The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

Ep 63: The Importance of Internal and External Marketing w/ James Gilbert

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 63: The Importance of Internal and External Marketing w/ James Gilbert

Part of the TGIM! (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

...all right, T g. I am. Thank God it'sMonday. Welcome back to the revenue collective podcast, where we helprevenue leaders up level their skill set and help them get the career thatthey want. I'm your host, Tom Alamo, excited for today's episode, and beforewe get to some great content, I do want to give a quick shout out to oursponsor. This episode is brought to you by Quote a path, the commissiontracking software built for sales, operations, finance and accountingteams. If running commissions and payroll has you running for the hills,quota path is for you. Quote A path helps organizations track and managecommissions and pay their teams accurately and on time every time. Keepyour team motivated and on target. Simplify your commissions at quota pathdot com slash revenue. Dash collective and give your reps the gift oftransparency. Okay, for today's episode, I'm talking. My friend James GilbertJames has 17 years and marketing. He's a thought leader. He's a podcast host.He's a contributor to Forbes. He's an author. He's a lot of things. He's alsothe head of marketing at CRM next, and James is so knowledgeable and I'mgrateful that he was able to share a lot of that knowledge that he has, uh,in marketing on the come up of that, how he went from kind of like a DataAnalytics person, which is not a typical path to get to be a CMO. So howhe took that path, the communication that he's doing through podcasts andwriting and a big thing that I learned about was internal marketing. I lovetalking about that. How much of the job of of a leader marketing leaders reallyabout internal marketing versus just external and building a brand? So Iloved having James on the show. One quick note before we get into it. Ifyou find value, would love if you head over to Apple, subscribe and left afive star review. That's what helps us pray. Great content, get guests andkeep these episodes pumping out for you. So, without further ado, let's getstraight into my conversation with James Gilbert. It all right? JamesGilbert, head of marketing at CRM. Next. Welcome to the revenue collectivepodcast. How you doing today? Doing good. Thanks for having me. Absolutely.Are you, um I always like to ask where in the world the guests are because younever quite know from LinkedIn in in a covid world, Are you in Utah or youelsewhere? Right now? I am born and raised here, but did move away for alittle while, lived in Georgia for a little while, moved back. So back inUtah can't get enough of it. That's one of those places that, uh, in a weirdway Boston, where I'm from is feel similarly. But I feel like people fromUtah people from Boston, if they're born there, they end up coming backthere or never leaving. It's just one of those places that has. I feel areally strong hold of people from a community perspective versus maybeother places like California, where it's more of a hodgepodge. Yeah, youknow, it's interesting because there's a lot of people that know about theskiing part of Utah, which is the northern side. But a lot of peopledon't know about the southern side of Utah, which is your red rock, andyou're like four hours from eight different national parks. You know youhave your you have Moab Arches, National Park, Zions national park,even the Grand Canyon. I mean, you have so much stuff in the southern side ofthe state that people just never even know about. So that's one of the thingsI love about it Just super unique Southern sides, more like Californiaweather. And the northern side is more like real Utah weather. You're going toget snow. You're gonna get rain. You're gonna get the four seasons. Yeah, Ilove that. I love that sometimes I missed the four seasons, you know,living in the Bay area. It's just so you know, kind of one level all yearround. That's okay, though. You guys get weather most of the year, so yeah,totally. So before we get into the...

...nitty gritty here on marketing, I'mpersonally, I'm a big quote fanatic, and I see kind of like 60% of a quotebehind your head, So I'd love if you could you could you share what that is?Sure, it's the most important work that you're ever going to do is within yourown home. And I I stand by that 100% because I think that that is ultimatelyhow we build future leaders that is ultimately how we make change. And thatis ultimately how we really have an impact on the world is with theChildren that were raising and with the people that were around the most. And Iimagine that, like I've heard and I'm not, I'm not a parent. Uh, I'll usethat as a disclosure, but a lot of the listeners are, I imagine, likeleadership and running a team. And helping to run a company is not thatdifferent from running a householder, leading a household or working withyour kids and your partner and things like that, right? I mean, there's gotto be a lot of parallels, you know, there are some for sure, but there'salso a lot of non parallels, you know, like your you don't always raising kidslike you don't always have the experience necessarily that you'regoing to run into as leaders where you have, you know, strong individuals andwillpower and all those other things that really play a role into who peoplereally are. But ultimately, I think the boils down to just treating people likethey're human, and as long as you do that, I think that it translates prettywell, but not everybody. For the record, like even if you aren't raising kids oreven if you were raising kids, not everybody has the same mentality aroundhow to do that. So I think that it brings a unique perspective for sure.Yeah, yeah, I think I think that's great. And so to kind of get into it,you know, something that is is really clear to me. As you know, I was doingsome research on you and and it's particularly on LinkedIn is just seeinghow involved you are in the community, right in the marketing and sales andoverall revenue community. And you know something that you can put in your bioright? It's like I just want to help people. I want to give value that Iwish I would have been given in my career, inspire impact, lives and givewithout asking and being human. I'd love for you to just talk about that,and you know where you learn some of those lessons because I think it's sovaluable for anyone at any point in their career, but especially early intheir career, like yours truly, or like maybe some of the folks listening totake that advice and use that to build up their career and build the career ofothers around them. You know, I've been fortunate enough to have a really goodpath to get to where I'm at, and I'm still pretty young to be here. And Ithink one of the reasons why I've been fortunate enough to be there is I'veput myself in situations and I've had leaders that have put me in situationswhere they've gotten totally out of the way, and I think that's telling. I'vealso had leaders that have done the complete opposite, and I think that,you know, as growing individuals and growing professionals, you know, I evenhave this on my team where you know we have one on ones with specific peopleon the team, and they identify an area that they want to grow into. But theydon't know how to get there, and it's never talked about them a couple oftimes that I've been to CMO and one of the questions that never gets askedwith people. Surprisingly enough, you might hire somebody for writing or fordigital marketing or for demand. Shin or maybe an A B M person. Or maybe it'sthe cells rap, but it's so interesting to me how often they aren't doing whatthey actually truly are passionate about. So any time that I've ever led ateam that surprises them, But I come in and ask that question, you know, whatare you really passionate about? And I want them to be totally honest with me.And there's been moments where I've had to help develop somebody who was adeveloper into a designer, and they...

