The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 11 months ago

Ep 170: Join a Startup w/ Dave Greenberger

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 170: Join a Startup w/ Dave Greenberger

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon Barton and you are listening to, Is this a good time show where I put Pavilion members on the hot seat for 15 minutes, we hear they're awesome stories and it's a lot of fun shows around Tuesday, thursday. So hit subscribe. Please do not miss hearing from our experts. Today's guest is Dave Greenberger. He's the VP of Sales a check and we talk about um Men O. G. Pavilion. We talk about having a career in Silicon Valley. Um he's just one of the great sales leaders in new york this month, sponsors Sandoz. So Sandoz, so the leading sending platform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage in strategic points throughout the customer journey by connecting digital and physical strategies company can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than ever before. All right, let's do this episode 84. This is a good time here. Alright, everyone, we got Dave Greenberger with us. He's the VP of sales north America at check. So excited to have you on Dave, what's happening one of the original O. G. Members of the, you know, formerly known as Revenue Collective Pavilion. Uh No. Uh no filler here. All meat, no filler. We jump right in. Dave tell us a little bit about your, you know, your path to getting to where you are today. Uh you know, start, start early and bring us along on the journey. Uh There's only early, I guess I thought for sure I would be a guy that's running his own business and if I wasn't going to do that then I was definitely going to go finance world in Wall Street. Um And I graduated not that long ago, I remember not being in my finance class with a bunch of my finance friends and towards the end of the year and looking at the T. V. On the bar and seeing bear stearns go under. I realized about a day after that that I was not getting a job in...

...finance. Um And I ended up you know stumbling into new york city. I stumbled in with these guys that were 15 people working out of a dance studio in Columbus Circle. Um and I talked to him, I really liked them. I told him this is interesting but you know I don't want to be a salesperson so uh let's get in. Uh they said no problem, we just want to write people on the bus came in, I was there like third salesperson of course and you know fast for everyone. Yeah that was a company called yaks that ended up, you know I. P. O ng I don't know eight or nine years later. Um So I got pretty lucky right place right time and the rest has been history and now I'm on my fifth startup now and realize that you can get all the upside running a sales team as you could anywhere else if you own your own business and don't have to take quite as much risk. So I've actually really liked it and so, I mean next yes, there's like an alumni group of, yes, it might as well have been like HBs, like there's so many people who have come out of that uh york is somebody who would come out like who are some of the people that you were working with at the time, because I mean it's kind of like the paypal mafia the next month. So Adam Lehman was the guy that I started next to, you know, built single platform and has done a bunch of things since then, Jt Levine is the VP at chart hop, who also like brian Rakowski was our, was our boss at the time who is kind of the godfather? Uh no, a stern man napolitano, all these guys, they're all over the uh all over the map now, Adam Kaplan's like a vandal or something close to that now,...

...it's crazy. So, so what it's like to give people a sense those that are thinking of, like maybe they're in like a late stage company and they're like, you know, should I go do something early, give people a sense of like, what, what did that do for your career in terms of, not just the skills that you learned, but the network of people to co and like bounce ideas off of and here opportunities from and so forth, it was unreal, you know it was they say that doing a startup is the hardest thing that you never want to do again. Uh and I think that's probably true even though I'm on my 5th 1 now um it was so hard you know when I first started it was like I remember going and sitting on a rock in Central Park every day which was right across from the office and just being like I'm not gonna quit, I'm not gonna I'm not gonna quit, it was just really really tough. We were cold calling you know I had to make three sales a day, 100 and 50,000 day. One of the one of those type of jobs really early on and you know I finally ended up just figuring it out and being there and having to just work so hard and it was so competitive and there were so many smart people in the room that we're figuring things out. You know I later found that that when I go somewhere you know my 60% is everyone else is 100% and that's really really valuable you know which is I feel that way about people that I've worked with that that started in I banking or something like that, like a really really hard job at the beginning but I also tell my guys that that come in now you know a check, we're going extremely fast and these people that are coming in entry level, it's like getting your MBA. And I think it's better than getting your NBA. Being able to watch a business from, you know, 40 people or 100 people or whatever it is and grow into the marketing or is 40 or 50 people or 100 people. You can really understand what's happening, You can understand like how that organism works and you can start to even put together why the ford marketing...

