The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 168: Maximizing Pavilion w/ Brad Kime

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Ep 168: Maximizing Pavilion w/ Brad Kime

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome to the pavilion podcast. I am your host, Brandon Martin and you're listening to is this a good time. The show where I put pavilion members on the hot seat for 15 minutes and we hear their incredible stories, shows are out Tuesdays and Thursdays. So hit subscribe and you will not miss hearing from our experts. Our guest today is brad kim. He is the head of the new york city pavilion chapter and we talk about getting the most out of pavilion this month. Sponsor is Sandoz. So Sandoz. So the leading setting platform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey by connecting physical and digital strategies. Companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than ever before. All right, let's do this episode 83 is this a good time? All right, Everyone's super excited to have brad kind with us, brad is uh career sales professional, but as of today, he is the head of the new york city chapter at Pavilion and then going to be taken on some interesting stuff in the future. But brad is so great to have you here, man. Thank you. Excited, excited to be here today. And yes, I've been involved in the New York Tech scene for 12 years now. So definitely one of the early stage people in Silicon Alley. Beautiful. Yeah, man, Well look, we're all meat. No feller. Jump right in. Um, want to get to want to get to kind of your origin stories like you know, tell us about the experiences that you had obviously um you also obviously near to my heart you got involved in food tech by getting involved with officer but bring us back earlier than that. Sure, sure. Yes, I was working in a more traditional commercial banking and it was 2008, timeframe which for those of you who remember was a very painful time uh in particular with a deep recession and in the epicenter of that word was the...

...traditional financial services industry. So I decided it was a time I needed to reinvent myself. And so I did two things at that point in time, one of which was started a bar uh on my own and did that because I decided that bars were somewhat recession proof, not having thought through a pandemic recession. Uh and and secondly uh took a job with a startup in new york as a ceo of a company called on deck and so it was a small business lending a platform that was being built and developed. Um and and that's how I kind of reinvent myself. I got myself out of traditional into, into more of the tech startup and kind of did a side business um just as something different to do as well. Nice, nice. And so and so, you know, along the way uh you know, tell us a little bit more about, you know, had a revenue of dandy or at a observe. I mean you've been really in SAS for, for quite quite a minute. I have, yeah, I've been in, in certainly the tech growth. I've actually done six different tech growth startups. So I think one of the premises and data points that SAm Jacobs always has, that pavilion is around the tenure of people who lead revenue functions and growth organizations about 17 months I think I align with that pretty well. Um, I started um, like clearly with, with conduct that was in the small business finance space. It was a C. R. O at linke lin qi we were doing private student lending. So consumer lending private in particular in the student lending space work. MS lee with banks and credit unions there flip back into the small business space, which is really the, my stronger domain expertise and uh, ran partnerships at signpost them. I had met the, actually, the founder of observed when I was...

...working at on deck, we were both funded by first round capital was one of our major VCS. And so he and I had lunch in early 2017 and he said, I want to hire you. And I was like, Oh, I thought we were just catching up. Um, and so I went there to uh hired me to essentially restructure a channel partnership, a group that had had fallen short of some of the expectations that he had had About eight months after being there. The company upsurge got acquired by this to private equity. So I stayed on the other side, actually ran all of revenue for 2018. Uh, and we had the highest level of growth that the company ever had had experienced. You know, I certainly had a line of sight as to doing things beyond channel partnerships because I was working in the company, obviously I was also a customer. So I, um, uh, the bar and we used the observe platform in my operation. So it was, I would say easy, but there's certainly something that I knew really well and certainly made me have probably some quicker success that maybe somebody else who would have, who have taken on that role. Yeah, that's, that's great. You got to, you know, eat your own dog food as they say or whatever that is, We'll look, you know, there's, there's always these moments of really extreme kind of hard work and our luck that get us to where we are. Do you have a, you know, an anecdote from, from either of those that sounds like having that one lunch might be part of it, but, you know, that was clearly one of them. I, I find that staying in touch and building a network when you don't need, it is always important. Um, and so I've always been one of those people who have continued to stay in touch with people from my previous employers, um, whether their investors and not, and just continued to maintain a little presence, um, just because I've enjoyed them personally.

