your network and spending time to do that. I'd love to hear as an executive as a C suite member, Like, what is your strategy for building out a really strong network? Tom, that's a really great question, because it's like anything else that you want to dio. There needs to be some intentionality behind it, and what I mean by that is, if you would've asked me six months or a year ago, I would have thought I'm pretty good at networking, right? It comes natural. I enjoy meeting new people. I like asking questions, this curiosity, to understand how someone thinks or why they do what they dio. But and I started asking more and more people as I'm networking, I'm like, Hey, can I Can I ask you how How do you go about this? How do you structure? Because for me, there's a a famous study out there, and I can't remember his name. But it's like the rule of 1 50. Have you heard of this? As far as like, yeah, Dunbar principal or something that was only like, 150. And so I set out and I was like, Okay, I wanna be intentional and I don't have the perfect system. So any any of the listeners. If you've developed a system and come up with something great, reach out to me because I wanna I wanna get better at this. But I've essentially set up free hub spot CRM account. And I'm now putting people in there that I network with and I wanna be mawr consistent, Almost like almost like prospects, right? Like we've got. I've got a process for that. But I've never had a process or system in place for networking. So I want to know that, all right, when I talked to Tom and he tells me that he's into a B and C and he shares this, that I want to know that if if I read an article or I come across a podcast, I want to be able to go in there and say who in my network could could benefit from this, And I want to be able to shoot off a text or an email and say, Hey, was thinking about you heard this, you know, based on our last chat, thought you might enjoy this. And I also want to know Hey, I haven't reached out to that person in in two months. E I want I want to catch up with them and see how things were going. They had mentioned, you know, they were struggling with this before in their life. I'm genuinely I care about this person, and I want to see how things were going. So I've really put some intentionality. By no means do I have it. Have it figured out. But I've found myself mawr consistent and more in a groove when I am connecting with people and taking notes and being able to follow up in a more consistent manner. So do you keep that number to 1 50 or less? Or is it just everyone that is top of mind? And maybe there's different tiers or priorities of people you know? I'm still I'm still teasing that out, right? I think I just looked at it the other day. I was, like, right around like 100 and 2526. I think so. I'm not quite there, but I could see how, after 150 it just it's There's only so much time in the day, right? And so I don't I don't know if that I haven't I don't know if you've really going deep on Dunbar's principle or philosophy. I'm sure there's some psychology behind it. I think that seems to be like a good number for me. And I'm sure, is my network grow. It's like anything else, right? You you meet people, you just have a stronger connection with you. And I've had a really strong connection since we meet, and then you're those people stay top of mind. But I think just having something in place where I can fall back on my notes and say Hey, Tom and I talked about this. Hey, I talked about this. I'm going to check in with, you know, catch up with this person, so I haven't figured it out. But that number seems there seems to be some solid backing behind that. And is there a...

...frequency that you try to keep up with people like once a quarter once a month? I mean, obviously, you know, it's it's not a perfect system by any means, but I'm just curious if you try to make sure Hey, I haven't reached out to this person x amount of time. I'm gonna Oh, yeah. I'm gonna find a reason, Thio. You know, shoot him a text and just make sure everything's all do it over there. Yeah, mine's 60 days. Eso I'm, uh, again don't have this mapped out and it's, you know, all I'm sure I'll come up with different versions of it. But 60 days seems to be like, you know, that doesn't mean I mean, I've shot off text to you more frequently if, like, hey, I came across this, you might enjoy this, or but it's just it's knowing that people that you know in that I'm networking with and and I'm sharing information like we were generally like the same things and read the same things and go back and forth on some topic. So I'm like, Alright, if it's, you know, if it's beneficial to me, this person might find some value or they might enjoy this. So yeah, I find it to be about 60 days and find a reason if I have it to reach out to that person. If for no other reason. Just say, I've been thinking about you. Let's grab a cup of coffee and catch up. Yeah, I heard a new interview a while ago with um, I've heard two different people that I look up to or that I respect say something similar. One was Buzz Williams, who's a college basketball coach who you may be familiar. Maybe you left one of his games on the other one is e okay. And the other one is the other one is, uh, Jesse Itzler, who's, you know, an entrepreneur who's, you know, relatively well known what relatively famous. And both met a similar system of like either sending an email or a text or a hand written letter to, you know, the list was smaller. It was maybe, like 30 22 30 to 50 people and trying to do that, you know, once a month or every other month. And Buzz Williams was so crazy about it. He he was talking about like, every single month for like, 10 years in a row. He had these 30 people that he'd write a hand written letter to, which is really intense. But I've tried to take some of those principles and, like I've got a running sheet of people that some folks