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Ep 72: Lorena Morales' Immigrant Story w/ Lorena Morales

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Ep 72: Lorena Morales' Immigrant Story w/ Lorena Morales

Part of the "Thank God it's Monday!" series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Alright, everybody. Welcome back to another episode of the Revenue Collective podcast. This is your host Tom Alamo. They call me Tommy Tahoe, excited that it's monday and we're here again with another episode. This is where we help revenue leaders to give them the skills, the strategies that they need to be successful in today's age in the B two B world. Before we get to today's episode, I want to give a quick shout out to our sponsor. This episode is brought to you by quota Path, commission tracking software built for sales operations, finance and accounting teams. If running commissions and payroll has you running for the hills, quota path is for you quote a path, helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay their teams accurately. And on time every time, keep your team motivated and non target. Simplify your commissions at quota path dot com slash revenue dash collective and give your reps the gift of transparency. For today's episode, I've got a conversation interview with Lorena Morales. Llerena is the VP of marketing over at God nimbly. She's been there for for just about three years now. Has stakes in a bunch of different things from Forbes to revenue collective, to the women in revenue, all over the place as a ton of experience and a bunch of different industries. It is an immigrant to Mexico and we talk about her immigration story, which is super inspiring. We talk about how she views time in a very interesting way, Some of the different marketing tactics that go nimbly is using right now that you might be able to learn from as well. So I really love this conversation with Lorena. I think you will to uh if you do give us a shout on linkedin and please head over to Apple to subscribe and leave a five star review for the show. Without further ado, let's get into my conversation with Lorena Morales. Alright. Lorena Morales. Good evening. Welcome to the Revenue Collective podcast. How are you? I tell me it's so nice to be finally here. I have joined the community a long time ago and I think I admire every single member that I have the opportunity to not only meeting person back then, but now a lot of interactions happening. Of course it is lack. So yeah, what a what a valuable community out there for. Sure, yeah. How long have you been a member for? I want to see a little more than two years. So yeah, I initially met SAM back in SAN Diego. Beautiful event from outreach back then. Beautiful weather, beautiful city, everything was perfect. So yeah, nice, nice. You're probably one of the uh, one of the originals then if it was two years ago, he might have started maybe three or four. But I, I didn't even know it existed until earlier last year. So you got in early. I did yeah. The san Francisco chapter we were I believe hash like we were like six people the most uh now my understanding that the SAn Francisco chapter is probably the second biggest one, something like that. But yeah, I was an early adopter. Yeah, that's awesome. And I always like to ask during the pandemic, are you out in san Francisco or you elsewhere traveling or where have you been stationed? I know right. Everyone decided to go back to their parents stopping rent and do the smart. Unfortunately I I am an immigrant so I didn't have that chance. I I am one of the san Francisco survivors. So I stayed here uh maintain the city as good as I could and uh yeah, so enjoying it. I have to be honest, the city's kind of empty some base, some others, the traffic is getting back. But yeah, I fell in love with san Francisco and I don't seem to ever go back. Yeah, yeah, I'm here to I'm holding down the city with you as well. That's how many good people and good. It's my Yeah, absolutely, absolutely.