It also has helped to benefit me with different career opportunities as well. Um, but I also say with, with startups, I think, you know, there's a lot of ups and downs and I have focused on a lot of early stage startups, so A and B. Stage are typically where I play. Uh that also has, you know, an element of excitement, a lot of green space associated with building things, definitely some drama around, you know, trying to figure things out whether that's the product market fit, whether that's just the management team. And, and so I guess the other thing I've always tried to give people advice about is um, you know, stick around through those, uh some of that turbulence, there's definitely lessons you can learn. There's definitely opportunities that get created on the other side of that as well. And so I have benefited from that over time that it's been rare in uh in five of the six startups that I've been in. I have gotten uh significant expansion of my responsibilities from, from the role that I entered. And partly just because I focused on doing what I needed to do, tried to lessen a little bit of the drama into my work life. Um, And and then again, when they're looking for the next person to lead, I was fortunate to get tapped on the shoulder to expand my my role from what it previously was. Yeah, that's uh, that's great advice. And, and, you know, I, as somebody who has now gone through a couple of, you know, seed to series B, uh, you can never really underestimate how much turbulence that there actually is in those stages. It is, it is, it can be gut wrenching and like, you know, one big deal gets lost and you, you know, your team, your team loses faith and or the opposite, right? The the shot of adrenaline because we got one deal, it's like, oh man, we've been off too much here. It's uh, it's a crazy exactly, and it's, yeah, all of those.

And uh, above there's also, um, you know, I have ultimately became the ceo of on deck and there was president around the company, but I've never really found my own company. So usually I'm working with first time founders in this in particular. I think on the sales side, um, most founders have been the initial person out there on the sales front. And so I think that's great because I think getting that feedback is really important directly from customers to help you frame the product market fit and prioritization. Um, at the same time, I also find it it's hard for people to give that up. They have some, you know, they develop some thoughts about sales through that they may not have had a lot of career experience that, so I always say people get a point of view um they, what they lack oftentimes is a frame of reference. And so I think that what I, what I bring into the organization of having experienced sets of not only now six startups, but but on other things is a frame of reference around, you know, there's never one right way to do things, but there are definitely better things to do given the scenario that you face. And so I believe that I've faced a lot of different scenarios and like to believe that the organizations I work for, benefit from those experience sets to help mitigate downside risk and maximize the upside from, from all of that. For sure, for sure. Well look, I want to, I want to take this question uh this part and go to a question we normally don't go to um tell us about being a chapter head for the largest Pavilion chapter, right? New york's got to be the largest chapter, I'd imagine. Right? It is, it is, yeah. You know, Pavilion is an amazing organization and I give my friend Sam Jacobs a lot of kudos for not only initiating the idea, it was kind of doing a part time for a while, but certainly doubling down and going...

...deep on. It certainly has grown. Covid has really benefited organizations like Pavilion because people have not had as many in person professional development opportunities as they would have been able to go to a meet up or they would have been able to just network a lot more in person. And so I think Pavilion went from 1500 members to 5000 over the course of 18 months of Covid just, you know, because of the, the great product that it was offering, but also Covid certainly gave it a tailwind where people were looking for opportunities to connect with with other people. So new york is the largest chapter. Um, it is where Sam uh, has been based himself personally. It's where I have lived since 2009. I have been seeing from early days and texting. Um, and so I've been uh, involved in helping him out along the way, whether it was co hosting a dinner or breakfast or doing things. Um, and again, have found, uh, you know, the opportunities, I've met so many people who are now I call good friends, um, but people of that, I have tremendous amount of respect for within the, within the Pavilion community and that continues to grow, you know, each and every day and each and every week. And that's that's the exciting part about it because I don't think you ever get too far in your career or whatever without getting energized by meeting new energy and, and, and new, exciting bright people and unfortunate unfortunate because they sit kind of where I do it, it's being able to do that and now we're really, we're gonna be big time back on in person events in 2022. Um and so we have been starting to do those here over the last few months and and really going to, I kind of have a much more aggressive agenda around in person to try to facilitate what I continue to hear from members is, you know, all this online stuff has been great, have a little bit of zoom fatigue, you know, but but really...

...trying to, you know, um they everybody has heard stories about the networking aspect of Pavilion that really was the core of what happened in new york and um that Sam was a master at facilitating and so uh the ability to to kind of augment some of the things that he started and being able to take on a little bit of that myself has been has been great, it's just very personal rewarding to see people. And again, I have some of those experiences that I can help, especially more junior members at that associate level to provide some mentorship. I have a couple of mentors that that I that I work with mentees that I work with as a mentor. Really valuable types of things on one on one stuff, but also get reached out to a lot about just different um points in time of a piece of advice on a specific situation. Yeah, well I wonder instead of, you know, often the next question in our pot is about a tactic for sales or marketing. I wonder if you might offer something, you know, to, to people, maybe a piece of advice on, um, you know, how can they take advantage of Pavilion better than they do? Like what is, what is the one thing that you implore people to do? To get full, fully, kind of, the value out of, out of the product, so to speak? Um, yeah, I think Pavilion is an amazing array of resources. It's just incredible the amount of resources you have access to the best and brightest minds across the globe, um, to help from, to solve a problem or help maybe reinforce what you think might be the right thing to do uh, in your, in your daily work life. Um, I think the thing about the Pavilion can get in particular with the slack channels is you can get a little bit overwhelming. And so I always tell people to really try to pick the three or five topics that they either want to...