that are, you know, ahead of me in my career, some that are you know, maybe more on the same plane with in terms of experience and age and things like that. And then some people that are younger that I tryto, you know, have some sort of touch points. But now that we're here, I mean, what's the Buzz Williams story? Well, so real quick, cause I think I might have seen this. Was that his interview with Jon Gordon? It waas Yeah, that was a great That was a great interview. It's funny, Right? When I was in officiating, I didn't like a lot of coaches and it was probably mutual, and I'm okay with that. And I was younger and not as mature, but I've actually started following buzz a little bit. Kind of pains me to say that, and I like a lot of the stuff he says. I really dio I've gotten that interview. He's There's another talk he gave at a high school coaches conference, but anyway, I digress. So this the buzz stories and for those of you that don't maybe just provide a little context to the listeners I officiated Division One basketball and feeble, which is international for 10 years, just recently stepped aside just prioritize family and work and other things. So anyway, there's all these pre season tournaments. I say preseason there at the beginning of the season before conference play, and it was down and, um, Orlando. And there's no one really there, right? This is like the day before Thanksgiving, The only people in the stands. It kind of looks like Cove it now, right, like the only people in the stands are like family of the team and supporters, whatever. So we're shooting free throws. And who was Texas A and I'm playing. I can't remember if it was Harvard or I can't remember and he's yelling across the...

...court, one of my partners, and normally if this is a game with a bunch of fans, you're not gonna hear him. But it's just echoing throughout the gym, and I just I've never had buzz before the game, and I just turned around very point and I said, Hey, Buzz, he'll be over here in a second to talk to you, just just giving them chance. We not going help anyone. If you're yelling across the court and Buzz wants to go on about, do you know who I am? and all this and I'm like, in my mind, I'm like, Alright, just compose yourself. Don't react, just respond. And so the next time going down the court, he wants to start it again. Do you know who I am? You're not going to talk to me like that. And I was like I said, Yeah, I know who you are. We both have something in common. We've never advanced in the N C a a tournament, and I just walked away. Eso he didn't He didn't. But there's some coaches They want to know where the line in the sand is, right? Like they want to know. How far can they push you? And I just wanted him to know back to courage, to be disliked. Hey, I'm gonna be respectful of you. But if you start on this, do you know who I am? You're not going to play that game with me. And so I had to just tell them and it was very stern when I said I said that, you know, because we've got something very much in common. I know who you are. Either one of us in advance in the tournament, and he kind of looked at me like This guy is crazy And I always had a mentor say that as an official, you want the coaches to think you're a little bit nuts so that they don't mess with you and so that that's my That's my Buzz Williams story. That's hilarious. I didn't know reps talk smack like that. I didn't when I started. Right? And it Z you've got, it's it's It's like sales, right? You've got to kind of have your own personality. You can't just take a, uh you know, if if Leonardo DiCaprio gets a script right, he's going to say it a lot different than you and I, and so is an official. You just can't be a robot. And you've got a You know, you're only as good as your last call. So you've gotta have this, you know, kind of gut. So inside. And that swagger. Confidence, too, because I I very much switching into a different person when I was on the court. But it's almost like creating this persona of like I'm gonna be fair, but I'm gonna be firm. I'm gonna put the line in the sand so you can't just be a first year official and come out and make those comments. This was, you know, I think the last year I officiated, so I had some experience under my belt, but yeah, there's definitely, ah, game within the game, you know, inside the inside the lines, for sure. I love that. I love the inside scoop there. I want to make a little bit of, ah, of a pivot here and knowing that, you know, you're a C suite chief growth officer at no business that you folks have. What about a half a dozen employees? Is that right? So for the small business, you know, owners for the folks that are working at at small startups right now, I love for you to to talk a little bit About what? You know what's top of mind for you as a business like we're going, you know, we've kicked off 2021. Last year's was tough for, you know, most businesses I know that. You folks, I think we're we're traveling doing a lot of sales, trading and things like that before, So I imagine it was a It was a challenging year. I think it was for all of us. So but what are some of the things that you keep top of mind that are really key priorities for you, a ZA leader this year and knowing that you probably have 17 hats you're wearing at such a small organization? So for me, right, it's first and foremost, you know, new sales, right? And bringing in new clients that not not only bring in a client for the sake of bringing a client bringing in the right clients, because it's easy to just bring in anyone and everyone. But if it's not a right fit, you're gonna what's the cost of the long term right? Like, yes, there's some revenue on the front end. But if if what's the cost gonna be? So you know, first and foremost, and I talk about this with people that either you know, p piece of sales or, you know, people starting out in their first role of sales is you've...