So you mentioned being an immigrant, that's the perfect place where I wanted to start this conversation, learn more about, you know, your immigrant story in coming to american and what that was like. I'd love to hear the background there. Yeah. Oh tom that that's kind of odd or actually no, I I don't think it's it's difficult anymore. I opened this story probably around a year and a half ago when I when I know around a year ago when I finished my first book, it's a topic that I didn't want to share with the people because I feel that a lot of the aspects of the Latina, the Latinas community is based on like it it's not married based and it's more on all the cliche of the mexican coming to the U. S. And then you grew and uh and for me it was just painful right? Because I have experienced the good, the bad and the ugly. And so when I grow the book I started to kind of go back to all the memories that somehow my brain blocked and that's how incredible the human brain is, the moment that you don't wanna carry, but things it just blocks it. And so when I was in the integrating process I started to understand like wow then I've been through a lot of things and I think people should should hear about it. So long story short I've been here in the bay Area for around eight years. I spent a little bit more than a year in New York. And so I am Mexican born and raised in Mexico. I lived in a couple of countries in latin America and before deciding to come to the U. S. I understood that my hometown was not living by design. Mexico was not a country were design or like local designers were valued. Now it's an entirely different story but back then it was very difficult for me to to explain to people industrial design or product design. And so I said how can I make sure that I understand the other side of day of the coin? How do I saw things? That's when I came to the U. S. And I invested a lot of time of my life doing to graduate degrees. I became almost a specialist. And then soon enough I saw that for companies is really really hard to invest in immigrants because it's a bit right. It's a raffle literally is sponsoring a specialized visa. It's a ruffle. Even if you put the money, even if you put the lawyers, even if you put all the papers in time and place, there's still a good chance that the application is not going to go through. And that was a really kind of both a heavy thing for me to carry because I was always depending on a Visa trying to go or move to the industries that that I loved without really having a chance. But that turned out to be a good thing and that's where all the things get better. I ended up in suss when I stopped depending on a Visa and now I am supporting other immigrants, especially mexicans. I do believe that Mexicans have this passion for work and a different understanding of what work means that now I am incentive aiding people to come to the US and stop believing the idea of the americans don't like immigrants. It's true at some degree. But on the other hand, probably some of the most beautiful people and that I called today my family, they are immigrants as well. So that's that's the story of success. Today I get to choose a company that I truly believe in. I choose an industry that moves as something. I've never experienced a hyper growth movement that happens in especially in SAAS companies and so I am here just trying to make the best out of out of marketing I guess. Yeah. Well I I want to take a moment just to applaud you on...

...making that transition and all of the I'm sure millions of different obstacles that you had to come through to to come from Mexico to the U. S. And then get the duel degree and then work your way up and go from new york to san Francisco and jump from different companies and and get to where you are. So I think I speak on behalf of everyone listening that you know your success is this really truly impressive. I'm curious more than anything else you just mentioned that you you feel that you know folks from Mexico tend to have like a different I guess belief about work, I forget the exact word that used but I'd love if you elaborate on that a little bit. I'm curious. It was super funny tom when I when I got to to san Francisco especially because new york is an entirely different base, but when I came to san Francisco for me, it was so amazing that literally everyone was at a happy hour at four p.m. No bigger, it was four thinking PM, you could see every single person, I used to be very close to the Levi's plaza for those that don't know um that place is just like literally is a plaza that the company device has right outside their headquarters here in san Francisco and there's a bar or there used to be a bar there and I'm not kidding you, like every time that I could walk out I was like, oh my God, everyone is just enjoying life and Mexico, there's this tendency where if there's work to be done, you don't leave the office until you finish. And for me it was kind of an economy because I am a segregate er by nature, I believe that the moment that you stop your computer, you stop your computer and it's something that I've been struggling with of course, especially when you are in an executive positions, there's always gonna be worth waiting for you, right? But I think ultimately, what mexicans believe is in hard work, nothing is going to commit to you. And generally the things that are easy, they are not worth it. Or at least in my experience, I got love for people to someone to come and tell me like, hey, everyone was given to me and I am enjoying life. I am gonna be friends of that person as soon as I meet them, because I need someone like that in my life. But until then, I am going to still believe that every single piece of happiness in this life need to work a lot of work behind it. Yeah, I mean, I think that's that's fundamentally true and anyone that you look up to or that you believe is successful, you know, likely had years or decades of just relentless hard work and luck and you know, a number of other things that had to fall in their favorite to get to that place. So I find that to be interesting, I can definitely relate to, you know, the san Francisco crowd of, you know, kind of maybe a little bit more relaxed than the east Coast from the East Coast myself and definitely more relaxed. It sounds like then, you know, the culture where you grew up, where it's like if there's a job like you finish it and it doesn't matter if it's four or six or midnight or takes extra weeks or whatever it might be that you're just going until the job's done, Not till you know a certain time on the clock and you just hit the nail in the heroin when you said, look, that's an aspect that I'm learning very late in my life. I'm kidding audience. I'm super young. Don't, don't believe that. But uh I am reading this book by Maria Canicoba and it's just an interesting fact for for the audience where she brought a book called the Best Bluff of fall and she talks about the fact of she she's Russian and so she also has this hardworking mentality but then she became a master player in poker even though she had like a phds in psychology. So she started to understand and analyze the factor of flock in a human's life. And so people just go and read it because it's changing my perspective of things. You're totally right. Like I'm gonna spill the beans. and the idea is it's a combination. Yes, you can control everything and you do need luck. So...