...organization operates the way they do. Uh, So, you know, I think it's one of the best things you can ever do for your career, let alone all the great people that are going to work with. You have to be an a plus player to kind of withstand that, that type of intense growth. Yeah, It's an interesting moment right now because, you know, the great resignation and people moving jobs and I see a lot of, you know, people coming to me for advice and they're saying I want to go to a startup, but I, you know, I don't, I'm not, I don't know if I'm willing to take the pay cut, right? Like because oftentimes that's the case, right? And um, a lot of times I'm, you know, my advice to people depending on if they want to kind of switch modes, right? If they want to go from big company to understanding what a start up is. Like you've got to take that that risk, that risk of, you know, and you bet on yourself, if you will, especially if it's a sales role where you're going to go in, figure it out and start up to give you a leash, I mean they give you enough time to figure it out, most of the time you got a bet on yourself, and you also have to bet on the, I think the team that you're joining, because a lot of startups don't don't work also, um but if you can vet that properly and you happen to hit it right, and you hit a company that's going through extreme growth, I don't think there's anything better you can do for your career to learn to, to meet people, I think it's amazing. Well, look, luck is a thing that plays into this, as well as hard work, I mean, I wonder if there's any moment in your career where you were like, damn, that was just like a break, that um you know, that was, you know, great for me, or I just happened to get to work for this person or with this person, I think every moment in my career is luck, you know, uh famously actually are found out, you could always say you create your own luck, right, You know, luck is just a combination of being prepared for when the right time comes around, I can't say that's always been the case, but, you know, I just told, you I stumbled into a 15 person company that ended up being At, when it, when it...

...happened, one of the largest Ipo's in New York and it was in 2000 and it was before really startups were startup before new york was Silicon Alley, so to speak. Um that's the luckiest thing that could've ever happened. You know, those guys that I worked with are some of the best execute, executing people I could ever imagine and the fact that I get away from him, the more I realized that and I was a right hand man to the founders, I was running 100 person sales team when I was like 23 years old that is as lucky as you can get. But I mean I also got it because I hung and I could outperform and I, you know when that came along I did everything, I possibly could to stay on the rocking bronco if you will and you know, it was a life changing thing for me and you know, since then that's put me in new and new and new positions every time. Um, and I've been really lucky to just get those roles and then there's no such thing as luck once you have a role like that, like you need to make sure that you're performing to stay on for sure for sure and that obviously landed you with check, why don't you tell people a little bit about about the company and what your check is a really interesting company. So it's a bunch of cybersecurity guys. The reason I swore off ever going back to a series B there was no way I was going to do it even though all the upside. Um and I happened to just get really enamored with these guys. It's an executive team that's all really been there, done that before, which makes to meet all the difference in the world. Um and their cybersecurity guys, but they're bringing cybersecurity over to the business side of the house. So the core thesis is that cybersecurity products that go into A C. So typically don't care all that much about what happens in the business. And it can really hurt of marketers reach or you know, their their ability to do what they do best because it just hampers them. And so we...

...take, we have a whole suite of products that takes it from the marketers lens like I don't know, maybe you're paying a couple of 10 $2050 million in in google and paid search and maybe 3% 4% 5% of that is invalid traffic. We help you see that so you can get it back and make sure you're not wasting your budget, Make sure you're not having like 30% of your organic traffic flooding your analytics. It's a really interesting concept and it's been just growing like crazy since I joined a year and a half ago and who you guys were selling to the CMOS. Um, so you know, we go up and down the defense, we acquired a business that's all very Smb uh and then, you know, we sell to some of the largest banks, healthcare retailers in the world, wow, wow. So up and down. So look, I mean, I'm sure, I'm sure you have a ton of these along the way, you've done smb, you've done enterprise like what are some, what's like one tactic that you would say people can just put into their, their, you know, uh their their daily activities that they should be focusing on. So I could probably give you 100 that I think are good ideas. What's one that's like top of mind, I will say, I think one of the best things I've ever done in my career, um you mentioned that before, there was Pavilion before there was revenue collective. There was just a bunch of tired guys getting together quarterly to have some scotch and just talk about their jobs and I was, you know, me and you and uh, Sam and Dave Gavin and Adam um, and Andrea, I mean and the gals Andrea and Emmanuel, absolutely, we had a really good crew would be 10 or 15 of us rotating that could just really openly and honestly talk about what was going on in our business and what we...