...got to become really good at saying no and understanding. You know Gary Keller talks about in his book the one thing like What's your one thing in your role? What is that one thing? That one goal that. You know, if you got that right, everything else will fall into place. And so it starts with with time blocking. It starts with knowing that everything you say yes to. Because regardless, if you're in ah, first year role as a salesperson or you're like, there's always gonna be things to say yes to. And I don't know if I've shared this with you before the average elite performer. Have I asked you this question before? Do you know how many times you know, for every time? Okay, this is a great question for your audience to if you had to guess so. Elite performers in all walks of life business, sports performers, whether it be artists or musicians or actors, whatever. Do you know how many times you had to guess? The average times? Number of times they say no forever. Yes. What would your guest be? 20 7000 one. Think about that. My my original guest was like, I don't know, like 157,000 to 1 meeting. They will say no 7000 times before they say yes. Now, granted, that might be a stretch, but if you look at any elite performer, regardless of industry or feel there's a lot of similarities, right? I You and I have talked about this a lot. Kobe was he would say, I don't I don't care what your craft is, what you do like if you are elite, I can learn from you. And I think that's the biggest, like take away I got was It doesn't matter what, like I want to study elite. If you're the best person at folding towels like tell me your process. What's your morning routine like? How do you How do you stay focused? How do you like I can learn something from you? And so, yeah, saying no is probably the biggest you know, to kind of circle back to your question, being able to say no in realizing we're not that important at the end of the day, right? Like we're all replaceable. So how do you stay in that mindset to say no for everything that you could say yes. To which ties back into your one thing and that. Is that how you determine which is that? Yes, if it ties directly back to that one thing or what's your filter? Yeah, So you know, mine is ah is a revenue goal. Right? So I know. Okay, it's X. That's my for for professional. Obviously, I've got personal and everything else that is my filter, but Alright, my and I take goals and I look at him and then I put him away. I don't look at a goal and people gonna That's the most ludicrous thing. No, I have a process. I know that if I if my effort is consistent every single day, I know that the ast Bill Walsh would say the score will take care of itself. I'm too focused on every single day showing up that I don't care about what the end goal is. So to back up, I've got my one goal. My one thing. Right. So now how Doe I build out a daily schedule and weekly schedule that is going to give me the best chance to succeed, and you and I have talked about it with the prospecting blocks and blocking off my schedule on knowing Okay, these are either revenue generating activities or their non revenue generating activities. And if I start to get more non revenue generating activities, that's a red flag. And so for me, it's just alright. Blank slate of a calendar each week, all right? And I know I'm gonna map out these things, and then I'm gonna fill in the networking, and then I'm gonna fill in Lincoln, and then I'm gonna fill everything else gets filled in after those revenue generating activities, not the other way around. And what percentage of time, if you worked for, you know, I'm not gonna...

