The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 95: Joining The 1% of Salespeople w/ Lee Rozins, VP Growth at Onaroll

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining The 1% of Salespeople w/ Lee Rozins, VP Growth at Onaroll 

Part of the "Thank God It's Monday (TGIM)" hosted by Tom Alaimo.

All right, thank God it's monday. Welcome back to another episode of the Revenue Collective podcasts. Your host Tom Alamo. This is the podcast where revenue leaders come to learn the tips, the tips, the tactics strategies that you need to grow in your career, take the right steps and continue moving forward. So thanks for joining me and listening while you're cooking breakfast or while you're driving or mowing the lawn or whatever it is that you're probably multitasking with right now. Before we get to today's guest, I want to give a quick shout out to our sponsor. This episode is brought to you by drift. More than 50,000 businesses use drift to grow revenue and increased customer lifetime value faster drift, helps their customers align sales and marketing on a single platform to deliver a unified customer experience where people are free to have a conversation with a business at any time on their terms, learn more at drift dot com. Quick side note that they didn't ask me to say is that I love drift personally I've had D. C. Dave can't sell their ceo on the podcast. A few other folks that I've met there and it's a great product, great company, let's get to today's guests, I got lee. Rosen's lee is currently the VP of growth at on a roll. Before that. He was the VP of sales at cheetah, He spent just about five years at single platform before that and a few other places prior and we talk all about really his three principles that he has to be successful in sales as a leader and really just the mindset to be successful in general and I love talking with lee were very like minded, I think you're gonna really enjoy this episode. Just get straight into it. Meat and potatoes of me and lee, let's go. All right lee, Good morning, Welcome to the show. Where in the world are you in this quarantine lifestyle? I am in the Big Apple. I'm in new york. I was in san Francisco for the past three years, so I would say half of Covid has been in California, Half of Covid is now in new york. Nice. That's awesome. And that's where you're from. Right, I am, I'm from new york originally just north of the city. Okay, nice. Well, I'm excited to get into this with you. You know, we met about a year ago, I think actually through Revenue Collective, which is funny and um you know, really kind of hit it off and had a similar mindset. So there's a lot I want to get into with you today. The first is yeah, I was looking through the background of your career, just on linkedin and and saw like straight out of school, it looks like you got into some sort of like a customer service type of role and then transition to sales. So I'd love to hear like, let's bring it way back to tell me about the early days of like you just graduated college, you gotta like, did you get into that role thinking you want to get into sales or that was like the thing that you just did because you needed a job or how did you get into this crazy world? Yes. Crazy world. It is. So I actually was was in sales ever since I...

...think I entered the professional life. You know, sales titles have different names, but if you're driving revenue and trying to acquire new customers, it's all the same, right? But I think the account management name may have thrown you off there. So that being said, let me take you back a little bit. So in college my senior year I was pretty much selling this company called Job Book. Two different students at my college. The reason why I was selling it to them was because I was tasked with trying to get as many students as possible to register and create an account on. Job book. Job book is basically a job platform similar to like an E Harmony, but for jobs where students register themselves and then employers post their jobs and it would match you with jobs. It was very cool, but ultimately they needed a bunch of student ambassadors to grow the number of users. So I was one of those student ambassadors, we had around 100 of them all over the country and what I loved about it was not only was I getting great sales experience, I was trying to sell the students, but I was also promised that if I finished number one out of everybody that was doing the student ambassador role, I would actually get a job in Montreal Post College, working full time in their headquarters and it was a startup, it was very small. So my competitiveness obviously kicked in and just naturally, I think because of my parents, I'm just somebody who loves to talk and I get excited about things. So all that kind of clicked, I finished number one out of all the student ambassadors and it's kind of when I started to realize that maybe sales is my ish and it's what I should go into, although I probably had that Aha moment many years prior, which I could talk about. But long story short there, I pretty much moved to Montreal Canada directly after I graduated and that's when I started to dive right into what sales is and I was selling job book now to employers and I had no idea what I was doing, I failed over and over and over again, but it was a beautiful entry into this crazy world that you talked about which is sales and that was, that was my start. Yeah, and it, it looked like I got to touch on one thing that I saw just like, because I thought it was funny that looked like you had a stint at somewhere called like the bagel Emporium, was that like a college job? So the bagel emporium was my family run bagel shop, we had half a dozen locations. And part of the reason actually that I've been working for different tech and SAAS companies that support restaurants is because that was my life growing up, like I knew exactly what it meant to be a restaurant owner because that was my family's business. By the way, Side note, they are the most delicious bagels in the world, obviously I'm biased, but if anybody wants to challenge that, give me your address, I'll send you some bagels, they still exist today of course. But...

