The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 month ago

Ep 168: Maximizing Pavilion w/ Brad Kime

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Ep 168: Maximizing Pavilion w/ Brad Kime

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome to thepavilion podcast. I am your host, Brandon Martin and you're listening tois this a good time. The show where I put pavilion members on the hot seatfor 15 minutes and we hear their incredible stories, shows are outTuesdays and Thursdays. So hit subscribe and you will not miss hearingfrom our experts. Our guest today is brad kim. He is the head of the newyork city pavilion chapter and we talk about getting the most out of pavilionthis month. Sponsor is Sandoz. So Sandoz. So the leading setting platformis the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with newways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey byconnecting physical and digital strategies. Companies can engage,acquire and retain customers easier than ever before. All right, let's dothis episode 83 is this a good time? All right, Everyone's super excited tohave brad kind with us, brad is uh career sales professional, but as oftoday, he is the head of the new york city chapter at Pavilion and then goingto be taken on some interesting stuff in the future. But brad is so great tohave you here, man. Thank you. Excited, excited to be here today. And yes, I'vebeen involved in the New York Tech scene for 12 years now. So definitelyone of the early stage people in Silicon Alley. Beautiful. Yeah, man,Well look, we're all meat. No feller. Jump right in. Um, want to get to wantto get to kind of your origin stories like you know, tell us about theexperiences that you had obviously um you also obviously near to my heart yougot involved in food tech by getting involved with officer but bring us backearlier than that. Sure, sure. Yes, I was working in a more traditionalcommercial banking and it was 2008, timeframe which for those of you whoremember was a very painful time uh in particular with a deep recession and inthe epicenter of that word was the...

...traditional financial services industry.So I decided it was a time I needed to reinvent myself. And so I did twothings at that point in time, one of which was started a bar uh on my ownand did that because I decided that bars were somewhat recession proof, nothaving thought through a pandemic recession. Uh and and secondly uh tooka job with a startup in new york as a ceo of a company called on deck and soit was a small business lending a platform that was being built anddeveloped. Um and and that's how I kind of reinvent myself. I got myself out oftraditional into, into more of the tech startup and kind of did a side businessum just as something different to do as well. Nice, nice. And so and so, you know,along the way uh you know, tell us a little bit more about, you know, had arevenue of dandy or at a observe. I mean you've been really in SAS for, forquite quite a minute. I have, yeah, I've been in, in certainly the techgrowth. I've actually done six different tech growth startups. So Ithink one of the premises and data points that SAm Jacobs always has, thatpavilion is around the tenure of people who lead revenue functions and growthorganizations about 17 months I think I align with that pretty well. Um, Istarted um, like clearly with, with conduct that was in the small businessfinance space. It was a C. R. O at linke lin qi we were doing privatestudent lending. So consumer lending private in particular in the studentlending space work. MS lee with banks and credit unions there flip back intothe small business space, which is really the, my stronger domainexpertise and uh, ran partnerships at signpost them. I had met the, actually,the founder of observed when I was...

...working at on deck, we were both fundedby first round capital was one of our major VCS. And so he and I had lunch inearly 2017 and he said, I want to hire you. And I was like, Oh, I thought wewere just catching up. Um, and so I went there to uh hired me toessentially restructure a channel partnership, a group that had hadfallen short of some of the expectations that he had had Abouteight months after being there. The company upsurge got acquired by this toprivate equity. So I stayed on the other side, actually ran all of revenuefor 2018. Uh, and we had the highest level of growth that the company everhad had experienced. You know, I certainly had a line of sight as todoing things beyond channel partnerships because I was working inthe company, obviously I was also a customer. So I, um, uh, the bar and weused the observe platform in my operation. So it was, I would say easy,but there's certainly something that I knew really well and certainly made mehave probably some quicker success that maybe somebody else who would have, whohave taken on that role. Yeah, that's, that's great. You got to, you know, eatyour own dog food as they say or whatever that is, We'll look, you know,there's, there's always these moments of really extreme kind of hard work andour luck that get us to where we are. Do you have a, you know, an anecdotefrom, from either of those that sounds like having that one lunch might bepart of it, but, you know, that was clearly one of them. I, I find thatstaying in touch and building a network when you don't need, it is alwaysimportant. Um, and so I've always been one of those people who have continuedto stay in touch with people from my previous employers, um, whether theirinvestors and not, and just continued to maintain a little presence, um, justbecause I've enjoyed them personally.