...engage in a deeper way, learn about or contribute either way and try to stay focused on that. If you look at my slack Pavilion, I've got, you know, way too many channels and I think that's where people can kind of get overwhelmed. I also think, trying to, trying to take a little bit of time, um, each and every week, um, and actually spend on it to where you're really then those 3 to 5 channels where you do try to stay up on it, blocking a half an hour of your time on a Wednesday or a friday where you can kind of delve deep into it and again, it is a pay it forward sort of thing. So it is about contributing, everybody does have useful perspectives, but it is not being able to do that. And, and again, trying to prioritize because I do it very much as a professional development community. Uh, and that's, that's super important in my career from, you know, learning a just, you know, tacit knowledge, but then, you know, be the connections that I made, see like the jobs that I've had, you know, if they haven't come from VC investors that I've known, they have at least two of the more recent ones certainly have come directly from connections that I've had through Pavilion. Nice, nice. Well look, you know, give some shout out some folks that you feel like our up and comers are folks that you follow and appreciate kind of like, you know what they put out and you learn from them. Sure, sure. You know, one of the, one of someone who used to work for me who is in the Pavilion community currently actually associated with the Denver chapter is named Jared young, uh, super talented. I had the fortunate pleasure to have Jared work for me with me. We accomplished some great things um that it's awesome to see him have the success but that he's had in his career, publishes some good content I think on, on linkedin, always good, good...

...perspectives, but you know, just kind of coming out of that associate level type of thing. Um another former colleague of mine was Ian Lazarus who was now doing his own startup, so kudos Ian um, but Ian kind of worked with me early on in the days of Alice and really helped kind of build a partner program. I think he learned a lot from, from that perspective uh love, you know everything he's bringing and wishing him nothing but great success in his new, his new startup, somebody that I just met more recently, Amy Herman who has moved to new york and in the last year, but a part of on the customer success side. And so I love Amy as, as a bright energy and I know she's got a lot of interesting things that she's going to accomplish uh in the future. So she jumped into pavilion full full lock on and and really been contributing a lot and I really, really appreciate that and I know that it will benefit her tremendously in her career in the future. Love that, love that man and look last one at least I know you love food, you love restaurants, you, you, you can't pick one that you own, you can't pick anything partner in, give us a spot that we should go check out. I mean come on, you know I'm I'm in new york and so I am I am just a gigantic fan of abc kitchen. So it's very very boujee but it's always amazing. And every time I go there I think wow this is gonna be kind of a pricey meal and every single time let's say it exceeds my expectations and with me the higher the price point that you have, the higher my expectations go. And so um I love everything about it. I think they always consistently put out amazing, amazing quality, usually kind of a who's who who's there. So you're definitely gonna see, I think one of the last times I was there Michelle Obama was there. Uh Oh it was, yeah it...

...was kind of you know it's kind of on the radar screen of of you know, some of the others, but really always a terrific option. And if you don't do abc kitchen, do abc Cotino which is next door um a little bit less price point but still amazingly quality of food. And uh I don't know anybody who's ever gone wrong in any of that place and that's always my, this might go to recommendation for even anybody out of town coming into the city that wants a great meal. I said just it's easy, it's great and you're not going to come away disappointed. Love it, we're going there, man. I'm making you take me there, We'll get the pea guacamole thing. Exactly, or whatever. Yeah, no, it's it's incredible food so well brad. Thank you so much for being on. You know, always always good to catch up and really looking forward to what's next for you. I know you got some stuff to do, so stay tuned. Yeah, it should be some a new announcement here in december about what I'm going to be doing next. So awesome. Thanks so much. Yeah. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in the Apple podcast. Spotify app sentences some friends and make sure to smash that subscribe button reminder. This episode is brought to you by Sin does. So they deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that they your outreach more personal. I have a lot of fun and I hope you do too. Now go out and crush your end of year numbers if you see some and then Mhm.

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