...found was that we were all kind of reinventing the wheel the same way in different industries weren't competitive with each other, but we're really doing a lot of the same things and that turned into a quarterly meeting and a chat group and uh it's one of the best things I ever did in my career, because it helped me so much to understand what I was doing wrong with, I don't know, a tech stack that I was building, what I was doing wrong by managing up to my ceo or to my board. It helped me negotiate my job because I knew about what the offers was. I got one of the best jobs I ever got in my career because I took one of the wise men of our group, went to Natasha and brought me with him and it was one of getting, it was my M. B. A. Um an enterprise software shout out, shout out, Dave Gavin, who I'm getting on the pot as well. Uh truly truly one of the SAGES of the original group and uh and honestly, that guy has probably given so much advice to folks and um, I always ask myself man, how can I ever help him give him advice. So hopefully he gets a lot of restaurants, you know, a good well, yeah, that, yeah, I think it's, I think that is the most amazing thing and as Pavilion has grown, of course you have all these benefits of having the, you know, Thousands and thousands of people that are involved now. But it's also hard to get context from those answers. So we started doing these small councils again, they get back to like 10 or 15 people that really have context in your business. You can openly share what's going on and when someone answers a question, you know, where it's coming from you know, like if you if you trust them on this topic and and what the background is and they have contacts in my business so they can really help give advice and you know, that is something that I want to get back to, and I think it's really, really, truly been one of the my secrets to help me with whatever the hell we're trying to do.

Cool, cool. Love it. And we'll look, you guys are growing, we know that what are you hiring for? Big role right now that we're trying to grab as an A B. M. Marketer or a head of enterprise marketing uh demand. Um focus. Uh hard hard one to find in this market. If anyone knows anyone, please send well, we'll flood the resumes in based off the pot. I love it. And um look, you know, you've already you've already we've already been naming names here, but any shout outs that you want to give uh you know to to folks that you appreciate what they you know what they're putting out there, who like who would you even look at for, You know, a B. M. Content or stuff like that. You know, there's a lot of good people out there. I will tell you actually, Mark Mark Costello from outreach. Uh, I'm not a huge fan of all the linkedin influencer stuff, but I think he's been just constantly turning out really short, actionable and very thoughtful sequences. His like executive hates uh series. I thought it's been really, really good. Another guy actually a recent customer and partner of ours, sterling snow uh out of D. V. D. We just got by pay and he's part of this Utah mafia, the silicon slopes and his entire thing on linkedin is just cheering so hard for every single Utah company and anyone that's his customers and they put billboards up to congratulate everyone and every single one of his posts is like a L. F. G. Utah. I still don't know what L. F. G. Means, but I bet it's something really, really fun. Uh go ahead. You know, Brandon, you can, you can, you can, you can curse on the pot I think, but it's let's frickin go right. It's such a cool, everyone's trying to kind of like...

...puff themselves out and put stuff out and he has just made what I think is an incredible brand around cheering on and building his community in Utah and I think it's Chefs kiss amazing there it is. I love it. All right. Well speaking of Chef's kiss? Um, where give us give us a favorite spot of yours that we can go eat. Uh, so I have a, could be, yeah, it could be anywhere. Could be anywhere. Doesn't tell you what I've been locked down for two years with Covid. We just had a baby. I moved to the suburbs, so I've been kind of stuck and recently started going back in the city and my office happens to be around 30th in park, which is right across the street from honestly what I think maybe one of the best restaurants in the world, Hill Stone, totally not, not, not super fancy chain restaurant. Every time I go in there I get so happy. Everything on the menu is amazing. Perfect vibe. I think they, uh, they're elite and I can't get enough of it when I go and see honestly, this is a great answer because it's one of the places that no one like because it's a chain restaurant because it's no one's going to say that. And you know what? There are so many secret, like real deep into food. People who are like, you know what's great fucking hailstones, great. You know, and, and there's, there's something about being able to get consistent service, consistent food, consistent value, you know, all the time. I mean, it's uh, kudos to them shout out. They have an incredible management program that they put together. So, um, I agree with you. All right, Dave, we're going to lunch there now. We'll go, me and you. We'll meet up in a suburb man and we'll go to lunch. Dave awesome to have you on. So happy, so happy for all the things that are happening for you. And uh, you know, let's, let's get a shout out to that art behind you. Beautiful. I think it's...

...your wife's stuff. Yeah. My, my, my my wife has, yeah. Anyone listening. Uh, at least dash B dot com. Go check it out. My wife's got an incredible business, appreciate appreciate that. David, my man. Talk soon. All right, That's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in the Apple podcast. Spotify app. Do it. Uh, my, my holiday gift is you rating or reviewing this podcast and then hit the subscribe button. So you don't miss episodes reminder. This episode was brought to you by sentosa. They deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make your outreach more personal. I had so much fun today. I hope you did too. Now get out there and crush your end of year numbers. Yeah.

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