...make up a number of how many hours you work in a day or a week, but maybe a percentage Like how? What percentage of time is focused on that one goal and what is everything else? Because, obviously everyone, especially executives, you have a lot of, you know, things that you have to take care of that are, you know, not ideal that are not necessarily directed to that one goal that our obligations and some sort that you have to take care of. So what would be the rough percentage that you would say? You're working on things that are tied to number one goal? Yeah, and I get your question. It's just it's so hard to put a number to that right, Like I can say 60. But maybe for some people it needs to be 80. Or maybe it needs to 90. Or or maybe it's only 50 because you've you're in a group and you're so like, I understand your question. I don't know for me to just throw a number out there that would be so arbitrary, and I feel like it would be fluctuating for so many different people. You know it. Hearing that question, Tom reminds me of, you know, when people when I used to hear how often people read from like, a time standpoint, I'm like, How do you How do you read that? How do you How much? How do you have that much time? And then I read a study where the average person a day has 3.5 hours of unintentional reading. So whether that's social media, whether that's various things throughout the day, of just meaning, like scrolling through LinkedIn reading stuff, and I'm not saying none of that's important, I'm just saying when you start to switch your mindset and your perspective of if it matters, you'll make time for it. That's when I think you'll be able to figure out your percentage right because it's so easy to say I need to do this or I have to do this. But you really have to I don't know. I can't answer that for people. But when you start to switch and become or intentional about why you're doing what you're doing, that's when you'll start to figure out maybe what percentage of your day needs to be tied to that. Okay, so So maybe I'll wanna get it this in another angle. So it sounds like you're also taking time to, you know, block time on your calendar for those activities. And then everything kind of falls falls around that the, you know, the networking, the LinkedIn, the whatever else that that may come up in a week, the internal meetings. Could you go through what your process is like when you do it, and some of the things that you make sure that you schedule in in as much detail as you'd like to get into, uh, you know, Hey, I always sit down on Sunday morning. I've got my coffee and I'm always looking at, you know, lock down my prospecting and you know, maybe my morning routine. I have that blocked off in my calendar and maybe have time with my family in the afternoon. And then I feel in everything else. I just made that up, but but anything? Any details around that I think would be helpful for people here to, uh, you hit it right on the head. It starts on Sunday blank calendar, and I know that. You know, there's certain things I need to do every day and every week and so looking at that blank calendar, and I've just shifted where now my entire Monday is making prospect videos. That's all I do on Monday. No more networking. I'm just record. I'm 78 hours. I'm in front of a screen. It becomes a little daunting, but I'm just sitting there and I'm recording videos and I'm I'm sending those out. So Monday's I've changed are just videos. That's all I'm doing and then similar to you. I do have my morning routine where it's blocked out two hours, no screen exercise, journal, meditation and personal reading. So that's that's a non negotiable Monday through Friday. I like to make calls in the morning, just gets me going. I'm a morning person. That's where my energy is. So I like to have now pivoted as...

...well. I like to schedule my calls in the morning. Now I'll do some in the afternoon as well, but I get a lot of energy and I make this. You know, I challenge myself. Go have three conversations before noon, right? Like e don't know if anything is going to come from it, but that's how I'm pushing myself. I'm game of fighting it like let's go talk to three VPs of sales and, you know, see if it makes sense to have a conversation. So I'm making it a game for myself. So that's what I like to dio break for lunch. And I like to get away from screens. I'm not looking at a screen anymore when I'm eating. That really helps with mindfulness and being aware of what I'm doing and all either, you know, set aside 30 minutes for lunch and then either 30 minutes to just get outside and walk, depending on the weather here in Indiana or back in a book for 30 minutes. So some variation of that. Then, in the afternoon, the first couple hours is is either gonna be email or follow up, you know, on different prospecting and things that you know, tax, I need to follow up. And then I'm going to do another 20 minute meditation to break up my day. So for me, that's just an anchor that brings everything back. It helps break up my day. It gets me refocused on why I do what I dio. It helps me get present in in the moment so that anything that I am going to interact, any person I'm gonna interact with, I'm going to respond to not react. That's a huge difference. Responding, verse reacting and in the rest of the day is is where I like to schedule now, like networking or I'll take time Thio, you know, schedule out networking for the week, but and then the kind of the last piece, right? You know, I said, going from no to yes, But you know, my goal each week is to schedule a least five networking one on ones, but not mawr than two meetings and or networking in the same day. Does that make sense? So I very easily toe schedule three or four networking, you know, coffees or drinks or whatever. On one day, I just I cap it it to two a day. So it could be two on, you know, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. So, eight, No more than eight in a week and no more than two a day. Um, and same with meeting. Because I feel like you could just now sometimes that, you know, internal whatever could get broken. But I'm really steadfast on the holding myself to that no more than two a day. So I don't know if that was too much detail or not enough detail, but that's that's kind of my process of how I move forward. And I just know that every single day, right, I'm gonna treat each day like the first day, right? I'm gonna show up. How can I change the room that I walk in? How can I bring my effort and energy an attitude into that day? Because that's the only thing I control. I've got my week set up. But how can I become the best version of myself for today? If I love process? I love it. I love it. And I wanna put a pin in the first day. I want to get there in a minute, but I think that that structure is really helpful, probably for people to hear that. You know, I think we're all operating on less time, probably than we were a year and a half ago for working from home. If we have, you know, family obligations if the kids Aaron zoom if all the different things that are happening. And so I think having that structure is important, so it's, you know, kind of following. The principle of discipline equals freedom, right? If you have the discipline toe, get certain things done, then you will have the freedom to be ableto, you know, spend time with family or, you know, be able to read or network or whatever, because you already got those key things done. And I know that you have. You know, I believe a second kid on the way. And maybe by the time we put this out, you they might already be in the world, depending on when this gets released. But I'd love to hear just any thoughts or tips around how you've been handling the situation of Cove. It,...