It also has helped to benefit me withdifferent career opportunities as well. Um, but I also say with, with startups,I think, you know, there's a lot of ups and downs and I have focused on a lotof early stage startups, so A and B. Stage are typically where I play. Uhthat also has, you know, an element of excitement, a lot of green spaceassociated with building things, definitely some drama around, you know,trying to figure things out whether that's the product market fit, whetherthat's just the management team. And, and so I guess the other thing I'vealways tried to give people advice about is um, you know, stick aroundthrough those, uh some of that turbulence, there's definitely lessonsyou can learn. There's definitely opportunities that get created on theother side of that as well. And so I have benefited from that over time thatit's been rare in uh in five of the six startups that I've been in. I havegotten uh significant expansion of my responsibilities from, from the rolethat I entered. And partly just because I focused on doing what I needed to do,tried to lessen a little bit of the drama into my work life. Um, And andthen again, when they're looking for the next person to lead, I wasfortunate to get tapped on the shoulder to expand my my role from what itpreviously was. Yeah, that's uh, that's great advice. And, and, you know, I, assomebody who has now gone through a couple of, you know, seed to series B,uh, you can never really underestimate how much turbulence that there actuallyis in those stages. It is, it is, it can be gut wrenching and like, you know,one big deal gets lost and you, you know, your team, your team loses faithand or the opposite, right? The the shot of adrenaline because we got onedeal, it's like, oh man, we've been off too much here. It's uh, it's a crazyexactly, and it's, yeah, all of those.

And uh, above there's also, um, youknow, I have ultimately became the ceo of on deck and there was presidentaround the company, but I've never really found my own company. So usuallyI'm working with first time founders in this in particular. I think on thesales side, um, most founders have been the initial person out there on thesales front. And so I think that's great because I think getting thatfeedback is really important directly from customers to help you frame theproduct market fit and prioritization. Um, at the same time, I also find itit's hard for people to give that up. They have some, you know, they developsome thoughts about sales through that they may not have had a lot of careerexperience that, so I always say people get a point of view um they, what theylack oftentimes is a frame of reference. And so I think that what I, what Ibring into the organization of having experienced sets of not only now sixstartups, but but on other things is a frame of reference around, you know,there's never one right way to do things, but there are definitely betterthings to do given the scenario that you face. And so I believe that I'vefaced a lot of different scenarios and like to believe that the organizationsI work for, benefit from those experience sets to help mitigatedownside risk and maximize the upside from, from all of that. For sure, forsure. Well look, I want to, I want to take this question uh this part and goto a question we normally don't go to um tell us about being a chapter headfor the largest Pavilion chapter, right? New york's got to be the largestchapter, I'd imagine. Right? It is, it is, yeah. You know, Pavilion is anamazing organization and I give my friend Sam Jacobs a lot of kudos fornot only initiating the idea, it was kind of doing a part time for a while,but certainly doubling down and going...

...deep on. It certainly has grown. Covidhas really benefited organizations like Pavilion because people have not had asmany in person professional development opportunities as they would have beenable to go to a meet up or they would have been able to just network a lotmore in person. And so I think Pavilion went from 1500 members to 5000 over thecourse of 18 months of Covid just, you know, because of the, the great productthat it was offering, but also Covid certainly gave it a tailwind wherepeople were looking for opportunities to connect with with other people. Sonew york is the largest chapter. Um, it is where Sam uh, has been based himselfpersonally. It's where I have lived since 2009. I have been seeing fromearly days and texting. Um, and so I've been uh, involved in helping him outalong the way, whether it was co hosting a dinner or breakfast or doingthings. Um, and again, have found, uh, you know, the opportunities, I've metso many people who are now I call good friends, um, but people of that, I havetremendous amount of respect for within the, within the Pavilion community andthat continues to grow, you know, each and every day and each and every week.And that's that's the exciting part about it because I don't think you everget too far in your career or whatever without getting energized by meetingnew energy and, and, and new, exciting bright people and unfortunateunfortunate because they sit kind of where I do it, it's being able to dothat and now we're really, we're gonna be big time back on in person events in2022. Um and so we have been starting to do those here over the last fewmonths and and really going to, I kind of have a much more aggressive agendaaround in person to try to facilitate what I continue to hear from members is,you know, all this online stuff has been great, have a little bit of zoomfatigue, you know, but but really...

...trying to, you know, um they everybodyhas heard stories about the networking aspect of Pavilion that really was thecore of what happened in new york and um that Sam was a master atfacilitating and so uh the ability to to kind of augment some of the thingsthat he started and being able to take on a little bit of that myself has beenhas been great, it's just very personal rewarding to see people. And again, Ihave some of those experiences that I can help, especially more juniormembers at that associate level to provide some mentorship. I have acouple of mentors that that I that I work with mentees that I work with as amentor. Really valuable types of things on one on one stuff, but also getreached out to a lot about just different um points in time of a pieceof advice on a specific situation. Yeah, well I wonder instead of, youknow, often the next question in our pot is about a tactic for sales ormarketing. I wonder if you might offer something, you know, to, to people,maybe a piece of advice on, um, you know, how can they take advantage ofPavilion better than they do? Like what is, what is the one thing that youimplore people to do? To get full, fully, kind of, the value out of, outof the product, so to speak? Um, yeah, I think Pavilion is an amazing array ofresources. It's just incredible the amount of resources you have access tothe best and brightest minds across the globe, um, to help from, to solve aproblem or help maybe reinforce what you think might be the right thing todo uh, in your, in your daily work life. Um, I think the thing about thePavilion can get in particular with the slack channels is you can get a littlebit overwhelming. And so I always tell people to really try to pick the threeor five topics that they either want to...