...you know I was exposed to an smb from a very young age, like the ins and outs, the good and the bad and I know that odds are stacked against small businesses, especially restaurant owners, you can imagine even more so the past year with this crazy climate. So I pretty much had pledged myself to work for technology companies that we're going to help them beat the odds that we're going to help them use these fun technologies to kind of like thrive, not just survive and that's kind of the path I chose instead of taking over the bagel stores. Well first of all I will give you an address because I'd love to the bank as you know, the bagels in san Francisco or in California are terrible, there's I have never had a good one, so I need to get a shipment of an East Coast bagel. You say his family owned like was it is it your parents or like an uncle or grandparents or or what was like kind of the lineage there? Yeah, my father and his brother, so they co owned about half a dozen bagel shops in Westchester County and for anybody listening, it's called the bagel emporium, you can get them shipped anywhere throughout the country. This is not an ad, but it is telling you that there's delicious bagels that can be at your front door wherever you are, that's awesome. And so like as a kid you were, you were in there, you were like, you knew everything that was going on, like you knew entrepreneurship, I'm sure there was years where they were killing it and there was years that were more challenging financially and you know, you saw probably your dad and your uncle and the whole family get in at three in the morning so that the bagels could be ready when people got their, you know, bagel and coffee at 6:00 AM and the whole grind. So I feel like that's, that's got to just set like a fundamental building block for you to want to be successful on top of that, I mean totally well said, yeah, the bagel business starts very early in the morning, but what I loved so much was just being in the bagel shops, like understanding how these machines were run behind the scenes, and most specific to sales, understanding how to communicate with people every single day because I was constantly talking to customers right and understanding what the most effective forms of communication were with them. But and obviously you know you get a lot of communication and social skills through various parts of life, but this one definitely helped refine mine a little bit more. So you have three kind of guiding principles, guiding philosophies on your linkedin. I want to spend some time talking through and this just like gets me fired up. So the first one is Uh I'll paraphrase a little bit but to be in the top 1% you have to do what 99% of people aren't willing to do what are those things. So let me let me speak to that quote first of all and kind of give you my broad belief unquote in general, because I think that anybody who is not looking at quotes and truly letting them just digest in their body and internalize and live by them is just doing...