...yeah, yeah, there's um, it's kind of funny, there's a number of different poker players. I feel like that have written good books. I don't know if you're familiar with thinking and bets, which is another good one. It's just, I feel like the, there's a lot of similarities to how poker players act versus what you can take in the business world or investing world or, or things like that. I'm telling you, I'm learning a lot about life. I mean, who knows? Maybe I'm going to end up like going to Vegas and making my cash and then not sass companies anymore, but uh, but I don't know people so far, I'm just learning about life. Yeah, yeah. So you know, one thing that you mentioned earlier while you were talking about kind of your come up in America and going to school and things like that you touched on the concept of being a specialist and being a generalist. I'd love to hear, I feel like that's kind of an age old debate. Hey, should you really just get good at this one thing or even this, you know, one thing could be marketing and then it could be like This really, really niche version of, of marketing that you could be amazing at, or is it better to really understand a lot of different things to the 80%ile level that you can maybe take different disciplines and and use them in your in your work and become more well rounded. I'm curious where you stand on that life has, has put me in in different situations and I've been again lucky enough to to take every single opportunity and that that's another story because in latin America the worst thing that you can do is jumping jobs is just very frowned upon. You don't have commitment, you don't understand what is loyalty. So there's a lot of kind of reprimand against jumping jobs And I came to to the us with the idea of I'm gonna stay with the company for 10 years, 15 years and then do my own thing, that was my initial idea but they say something also like make plans and make, make, make God laugh or something like that in spanish, it sounds way better by the way, but anyway the point is don't do plans because life is going to show you better. So anyways I was here in my idea of like yeah I'm gonna join actually, the company was idea, I have to say it, yes, every single designer in the world Dreams with joining ideal. But then being headquartered in San Francisco of course I understood that I was completed with 100,000 million people that wanted to join ideal. So it didn't happen um it didn't happen. So I still believe tim cook is one of the previous minds in the space. And to your question, one of the books that changed my life and my perspective forever. It's called T shaped people and cut monkeys. And the idea of that book is precisely explaining what is T shaped people and is what you were describing on probably use specialized 80 and then the highest part of the tea is the areas where you are also dangerous for me it's not doing an 80% because as I'm telling you I had to jump not only sizes of companies but industries. So I worked in a protector and real estate. I worked in product, I worked in N. G. O. S. I worked in healthcare, in retail, you name it, I have worked in that industry and so with that slowly I became kind of the jane of all trades and my father was driving nuts by the way when he was like again lining up please no like what's what are you gonna do with your life? And I'm like take it easy, I'm gonna be okay, I'm I'm gonna find my way and san Francisco the beauty of the Bay Area is it started to value these generalists especially in leadership positions. And I think now after the world has taught us one or two lessons in 2020 most of the skills that the journalists possess in terms of managing people and understanding people tom those things are not replaceable, they are never going to be automated. And I think that's the new value of journalists, let alone the ability of, of dealing with uncertainty and ambiguity and and and all these...