...became one of the best designers thatI've ever known. Because of that, right, people that have written content or nowis what they've done. Their whole lives turn into professional video editors.And I think that what I wish would have been done with me in my career is thatpeople have taken more time to actually care and really helped develop, notjust like for the selfish reasons that you have to as leader, which is tryingto get members and all that other stuff. I think too often leaders get stuckbehind their their their own pride and being seen as weak or being seen aslike, well I don't have all the answers, so that's kind of the approach that Ilike to take with. It is I don't have all the answers and I promote that like,I genuinely want to learn from everybody because there's not one rightway to do things, do anything. And things change too often for you to notfocus on learning from everybody, any chance you get, So I think that's whereit comes from. I had a lot of leaders to that took credit for things that Idid and I didn't like that. And I think that it's a very common thing, evenmoments where everybody that they were taking credit for knew that it wascoming from me. And those are things that I just try to put my team in, thebest situation to where they don't have to deal with the same problems that Idealt with. But that doesn't mean that I don't have my own set of problemsthat they're dealing with with me too. You know what I mean. So it's a healthybalance. Yeah, it's so interesting that you bring up that point of askingpeople you know what? They're passionate about or what they want tobe or where they want to take things. I'm reading the book. Uh, so good. Theycan't ignore you right now. Have you read that? I haven't. That's when I'mgonna go down. Okay? Yeah. No, it's good. It's good. My my boss recommendedto me, and, uh um, I can't vouch for it completely yet. I'm not through it, but,you know, part of what they talk about is is kind of this, like craftsmanmindset, right? Where Part of the reason why or at least his theory inthis book is You know, part of the reason why people do love their jobs isbecause you can get really good at it. You know, that helps you enjoy it moreif you start to really enjoy the process and things like that. And so Ithink your question off the bat of trying to figure out Well, what doesthis person What are they naturally interested in? You can kind of pushthem towards the areas of that job that fit that. Like, if you are really into,if I can speak from a salesperson If you're really extroverted, then Hey,maybe you're gonna really like the meetings and even the cold calls andcold emails part if if you're, you know, more introverted, you might like moreof the negotiation and the problem solving the account, mapping thingslike that. And so trying to map what you're interested in and what you'rereally good at as part of the job processes is something that he makesthe point of in this book that I find to be interesting. Yeah, I really likethat. I mean, the thing is like, everybody is unique, you know? Andsometimes they get put into a path because that's the path of leastresistance for them and always has been. So they just get complacent and used toit. And I think when you take the approach of asking that question, itmight surprise you like I've had marketers change to sales and saleschange to marketing, and I think that you've got to allow people to choosetheir path, and I think too often we try to pick it for them, and then wetry to guide them in that path, and then they feel stuck. But they don'tever express that because they don't they're either in a culture thatdoesn't allow that or they just Yeah, I think a lot of people are scared totalk to leaders and tell them. Hey, I know you brought me on for this, but Ihate it. You know, how do you have that conversation? But if you have an openenvironment where you know they can...