...themselves a disservice because the most successful people in the world, regardless of the profession, right there, quoted all over the internet, Right? So just go ahead and look at their secret formulas for success. They're just not so secret anymore because they're quoted everywhere. And you can truly take pieces out from like Michael Jordan or in this case Leonardo Dicaprio, who was quoted saying that, right? And he said that if you want to be in the 1% You have to do with the other 99% are not willing to do. And if you think about it, it just makes so much sense. So your question was, you know, what are those things? I will tell you that whatever the question is that you ask me, it almost always comes back to your mind, your mentality and how you condition and your belief to allow yourself to kind of accomplish whatever you want. So there's something I preach to all of my people all the time. And it's like this, this example of 10 people, right? And I mean, you could do an example of 100 people so that we live true to this quote, right, 99% of 1%. Let's say there's a group of 100 people that is always in your shoes. Always because no matter what you are doing, you know, there's over seven billion people I think on the planet, I could get my numbers mixed up, but I think it's like that high, right? We're not that special where there isn't at least 99 other people on this planet doing exactly what we're doing at all times. Whether it's a sales call, whether it's a podcast, it does not matter because that is the case, right? You have to immediately train your mind to know that whatever the most desirable outcome is in whatever it is that you are doing, there is a group, a subset of 100 people doing this and somebody is going to get to that finish line, right? Why can't that somebody bu it should be you. It has to be you right? And just knowing that somebody will get there regardless of how difficult it looks to get to that finish line or the most desired outcome. Like believing that you can do it makes all the difference. All the difference, right? We can go into all the reasons why whether it's like tonality, confidence, right? Assuming the sale everything just results in an increased likelihood that you get what you want. But again, it starts with the belief so I could give you a million examples as to what it means to To be in the 1%, right? And it doesn't just mean making a lot of money. It means being successful, being happy, but it really starts with your mind and your attitude towards things. And if that gets right, then you're already going to be close to the 1% for sure. It's About 6 47 here in San Francisco. I'm ready to run through a wall for 10 minutes into the interview so I'm ready to go um happy to hear that the second thing that you mentioned is like is surrounding yourself with people that lift you higher. Um Right. And so to me that means two things maybe more. One is like the people that you work with, right? The people that you hire. The...

...people that you work for in that you know, community and then like your circle, right? Whether that be you know, relationship, your friends, your family, you know other people that you're associating with. Like talk to me about how you pick both of those to make sure that these are people that are gonna lift you higher in the right ways. I would imagine that anyone listening, This is something that they've heard it before. Hopefully they also embraced. But my take on it is very simple, right? We have a finite number of days on this planet. Unless you know, we start finding ways to put technology in our blood cells. We live to 500. But as of right now we don't. So because that's the case, I always like to remind myself that, You know, the 80, 90 year old Lee is going to be wishing he could turn back time to give the younger lee a lot of advice and tips and I know that that old early will always tell the younger lee to surround yourself with good people who will lift you higher, who will make you feel good about yourself, who will constantly talking a positive light, just think about the way in which you feel every single day, right? Nothing matters more than I think your happiness and the people that you're with constantly, which typically is your family and friends and the people you work with are going to, the people who affect that a great amount and in the workplace specifically, We actually, and this is a true story of my last company at Cheetah, we probably came up with like 30 of the most impactful quotes for the company that we thought we should live by and we had the entire company vote on every quote and the winning quote that got the most votes was going to be blown up on the wall like huge. And the quote, that one by a long shot by a long shot was that quote surround yourself by people who lift you higher and Oprah once said it, I don't know if she was the first, but she was definitely the one that I quoted there, shout out to Oprah. Hopefully she's listening might be great. And we threw this quote on the wall and it was like Three Michael Jordan's long. That's how big this was just funny to say like that 18ft right. Um, and every single day it reinforced this and I think it's a great action that any company can take. We're not the first company to do that. But every single day when we were coming in sales is tough, right? There's a lot of challenges that businesses face every single day, but you're always going to positively or negatively impact those around you, always right. It's just, it's literally binary. You either will make somebody feel better or you'll make somebody feel worse with your attitude with what you say with how you interact with them. And just putting that quote on the wall reminded everybody every single day the role that they played in lifting other people up and you know, there's a lot of things in life that's fulfilling, but I don't think anybody would argue with you if if you were saying the most fulfilling is making other people feel good, Like that is just to me the...