...concepts that we were forced to jump into without even knowing how to deal with them. For me and my formal training in the same thinking the book, a world which by definition is that a vulnerable world is very familiar. I have put myself in so much uncomfortable or so many uncomfortable situations that at this point it's a little bit embarrassing. But that's that's what has given me the ability to say, you know what I'm gonna be okay and I'm gonna find a way and I, and I'm not scared of saying, you know what, I am really good at content, but I'm also freaking good at dimension and but I am also fantastically amazing at customer marketing and so I built my career doing every single part of the demand aeration arm. But today I am equally dangerous for example, on in understanding the sale cycles of the companies. So I think that's what defines a journalist, the thirst for learning for never settle in thinking that you are the most smart person in the, in the room. That's the biggest mistake that people can make. So when you are and you're an executive, a lot of the listeners of this podcast are, are at the exact level. I'm curious when you're hiring people, do, you tend to hire at their lower say if they're director manager entry level, you know, uh like do they tend to be also generalists or do you hire specialists for those particular parts of your business that you want? The best demand gen person, the best person for events, whatever it might be or they all generalists. I was just having these conversations in the B two B growth space or the B two B group chat. It's funny that now that I am a journalist, I am looking for specialists in some instances and this is why because I believe there is no way that you can become an effective generalist because there's a difference between knowing everything and not knowing nothing At the same time than knowing 80 would also be dangerous in 20 of of other things. And so in order to be an effective journalist, you need to understand what do you like before or what are your weaknesses And there's no other way to know those except for going on specializing so in marketing right now. I think it's a very interesting space where for example, marketing operations is becoming more strategic than ever. We've never seen the people in the systems, not only having opinions, what are executing in those opinions. And I think a lot of people that come to me for advice, my first advice could be kind of go into into either content because everyone in this life needs to tell a story. You have a story, but if it's a personal one you do have a story to share. So understand content, content is king, engagement is queen. And then going to the systems, the systems are going to give you the right keys to understand how the business is creating profit. Which which at the end is what we need. We the days where we just focus on growth just because growing the company are gone. The movers, all the big companies that are still, well actually I'm lying, I don't know if over is profitable right now, but I know they were not profitable like around three or four years. Anyone please obtain me on that information. But it was the same story about amazon about lift about every single big company they never hit profit and I think it's because the people that were training the new generations, they either stay as a specialist, which is absolutely fine. I don't have anything against people that decide they just want to be the best act. And the other reality, the other piece of the question is if you don't like people and you don't enjoy being around people dealing with people's feelings. Oh my God, time like you don't, you don't like please don't move, we're from where you are because that's only gonna be detrimental for you, for the...

...organization and for everyone. So before advising in going to be a specialist or generalist, my first advice is have awareness, go and do the work for for his introspection on yourself and that's gonna give you a lot of information. What cards to move after that. Yeah. So what I'm curious with go nimbly, I was listening to a podcast of yours from I think it was last year. So this could be outdated with Covid and everything. But you're talking about how you don't do or weren't doing at the time much at all in terms of like paid lead generation. I'm curious if that's if that's still the case or How you continued to adapt the strategy and it only share as much as you can. But the strategy going into 2021 or a quarter of the way through and any adjustments that you're making from a tactical level that any marketers might be able to pick up on. Extra brownie points for you for doing your homework. I gotta do the homework. I gotta come ready. People or people expect that. You're absolutely right. That was the case before the pandemic. However, this is where I become dangerous. I had to go back to google adwords. Yeah, not so fun. I didn't touch a google adwords in like seven years and I had to kind of get dirty again and go back to paid acquisition. So I think that's, that's a beautiful example of what I'm just describing was my intention to be again the best paid acquisition. Hell no, I am I the best paid acquisition. Oh my God, no. And I'll never be. But the business needed me to jump to that instance in order to drive through the pandemic and also not only are going in blue but in order to understand how our customers were moving as well, I needed to do some of the work that that probably I was doing at the very beginning of my career. So yeah, I love it to, to answer your question yes we are doing paid acquisition now and I am the one running a Yeah. Yeah. That's funny having to go back to