...engage in a deeper way, learn about orcontribute either way and try to stay focused on that. If you look at myslack Pavilion, I've got, you know, way too many channels and I think that'swhere people can kind of get overwhelmed. I also think, trying to,trying to take a little bit of time, um, each and every week, um, and actuallyspend on it to where you're really then those 3 to 5 channels where you do tryto stay up on it, blocking a half an hour of your time on a Wednesday or afriday where you can kind of delve deep into it and again, it is a pay itforward sort of thing. So it is about contributing, everybody does haveuseful perspectives, but it is not being able to do that. And, and again,trying to prioritize because I do it very much as a professional developmentcommunity. Uh, and that's, that's super important in my career from, you know,learning a just, you know, tacit knowledge, but then, you know, be theconnections that I made, see like the jobs that I've had, you know, if theyhaven't come from VC investors that I've known, they have at least two ofthe more recent ones certainly have come directly from connections thatI've had through Pavilion. Nice, nice. Well look, you know, give some shoutout some folks that you feel like our up and comers are folks that you followand appreciate kind of like, you know what they put out and you learn fromthem. Sure, sure. You know, one of the, oneof someone who used to work for me who is in the Pavilion community currentlyactually associated with the Denver chapter is named Jared young, uh, supertalented. I had the fortunate pleasure to have Jared work for me with me. Weaccomplished some great things um that it's awesome to see him have thesuccess but that he's had in his career, publishes some good content I think on,on linkedin, always good, good...

...perspectives, but you know, just kindof coming out of that associate level type of thing. Um another formercolleague of mine was Ian Lazarus who was now doing his own startup, so kudosIan um, but Ian kind of worked with me early on in the days of Alice andreally helped kind of build a partner program. I think he learned a lot from,from that perspective uh love, you know everything he's bringing and wishinghim nothing but great success in his new, his new startup, somebody that Ijust met more recently, Amy Herman who has moved to new york and in the lastyear, but a part of on the customer success side. And so I love Amy as, asa bright energy and I know she's got a lot of interesting things that she'sgoing to accomplish uh in the future. So she jumped into pavilion full fulllock on and and really been contributing a lot and I really, reallyappreciate that and I know that it will benefit her tremendously in her careerin the future. Love that, love that man and look last one at least I know youlove food, you love restaurants, you, you, you can't pick one that you own,you can't pick anything partner in, give us a spot that we should go checkout. I mean come on, you know I'm I'm in new york and so I am I am just agigantic fan of abc kitchen. So it's very very boujee but it's alwaysamazing. And every time I go there I think wow this is gonna be kind of apricey meal and every single time let's say it exceeds my expectations and withme the higher the price point that you have, the higher my expectations go.And so um I love everything about it. I think they always consistently put outamazing, amazing quality, usually kind of a who's who who's there. So you'redefinitely gonna see, I think one of the last times I was there MichelleObama was there. Uh Oh it was, yeah it...

...was kind of you know it's kind of onthe radar screen of of you know, some of the others, but really always aterrific option. And if you don't do abc kitchen, do abc Cotino which isnext door um a little bit less price point but still amazingly quality offood. And uh I don't know anybody who's ever gone wrong in any of that placeand that's always my, this might go to recommendation for even anybody out oftown coming into the city that wants a great meal. I said just it's easy, it'sgreat and you're not going to come away disappointed. Love it, we're goingthere, man. I'm making you take me there, We'll get the pea guacamolething. Exactly, or whatever. Yeah, no, it's it's incredible food so well brad.Thank you so much for being on. You know, always always good to catch upand really looking forward to what's next for you. I know you got some stuffto do, so stay tuned. Yeah, it should be some a new announcement here indecember about what I'm going to be doing next. So awesome. Thanks so much.Yeah. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you lovethe show, please rate and review in the Apple podcast. Spotify app sentencessome friends and make sure to smash that subscribe button reminder. Thisepisode is brought to you by Sin does. So they deliver modern direct mail,personalized gifts and other physical impressions that they your outreachmore personal. I have a lot of fun and I hope you do too. Now go out and crushyour end of year numbers if you see some and then Mhm.

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