...biggest win. So yeah, that's, that's my take on in the workplace. And then with family and friends, obviously it's it's more, it's more difficult to ingrain this and people you grew up with, that your friends with your family. But I try and set the example with anybody who knows me. You ask anybody. I'm one of the most positive people they will ever meet. I always look at everything like the glass half full and grateful for everything I have. I don't talk about everything I don't have. I'm very, very motivated inspired to be a better version of myself every day. But I make people think that there is a certain way that you can perceive life and there's a certain lens you should always look through. I am a big believer that you need to be a person that allows other people to be lifted up every day. I love that. I uh I found myself in one of those typical sales slumps early last week, you know, where it's Murphy's law, anything that can go wrong will and took a step back. And I got this little sticky note on my desk here that says 30 years, not 30 days. Like don't be focused on the things that, You know, the quota that needs to get hit the deal that's gotta get close in 30 days. But what are things that are going to help you out 30 years from now and like adding value to people, you know, building your skill set, connecting with great people, trying to help them out, lift them up higher as you're saying. So I couldn't echo that anymore. And the third piece that you mentioned is turning negatives into positives, which Is a lot easier said than done. Everyone that's been in any sort of revenue role feels the peaks and the valleys, right? Especially as a leader, especially if someone has been in the restaurant industry in the last you know 15 months. I can only imagine the highs and lows. So so talk to me a little bit about when it does get things do get low, How do you stay so positive? How do you keep things going on a good course that way? Yeah, of course, if it was easy, everybody would do it right. But I think sales and life in general is a roller coaster, right? It's a it's a rollercoaster of events that kind of bring you up and bring you down, right? And it's just like this roller coaster of emotions. So being very aware is the biggest step, right? Understanding that life is going to knock you down, that sales is going to knock you down is just the biggest step in understanding that this is the expectations because it's the expectation. I am fully prepared for it. And I know that it's going to try and knock me off my course right and prevent me from getting to my finish line. But I'm just going to mentally make myself strong and what I personally do that gets me by all of the difficulties and challenges because I'm no different. Like I embrace them and I have them, like everybody else is just being very mindful that I'm very fortunate and lucky and I'm not in parts of the world where, you know, I'm starving for food, right? I'm dodging bullets like I'm very, very fortunate and so are so many people, but they don't remind themselves of that. And you know, to be honest, something I...

...went through my life, you know, I went through like a very tough divorce or I didn't, but my parents did and there was financial issues that we went through as a family. Um, when we had like a lot, like not a lot and something that my father constantly just ingrained and me and my siblings was, you just got to be grateful for everything. You have a quote that he always told us and anybody who knows me knows me by this. It's every day above ground is a great day. And it's not because like religious and I'm not super religious, it's because truly right? Think about when you are 100 years from now and you may not be on this planet anymore, how you could wish you could turn back time. Like we are in our young ripe age right now. I don't really give a shit what the challenges or obstacles are that they're coming in my way. You might have to cut that piece out because I'm alive right? Like I'm a creator of my own circumstances right now. Like I get to breathe air every single day I'm above ground. So yeah, there's gonna be plenty of negatives, but if you don't see them and aware that they're coming your way and then turn them right into positives, then truthfully you are already not going to be in the 1%. You're automatically in the 99% I promise you Leonardo, Dicaprio, Oprah, Michael Jordan, right? All these people that we will quote over and over and over again, who are the most successful ever at what they do Are in the 1% because their attitude and their and their minds got them past any negative situations that they were in in life and they immediately fought through it to put them into the 1% right. So we all go through challenges every single day. Unfortunately, my father was a very positive, optimistic person and a lot of us take after the way that we were raised from our family. So I'm very appreciative towards how he raised us, but it doesn't mean that anybody who wasn't raised that way or wasn't constantly taught that can't start now, can't start understanding what it means. Turn negatives into positives. Yeah, I love that. And I'm curious, sounds like you've had some great role models for this mindset, but if I were to guess I'd imagine that there's also some other resources, whether it's, it's books, whether it's people that you follow on Youtube or conferences or whoever it might be. I'm curious if there's been any resources like that that have been particularly impactful for your mindset that maybe you've read or that you recommend others. Check out if there early on or in a down period or something like that. Yes, I'll give you three the first is the book and the book I'm sure people have heard many times how to win friends and influence people by dale Carnegie. It's just so easy to digest. It resonates with you. It's relatable. It's all about just always thinking about what's in the head of the other person, right? Every single thing that you say, somebody is going to be interpreting it. And if you can find ways like psycho on a one to understand how they're going to interpret things and how it's going to...