square one kind of is probably a humbling, humbling experience. But maybe give you more appreciation for all the time that you had to take to learn it you know, a number of years ago when you just first got your start. Yeah. What it gave me was a lot of appreciation on prioritization more than more than a humbling and like oh I don't do the things anymore because I think I've always been adware in a certain level. I make sure that I hire the best people in the area. So I don't, I am not in the way to grow in the company along with me. But there's always that that you're gonna have to do, like there's always something that you're gonna have to do on on the side. There's always work specially marketing and you're never gonna have enough hair counts to do everything that you want to do in marketing. So I think that's that's a positive thing about the marketer. There's always space to be little where even though again, like most of my time is not on the under doing things is more on the strategic things on how do we grow revenue year over year. But yeah, it gave me that sensation on how on earth. See tom the thing is my brain is in constant translation mode. I used to speak Portuguese at some point in my life and uh and I still translated a lot of things. So for me when I think about time, first of all, that's one of my weirdest obsessions and in spanish you never use the word hey, you don't use words that are associated with money with time and in english. It's a very interesting concept and like we literally use the same words that we use for money. So if we say pay attention and you're using the same things that you use with money. I've never seen anyone in the streets giving fives or twenties of 15 or nothing. But when it, when it comes with time, which is Way more impactful for me, why we are not protecting even 15 minutes. So that's what they like going back to...

Google adwords For me it was only, Hey, you only have 24 hours and out of those eight are supposed to to be working. Do you really need to be working eight hours or you need to be working 10 or you need to be working five and you are just at your 75%. So I think that understanding of how we use the words in english brought me to the realization of there are priorities in life and you need to take care of those because time is something that you, but you can never get back. Mhm So I am also obsessed with time, I'd love to hear, I'd love maybe not to your level, I'd love to hear you talk more about it like what are there any principles that you use? Like, I don't know, some people for example never take meetings, you know or they only take one meeting a day or they block that off from, from certain days or I've heard of some people say, hey, time has such a big important part of my life, but now I go and I travel to see family once a month or I, you know, I'm working, you know, four hours a week, you know, like tim ferris's book or something like that. I'm just curious if you have any systems or rules or ways that you live or work differently because of your obsession with time. The first one is, yes, I do have no thursday's meetings. That's usually people know that if of course there's a partner that someone that is external to go in England, don't don't know my, my methodology, of course I am flexible. I am, I am not the, that that type of person either, but that's that's on on Thursdays and when it has to do with business and then on the personal side, first of all, I am very, very uh since I was very young, I got used to read the time in the military format and so I have this very annoying thing. So people if you see me, please don't show me your I watch especially because I want to change it to the military time because it creates a lot of anxiety like okay this also applies to your phone. If I see your phone and you don't have a team military time, I'm gonna change it like that, that's how weird I am. Uh people have told me can you please stop? Like I don't even for example, my sister, I'm sorry probably she's never gonna listen to this. She doesn't know exactly what I do, She still doesn't know how to read time in military, like I told her like it says 16 hours and she's like wait what? Like she still doesn't get it. But anyway, that's another story for another moment. My point is I have a collection of watches. A lot of them are very antique and they don't have the batteries or or the thing, but I need to have a watch in my race every single time to have the constant reminder of you are not getting back any minute of this moment. So you better spend it with the right people at the right time. So yeah, those are kind of two of the 11 little weird thing about me and one thing that you can actually apply to business, I absolutely recommend it. It's not easy because a lot of the times people depend on you, especially marketing is one of the departments that you are going to be dependent from other executives in order to be doing your job. It's not like I don't know I. T. Or finance where you can have a good chunk of your time working by yourself. Marketing usually you're working with at least one person in a in a daily basis. Um So yeah that's that's very interesting. And the other thing is gonna be has this this thing called K days. I had trouble with them, I don't apply them but they are very successful at the company where our c. Is so closest uh kind of uh in that time it was a room and now we make it digital and everyone jumps and they shut down slack, they shut down email, they shut down pretty much everything and you start working in the tasks that you that you are going to work that day. But with your team members and making sure that you don't have any...