...while being a working parent and everything going on. I think again that's something that a lot of folks are have been struggling with. Every everyone has a different system and and can relate to it. So I'd love to hear if you have any tips. If you have any processes that you found helpful anything like that, the short answer is implement the Derek Jeter rule. Do you know about the Derek Jeter rule? I talked about a za Red Sox fan. I've probably tried Thio avoid any articles like that, but I'm open to hearing it. Okay, so we'll let me let me first start by saying Our daughter is is a lot younger and she's not worrying about Zoom. So she's actually at school during the day. So let me just make a caveat by I'm not experiencing nearly the troubles of some of my friends and colleagues who have, you know, three kids that air 8 to 15 and three different rooms and zoom. So I I don't have all the answers. Let me just say that. But what I can offer is So Derek had Derek Jeter had a rule when he was playing. I don't know if this is still true. I think he's married now, is he? I don't know. Anyway. Okay. Okay. So he had a rule that when you came over to his house, right, you had to physically take your cell phone out and put it in a basket. It didn't matter who you are. If it was Joe Torry, if it was Tino Martinez, it didn't matter. Right, Mariana Rare. It didn't matter or or friends. He met at a social environment, right? We'll leave it at that. But everyone that came over to his house had to put their phone in a basket. Now, look, I don't have that role when you come to my house, but I am cognizant that when I come home, I want to be where my feet are. So I have a place where my phone gets plugged in it at night and it goes right there. So I want, you know, for that hour and a half, two hours. You know, after I get home when I'm, you know, spending time with my wife and daughter. That phone goes there, and I'm able to be present because you can be somewhere physically. But mentally, you could be a mile away or 20 miles away. And so one of the ways I'm able to do that is by not having my phone with me physically, because I know that that time is now. There's like they don't care that five VP of sales hung up on me at work. They don't care that nobody thought to talk about coaching for their sales team was relevant. They don't care about any of that. And they also don't care if I didn't sleep well and don't feel like it because they expect me when I come home to be husband first, Dad's second. And so I've got to put all that aside. And so one way that I'm able to physically do that is by putting the phone there. That's almost like my attachment to anything with that day is staying there, and I'm able to just show up and be present. So again, I don't have all the answers I've implemented that that rule myself. I still, you know, work at that and and struggle with that from time to time. But I found that to be a really powerful way of being in the moment and owning your little box and being where your feet are. And and that's how I'm able to change the room by being present. God, I love that rule and not I mean, you know, I guess, for people you know that come into your house, that that's kind of an interesting one, especially if you're serving dinner or something like that. But just to hold your own self accountable. And I'm talking about even if you are working from home, right, you're not going to an office like like may leave the phone in the office or the living room, or wherever you know you're you're doing your work before you go out and interact with, you know, your family or whoever it is that you're interacting with. So I love that rule, and I think I do a pretty good job of it sometimes that there's other times where you know, if the phones in the pocket, it's just...