...either keep you on your straight line to sales town or to desired outcome or or come and get you off of it. Then you always know exactly what you should say and how you should say it. And dale Carnegie just has such a strong perspective on, so that's an easy book that anybody can read over and over and over again. I always reference it. Then there's two videos that I show to every sales person that I've ever trained and they were once showed to me and I'm so grateful that they were the first is a video on my man will smith will smith has a very specific attitude towards life And it's incredible. The dude, like I've been talking to the past 20 minutes so far just is very positive. He wants to make a great change and he wants anybody who comes into contact with to just be better because they met, right? And it's, it's really special. It's about like a 10 minute Youtube clip. If you just type in like will smith life perspective, I'm sure it will pop up and you watch that every single day, if that's what it means for you to start adjusting your behavior and your beliefs. The dude really has quite the perspective on life and it's part of the reason why again, he is one of the most successful people out there in the entertainment world. You could probably also substitute that for the rock, Dwayne the rock johnson, you probably know everyone then budgets in Iraq, You know the last one is this great Ted talk by somebody named Sean anchor and he talks about the happiness advantage. Okay, so you can see the theme here is all about the attitude and the mindset, right? You condition your mindset, everything is easy, everything is easy. So that's why I focus on that so much right. Don't believe me, go and see what Tony Robbins preaches and why he's so successful, what he does. But sean anchors ted talk about the happiness advantage ultimately talks about how society is just following this backwards formula where I work very hard, I'll be successful and if I'm successful then I'll be very, very happy, right? And obviously it's backwards because happiness is at the very end and he focuses so much on if you are very happy. But if you if you find ways to be appreciative and grateful and just think about all the good in life right? Naturally and organically it's going to make you work harder And then you will find success. But the difference is you find happiness right away and it increases the likelihood that success comes much quicker rather than the other way around. So he's got about a 12 or 13 minutes TED talk, which he just does an amazing job getting his points across, right. He backs it by a lot of science and data. It's a funny video, but he has one of the most impactful 13 minutes on anybody's life when when they go ahead and they watched that show too. Not just my coworkers, my friends and family as well. So I would go with those three to start if anybody wants to quickly start thinking about how to condition that mindset. I love that. And I haven't seen that ted talk, but there's kind of this philosophy or...

...this thought that most people that listen to this that are, you know, executives at high tech growth companies. I've probably had a lot of success, right? And it's like we want to climb the mountain and it's like, oh, once we get that VP job, once we get that round of funding, once we go public whatever, then we're going to be happy and then we hit that and then we want the next thing and then we want the next thing and there's nothing wrong with wine to go from mountain to mountain two mountain. But if you're delaying your happiness Because of that, then I imagine that you could end up pretty miserable after doing that for 20 or 30 years. But to your point, if you're, if you're already feeling good inside and that's what's driving you further, it just seems like a much more sustainable way to keep grinding and keep working hard because your whole life value isn't predicated on this goal, it's like you're already good and that's what helps you reach the goal. Yeah, Well said it's a fine balance, right? I do encourage anybody. You always want more because it keeps you inspired and motivated, but at the same time, right? Just think about the alternatives in life, think about how worse everything can always be because it could always be worse. Right? Again, you could be on your on your deathbed, that sounds intense, but that could be the case, right? But it's not for most people. So that's why I always try and take a step back and just live in the moment and love life and think about everything that is good because We don't have to talk about all the negativity that is in this world right now. Just put the news on, you'll see it every single day. It's difficult to do. But again, you want to talk about the 1%. They find ways to get themselves there. Tell me a little bit about what's going on in the new gig you started at as VP of growth at at on a roll last december kicking off this year. Tell me a little bit about what's going on there for sure. So, um, on a roll, let me just clarify the name because some people think of like honor roll, like in college or your classes, but I like to say on a roll, like how I enjoy my bacon, egg and cheese. Okay, that is, that, that is how we talk about on a roll. O N A R O L L. But ultimately what honor roll is, is it's this first of its kind Gamification platform for shift workers, whether it's restaurants, shift workers, whether it's cleaning people could be manufacturing shift workers and ultimately every single day instead of somebody just clocking in and clocking out and getting a paycheck, Honorable allows them to earn points for doing all aspects of the job, whether it's showing up on time selling a combo meal, right, answering a trivia question about the company, correct and then they earn enough points to them. Redeem for very sweet and real rewards like netflix, Spotify, Footlocker, crate and barrel, etcetera. And we just see, you know, huge improvements with respect to retention of employees, their engagement and happiness go up. They sell a lot more high margin items,...