...disturbances for me, I'm telling you to me it didn't work because I found myself like, oh my God, I can't like I can't be an hour without working with someone. So I would have to interrupt someone else in the Cape. It was kind of crazy. But we do, we are very conscious that going to be about time. And I think it's, it's a good thing. I think every company should start to, to paying attention to the, what I call the basics. Yeah, absolutely. One thing that I wanted to talk to you about for a few minutes was just the growth of reb ops and go nimbly seemed to be ahead of, ahead of their time in may be leading that revolution. Cause I know that you folks have been around for quite a number of years and re pops is something that I feel, you know, you see every single day now on linked in someone's talking about it or offering their advice and their two cents. I'd love to hear, just like as a marketer, how how do you establish yourself and how do you differentiate when the market seems to be so hot right now and there's a lot of different companies probably vying for people's attention and, and thoughts and and trying to kind of sway them in a different direction. Sure, I, I think revenue operations is one of the passions that I found in the sense of very soon my Ceo made sure to, to educate me as fast as he could and as, and as effective as, as he could do it because he knew that this was not just a trend or just a positive word from Silicon Valley. This was something that could effectively effectively showed you the revenue leakages that are going to happen organically as as you grow as a company and especially again in season pass when you're talking about companies that are in hyper growth mood, These things are gonna happen like your funnel is gonna have linkages. And so back in 2016 they started the business. The partners have started the business with the idea of how do we make sure that we not only break silos in the systems but also in people why sales and marketing are not communicating first of all and why do they are, do they have different KPI S even though Okay. Yes. And the realization of the only person that feels those miscommunications is a customer. And because it is true when you are talking about multi stakeholders deals and you are rallying the account through the entire funnel and the obvious handoffs are going to happen from sales from marketing to sales, from sales to customer success and so on and so on. And the customer ends up talking to seven different people in the same company. And the chances are that five out of those seven people are not even going to have the enough data to know what happened from the very beginning with that customer. So the transition revenue operations has to do, first of all with an obsession with the customer and not only with your customer, but with your customers, customers, very few companies understand this. One thing is interviewing your customers as as often as you can, but another complete different beast is talking to your customers customers to understand their obsessions. So it becomes this chain of knowledge that needs to be implemented internally. I can talk a bunch about like frameworks that we have coined and that we have right now. They are part of our intellectual property precisely not only because we were the first ones and as you said, kind of early in the space, but also tom I think the definition and the value proposition to your point on like how do we differentiate ourselves from so many companies that are also receiving massive amounts of funding is simply by staying on the execution of level. Very few companies do the work. A lot of them explain to you why do you need robots? And I feel like a lot of them are still in the stage of hey, you need robots and trying to explain the why. But at this point after four years, 5 years people don't need the way...