...like a natural brain reaction that I have now that there's like, Oh, there's dead time, you know. Let's let's just open it and let's go check email or linked in or instagram or whatever the, you know, pick your poison. So I love the thought of just taking it off the table. It's almost like you're if you're trying to eat healthier. Don't keep Ben and Jerry's in the house. You know, it's like if you're not trying to check your phone, well, then just leave it in a different room for you know, the evening or whenever you're spending time with people. So I think that's a great yeah, one other quick tip I might share time that I've I've done. And it might seem counterintuitive to someone in sales. But, you know, if I lose the sale over it, that's, you know there's more important things in life. I've completely disabled all notifications on my phone. Mhm. So outside of my phone ringing and I take that back. The alarm. I I do get the alarm notifications on my on my phone, but ringing test. Not a text notification. So outside of the phone ringing, physical phone ringing or notifications from my alarm, I don't get any notifications on my phone. No text messages, no emails, no linked in updates. None of that And that has been such a huge help. It did it take some getting used to. Absolutely. But do I need to know a score and and in a Pacers game in the third? I don't need that notification in my life. There's enough that we're dealing with during the day. So all notifications turned off. I would challenge some of the listeners out there, give that a shot for a day or a week and and see if it doesn't doesn't help you a little bit. Gain control of your day. I love that. I love that. Maybe even you start with with something that I've done. I think you've done two of just like you don't have notifications, so maybe it's different. But keeping the phone on airplane mode the first hour of the day or two hours while you're doing you're you're just getting thio know yourself for the day. You know what I mean? Getting aware of your thoughts and waking up and showering and doing all the things that you might do in the morning of just not having not having a random signal, right? Because you don't when you open up that phone that's someone compared it to like, you know, spinning uh, spinning the wheel and the price is right or something like you don't know what that's gonna land on, right? Like that could be a great signal. Could be someone just wants to sign a deal with you. Or it could be, you know, a thing from you know, your CEO. That's, you know, a kind of a stress email or whatever it might be. So not playing the lottery at whatever time you're waking up in the morning, I think, has been something that help. May. Well, yeah, and that's that goes back to my respond verse. React right. That's why I don't I have my phone in my bedroom anywhere. It's like when I go to plug it in when I come home like I'm not getting that phone until I leave the house. And so no screen time when I say like I'm up at 4 30 consistently, and if I'm leaving the house at seven or whenever, like I'm not looking at the phone until then because if we pick up the phone and to your point, we see the email from the CEO, we see that a deal didn't get signed. We see for sports fan. The Red Sox lost three in a row. Like why is that gonna Why are you letting that dictate how your day starts? Because then, from there, it's just you're playing the comparison game. You're playing the reaction game. I'm going to decide how I respond to every external and internal element in my life and that starts with not looking at a screen, not looking at my phone. And I will dictate how my day is going to go. I'm not gonna let other people dictate that. And so if you don't have those external influences, how could How could your day not start? How you want Thio and look, I get it. We all have not we all. But some of us have kids. We have other things. Are there days like this morning? Did I get the full two hours? No, because had to take my daughter to school and some other things. But the point is just to be work at it like Seinfeld works at telling jokes. Just don't let two days in a row go without seeing a red X. Yep, I love it. I love it. And one of the things I love about our conversations is you seem to almost speaking in...