...sales goes up and they also boost recruitment efforts. So it's just um, it's been a lot of fun. We have such a great team that is behind on a roll right now Were exploding, were growing over 500% right now, quarter over quarter. A lot of fun brands are popping onboard the rocket ship and I'm, you know, I've been here for about 56 months now and I could not be happier to be an honorable. So as someone that has spent the majority of his career as like a sail specific title now you're in a growth title. So can you walk me through the distinction there? Like what other responsibilities are you doing or how is this a little bit different maybe than what you're doing at cheetah and and some past roles. I don't think it really is that much different. I just think it's a name, right? You know anybody who is is in the sales world knows that there's a million names that mean the exact same thing. Right at the end of the day you're really trying to drive revenue. Growth is just I think a more modern way of saying sales. But if you think about additional responsibilities, our customers, they do start with X number of locations or team members to use on a roll and there's a lot of work that goes in to ensure that we could then bring on board the rest right, showing the data that gives them the R. O. I. And I think growth really encompasses full penetration of those customers, but I wouldn't look too much into it. I think sales and growth is is typically the same. So I'm curious like you're selling in this market and I imagine a lot of your customers are in the restaurant business, maybe not exclusively, but a decent chunk. Is that fair? It is fair to assume it is. So like I'm curious from a salesperson, you know, I've never sold into an industry that has just kind of been, you know smashed. Like the restaurant industry has been for the most part in the last 12, 15 months. Like how has that been like trying to kind of reframe the mindset from going of like hey we just need to keep the doors open, which is very legit too. Look, this is actually, it could be a growth lever for us to recruit better people to have more retention, to have a better experience, to sell more high margin items, you kind of have to reframe their mindset from this, like playing defense to playing offense. That's just an assumption in mind. Do you have that are those types of conversations you're having with a lot of businesses right now? Absolutely. I love that mindset and I think it's definitely the right one. There's a lot of business owners out there who need to be innovative, right? They need to think in ways that they never have before and embrace new technologies and solutions and enablement tools that make their business better because this is an unprecedented time where your existing playbook will most likely not work, right? And whether it's like you're fine dining, sit down restaurant, which...

...by the way, those ones have obviously been impacted the most with Covid or it's your quick service restaurant which those ones have been impacted the least. You know, the burger kings, the Mcdonald's like to be honest, there actually killing it during the last year, everybody has to understand that there's new challenges, I would say the most common challenge that any restaurant specifically is facing right now is around their staff and hiring and retaining them. There's a lot of unemployment checks out there that are now competing with not just retaining employees, but hiring new ones as the volume starts to pick back up. So when you, when you talk to a lot of these people, it's again, understanding immediately what the challenges are that they're going through tailoring your product or your service to those challenges to show them that their future will be better with your product or service. But I will definitely say that, yeah, navigating the restaurant vertical waters is very difficult during this time. But fortunately for us, we have narrowed in on the segment that is more quick service and fast casual because we know that they have actually thrived during Covid, but obviously, you know, if you want to dive into the other verticals or the other segments of this vertical, I should say, which are fine dining and sit down. They're the ones who need more creative solutions than they ever have to kind of get out of this mess. So both ways there is hope that you will be able to sell into them. Obviously if you truly and genuinely believe that your product or service will make their lives better if you don't, then it's tough to obviously do your job. But yeah, that's that's been my take on it again. We talked to other verticals as well because when you think about gamifying work for shift workers, it really just goes across the board. If somebody is in manufacturing and you look at efficiency times or accuracy and picks, right, you can measure anything, you can turn it into a game and every single day is a competition or contest where people feel like they want to earn points, right? Because naturally a lot of people are competitive and naturally they want to have sweet rewards and perks, that's just the way that we work. So it's not going to tangent there, it's fun exploring all different types of verticals where some of my previous companies and the technologies that I sold were a little bit more focused on restaurants, yep. The last topic I want to bring up here before we head off is just around networking. You know, we met about a year ago through Revenue Collective. I was looking for a new job opportunities, I think I just hit you up and I don't even remember what I said, but we got on a call and really kind of hit it off straight away, so I'd love to hear one what your take is on revenue Collective, like how you use it just because there's so many use cases for it that people use like one on one connections or you know, the slack channel or events or whatever it might be. And then just like if you do have any networking tips just in general philosophies, I know we mentioned surrounding yourself with great people, but if there's anything...