...anymore. People need to help show me right now what is the work stream that I am gonna need in order to make my marquitos or Salesforce and I don't know, and the and God stop Systems work together. How are you really connect Every single system when in average company in serious be serious, C is dealing with around 34-36 tools in their tool stack. That's just crazy. And it's gonna get worse because that was a marketing ops era where a lot of automation has started to happen, a lot of tools and shiny toys started to evolve and now it's kind of happening with sales. We didn't see that. But now sales operation is sales operations is having this massive growth of solutions that now imagine the thing that is going to happen Now the two stocks, we are estimating that they are going to grow at least 25 more with sales operations. So that's gonna be crazy just talking about the systems and then if you talk about companies that one they had 30 people sales team and then in one month they growth that team To 115 To 1500 to 3000-5000. Those stages are hectic because you're touching a lot on on the people that run those systems and how they communicate between each other to really make an impact to the team. So I I mean I love that revenue operations is here to stay. That's what I have to say. And uh and yeah go name please is still very happy and very lucky to have the clients that we have. Those are the clients that have maintain us as the star that we are. Yeah. And honestly thinking about the marketing and the sales tech stack just gives me a headache sometimes. Try like I'm so glad that that's not my job to try to figure out how all those systems talk to each other and work with each other and make sure you're not paying for the same thing twice and All that stuff. I mean that it's it's crazy and to your point it's it's definitely only going to grow over the next 5, 10 years, yep. Yeah, and that's that's when uh when this encouraged team or for the opportunity to become advisor, uh I had to take a data is one of those pieces, especially data stewardship. Well we don't pay enough attention, we just don't, we just think that data is going to be cleaned when the moment that we needed and that because we spent, I don't know, uh a lot of money in the new Crm, it's just gonna magically appear with all the information and all the fields and all that. Yeah, that that doesn't happen, it's still a human interaction. Your systems can be as good as you make them work for you, so Yeah, I'm very interesting times for sure. Yeah, absolutely. The last thing that I wanted to ask you is obviously we're talking on behalf of the revenue Collective podcast and you've been a member for two years. I'd love to just here. There's so many ways that the community helps people or people work with the community. I'd love to just here. If you have any examples of how you've used it to help benefit you, if it's the slack groups or the events or you know, talking to people one on one or however you use it. Any tips you have for people. I think one of the most valuable things that revenue collected brings to the table in a world where community building is a thing now, it's part of the, of the marketing engine is the events. I think if there was a vision that some had at the very beginning was I am going to deliver the freaking best content that you can ever have regardless if it's in person now digitally, whatever it is, I'm gonna still uh make sure that that happens here over a year and I was talking about this with someone that was looking to join the community and my opinion was super honest. Like yeah, you can go and be a member of a lot of...

...free communities for sure. And depends like if you're using community building for the sale cycles absolutely go for it. But the beds that revenue revenue collective for me are second to none, not only on the speakers, but also on the content that they provide. I think that's something that have differentiate RC from the very, very beginning and I can't wait to go back to two person. I have talked about this in the san Francisco chapter. I just, I want that to happen now. Like people, I am going to be fully vaccinated next week. Hopefully I am ready. I want to be the first one, inviting everyone margaritas, mescal tequila, whatever you want. I am the person. So yeah, I'm in, let's do this thing. That's awesome, that's awesome. Well I think that's something to that. That's those events scale. Well, you know, as the community has grown from wherever it was two years ago when you joined to, I mean it's got to be four or 5000 people now worldwide. So it only puts out greater events and uh there's more specific events I feel for different types of leaders or scenarios or you know different things that someone might be struggling with or working on. So that's super helpful totally. And I've seen that you have segmented now also to the operations collective etcetera. So I am very, very interested in learning more about those sub groups in the community. Haven't had the time, I apologize for that. But if anything, I am always open the Arlington. Yeah, absolutely. Lorena, this has been a blast just before you go. What's the best way folks want to connect with you? If they do want to go grab a margarita or if they just want to talk about red pops and marketing, what's the best way to do that with red bumps and marketing for sure, bringing them as calendar Tequila. That's, that's just highly appreciated. And then if you just want to talk about life and not business, I also, I am a big fan of teeth. So the best way is always if you are part of the revenue collective, please justice like me. That's a really good way for me to to interact directly. And if you are not part yet reach out Arlington. I am always available there awesome. This is a blast. I appreciate it. I appreciate your time and all the wisdom and hopefully some people will take you up on that offer. Thank you Tom. I hope that I see you in person. Reason. No. Likewise. All right. Thanks for checking out that interview of the Revenue Collective podcast. You can find more about me. I'm tom Alamo on linkedin. Feel free to add more connect, learn more about revenue collective revenue collected dot com. Give this show. Subscribe in a five star review on Apple. That's he can really help us to grow. And let's give one more shout out to our sponsor. This episode was brought to you by quota path quote. A path is the first radically transparent and to end compensation solution from sales reps to finance. Get started for free at quota path dot com slash revenue dash collected. That's it for me, enjoy your week, get after it. I'll talk to you next monday. Say something. Mhm.

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