...mantra as you know, you have a lot of different sayings and philosophies and and I'm the same way. And I gravitate to a lot of people that think the same way. And I'm just interested by that. So as we're wrapping this up, I love for you to just go off for a minute about you know, the wristband that you have right now and, uh, and what that means to you. Yeah, so I I first got introduced to Dr Michaels Reveille several years ago, and he works with Microsoft and the Seattle Seahawks. He's, uh, cognitive psychologist. I know he's a psychologist, maybe not cognitive, but, um, sports psychologist. What have you great great person to follow and learn from and everything else. But, you know, he's got this concept of a personal philosophy right and and having, and there's a whole, you know, system of coming up with it and how you cultivate this, and it's It's really like the ultimate filter, right? It's It's ultimately your North Star, your guiding principle of how you are going to show up every day. And so it's one of those things, right? we hear about something, it's like I just push that aside and then we hear about something, that same thing from someone else, and you're like, OK, this might be trying to get through to me And then after the third time, I'm like a rule of three like third time it's like, Okay, let's let's dive deep. And so I got into this personal philosophy and I wanted to come up with one. And so, as you mentioned a wristband, how doe I wanted to create this so that I can wear it every single day. And it's a constant reminder of how I'm going to approach each day. And so you know, the one I came up with is, each day is like the first it's Each day equals first day and each is capitalized, and the each It stands for four qualities that if I embody those four qualities, and I'm conscious of tapping into those qualities every day, I know I'm setting myself up for success, whatever that might be. And it doesn't have to be monetary success. It's just how I view success. My happiness, my, how I'm gonna show up as a dad. How I'm gonna show up as a husband how I'm going to show up as a leader. And so the four qualities the correspondent letter e for empathy. I certainly, you know, want to be a little more empathetic and everything and understanding that everyone is going through something a authentic I'm unapologetically gonna be me. I'm not gonna be, you know, in your face about it. But I'm passionate and I'm just gonna be me because there's too many other people out there. We can only be ourselves. See us for child. Like I think being a dad really helps you like you just have fun. Like kids smile 400 times a day. When we become adults, we smile like 12 to 15 times, which is pretty, like astounding. So just having that child like mentality that, you know, looking at things from a new perspective a beginner's mind, if you will. But I'm gonna have fun along the way. I'm gonna smile a little bit more and then h humility. I certainly don't have all the answers, and I'm gonna do I'm gonna approach the day in a humble way, so treat each day like the first day and it's it's kind of Ah, like you and I talked about Tom like, how do we show up for our first day at work, right? Like show up a little bit early. No one really expects anything of us because we're the new guy or the new gal. We want to go out of our way to help others because right, like we just we want to make that good first impression. And it's no different than your first date, your first anything first day at school. And so how do we tap into that? So we don't lose because we all have that first day feeling and it's and it's exciting feeling you might put out your clothes before the night before you might, you know, look, you know, kind of plan how that day is going to go, and then it's like Then we become complacent and we take, we started. They take things for granted. And so for me, this is a good reminder. And then kind of the second part I'll leave you with is, you know, change the room. And I know that every single room I walk into there's more than likely a door frame. So that's kind of my reminder of every single room I walk into. I have the ability to change the room, have the ability to bring my best, most authentic self and let others feed off...

...of that energy. I can choose to just kind of go about my business and not ask how people are doing and not bring that extra energy. And don't get me wrong. This isn't like a fake like, Hey, I'm here to pump you up type thing, But you can feed off energy. You can make people wanna be become better versions of yourself. And so for me, if I treat each day like the first day and know that each room I come into, I want to change that room for the better I think I'm gonna make the people that I interact with a little better off than before. I was there, man, that's so good. That's awesome. I've got my I've got my, uh Each day equals first day wristband on having taken it off since you you gave me once. I appreciate that. And I certainly encourage everyone to maybe try on your philosophy for a bit. See how it feels, uh, do some of the deep work to try to find their own. You're right, Doctor Survey is a great resource is podcast. Finding mastery is outstanding, but I think these are all little lessons that are not complicated. You know, it's it's simple, but not easy is how I'd like to say, you know, and and great reminders for us. So I think that's a great place for us. To maybe Mike drop it for the listeners. And I'd love maybe just for a second if you could share where people confined you and connect with you and maybe ask you about what your three books are. Yeah, obviously linked in is probably the easiest. It's actually the only social media place so linked in mindset. Is everything eyes my actual? What do you call that? Not profile, Tom, but like not that you are or something. That's why you are all mindset. I don't know if there's a lot of other top shorts, but mindset is everything is mine on. Then. Lapine won a dot com. We've got some cool things that there may not makes sense for some people to check out, but yeah, Those were really the two places that you could get in touch with. I love it. Tom Short. I appreciate you coming on the show, man. I'm fired up just like I am every time that we talk. So I appreciate it. Thank you for having me. Hopefully, Hopefully the listeners got something out of this. I'm sure they did. I'm sure they did. All right, that is that. That's the end of the episode. We appreciate you listening while you're doing whatever you were doing cleaning the house, washing the car, walking the dogs, whatever it is. Thank you for listening again. Go over to Apple. If you like the show. Subscribe. And please leave a review for us five stars. It helps us to grow the show really quickly before we leave you. This episode was brought to you by six cents powered by AI and Predictive Analytics. Six cents helps you unite your entire revenue team with a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue growth. That's all you got from me for this week again. I'm Tom Alaimo until next Monday. Let's get after.

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