...else that comes to mind, would love to hear on both those. Sure, so with revenue Collective, I think it's obviously one of the most incredible communities of sales and growth people that exists, right? If you ever need support, you kind of want to like find a sounding board for ideas or in my case a lot of the time I like to look at it for benchmarking certain. Com plans or ideas for for a growing revenue, right? It's just you've got some of the brightest and smartest minds that are documenting a lot of things that are working and just you you learn from it and I think every single day anybody in any position show is trying to be learning new things. Revenue Collective is one of those, those ways that you can very easily learn something that is very specific to the world that you're in. So I love that with respect to networking and finding new people that you want to obviously surround yourself with. Obviously, you know, my take on who you should find yourself with already. So if you can find positive people who are going to lift you higher and give you great advice, that's got to be the way forward. But there's a take that I have on the Senate's that so many people do not network do not reach out. Like you are a great example of somebody who did and us, right. You and I just, because you reached out to me, I want to have a conversation, like we had a conversation and hopefully you learn something, I learned something from talking to you, right? And I think it's the people in life were proactive for the go getters who just explore the networking channel. You'll find a lot of people who are very happy and excited to talk to you because they're under the mindset that hey, I could teach this person something or hey, I can be like, will smith and positively impact or influence them. So to not go down the rabbit hole, it's just be proactive, right? Find different channels, go on linkedin message people. Like if you're a salesperson, you already know what it means to hunt and to go after food, right? It doesn't, it's not any different if you want a network, but eventually you'll have a few people that bite that you can talk to. You can learn from connections start from there, but do not discount connections because clearly it opens up a lot of doors, whether it's job opportunities, additional, you know, growth revenue channels, podcast guest, podcast guest. Exactly lee this is a blast man. I love everything that you're saying appreciate you being so generous with your thoughts with, with your time this Morning. Two last things One, just anything that we didn't touch on that is burning top of mind that, that you know, you wanted to share before we head off and then obviously where can people connect with you or learn more about on a roll? Sure. I think that you asked great questions. You, you touched on a lot of things that I wanted to talk to. So I think we're definitely golden there, but people want to talk to me, they can always just reach out to me on linkedin. They can pop on my website, lee raisins dot com and just shoot me an email with my email on there. Any which way. Or they could just reach out to you on this podcast and ask for my email. But I'm happy to...

...talk to anybody whenever they'd like, I will be the middleman between the audience and you. You guys can hit me up on linkedin and only The top 1% will pass on to your email. That is the perfect way to come full circle, my man, love that, appreciate it. Lee. Thanks for coming on. All right. Thanks for tuning in. Hope you enjoyed my conversation with lee. You could always connect with me on linkedin. My name's Tom Alamo. Let's give one more quick shout out to our sponsor before we head off for the day. This episode was brought to you by drift. The new way businesses by from businesses. You can learn more and get the conversation started at drift dot com. That's it for me today. Get after it. This week, we'll be back with another episode. Next monday piece. Say something. Mhm.

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