...explore possibilities, then it changesthings. And I think that we have to do a better job as leaders to create thattype of environment for them. And it also benefits you, I imagine right,because if you're someone on your team has this interest in in something thatmaybe you're not privy to or you're not good at or you don't even you don'teven have eyes on it. And now all of a sudden, it could be a whole new channelfor your marketing organization or the company as a whole if it if it'ssomething completely new. But let's say someone had a really big passion in,you know, like I know that you're into podcasting as well. But let's say youweren't and I open your eyes to how powerful podcasting could be orblogging or you tubing or something else that you know your team wasn'tfocused on, It could actually have a whole new dimension to things that youhad a blind spot in. Absolutely, I can tell you, like we've created thisenvironment at CRM next with my team and you'll see stuff from our team thatjust blows people away. And that's because they have total autonomy andfreedom to be able to be creative, execute on it, own it, the whole nine,and they get all the credit for it. Unfortunately, people talk to me aboutit, but I always say like it's the team that's doing that stuff and it's sotrue. But you've got to create that type of environment because I know likeearlier on in my career, I had a unique path to where I'm at. I'm a rare CMO inthe sense that I was surrounded by data. I was surrounded by doing marketingoperations and I wasn't the greatest communicator. I wasn't a good writerand I wasn't really good at brand. Those three things are three of thecore areas that most CMO was land a job right? That was not me in any way,shape or form. But over the last couple of years, being in a role like this,you know, I've tried to hone my craft a little bit, you know, and become abetter writer and write more publications, you know, right chaptersin a book that that was recently done this last year. And but I still that'snot that's not a strong suit of mine. So why would I try and do somethingthat isn't that what I would call somewhat of a weakness right when I canbring people on that are much better at it and get out of the way? I thinkthat's the important part is you've really got to get out of the way as aleader and recognize that you don't need to be the final saying everything.That's silly music. You make a great point, like for the for the folks thatare in, you know, maybe a marketing operations or rev ops type of roleright now that do have aspirations to get to a CMO level or c r o level right?And, you know, usually to your point, that's kind of reserved, oftentimes,for people that you know CMOs for people that know how to build the brand.You know, the C R. O might be the VP of sales, who was formerly the bestsalesperson. So you came at it from kind of this different angle of, youknow, really knowing the data behind things. And then maybe, you know,worked on your craft of communication. Could you walk me through like thatprocess on on how the operations piece actually helped you, you know, land therole that actually helps you succeed in the role. I think one of the thingsthat I learned earlier on was how much data can impact the rest of theorganization. And I think that when you try to get to the point where you'retrying to land a CMO role or head of marketing or even a VP of marketingrole, I think that you that often times people get tunnel vision with that roleand they think that they have to be experts in everything marketing. And Ithink what they what they may be lack is about the ability to think morebroad across the organization. So when I started leading some of the datastrategies at some of the companies that I've been at, It allowed me theability to speak to things that you know, those that were really good atbrand. They could speak to brand, but it would be more of like a gut feellike this is how I think we should do...

...it. I would come in and I'd be like,Well, this is what the data is telling us. This is what the market marketresearch is telling us. This is what actual customers are telling us, and Iwould bring in this conglomerate of data. I would summarize it reallynicely so that they had one view and executives will be blown away by it. SoI could I could literally no pun intended. But I could own the room justbecause of that. And like there, there's truth to the saying that thosewho own the data on the room and own the dialogue because that's ultimatelythe Holy Grail, like when you when you have data that spans across anorganization and you can speak to sometimes their own function betterthan they can, because you have an insight into things that they don'thave because they don't dive in the weeds. That's pretty powerful. And Ithink that's also how more CMOs and VPs our marketing can get seats at thetable on their board as well is you really have to start understanding thefinancials. You have to start understanding, like the strategy behindthose functions that are outside or just marketing. And I think that'ssomewhat unique. I love that, and I want to talk a little bit about culture.I saw you put a post out this week that that's been top of mind for you. Youknow, there's the, you know, the fairly famous quote from Peter Drucker. Thatculture eats strategy for breakfast. I'd love to hear you talk about thatbecause, you know, from someone that is very obviously not a CMO or CEO or seeanything like myself. I'd love to hear how you work with the CEO to help buildout that culture right, because there's kind of two prongs of culture that Isee. One is externally to your customers, to prospective employees, toyour partners, et cetera, and then the internal that your current employeeshave of what that culture is and making sure they feel safe and included andwelcomed and all of those things. So I'd love to hear you talk about both ofthose prongs and how you work to build that. Well, I will say that I'm not an expertin this in any way, shape or form, like I'm still learning so much. So what I'mabout to say, like take with the great assault. But you know, in my experience,it's much tougher to communicate internally and to get adoption ofculture than it is to do it externally. I'll give you an example. When a lot ofthis stuff was happening in 2020 and there was a lot of riots that weregoing on and all sorts of stuff, you saw a huge companies talk the talkright on their LinkedIn and their social. All that crap like good on you,good job doing an external communication. But how many of thosecompanies were actually living what they were preaching? That's a wholedifferent ball game, and I think that it's a lot tougher and to be honestwith that, there's not enough conversations that are happening withleaders even about this, because it's they're so scared of it. They're scaredof doing it wrong and being perceived in in the wrong light. And I think wehave to start talking about it more openly and realize that not everybodyhas all the answers. They're just There's not a playbook for internalcommunication around culture. There's just not because every organization istoo unique to do that. So one of the things that we've done is I've workedwith are our executive leadership team Now. When I got here, we didn't reallyhave a culture. Nothing was documented. So I've had to build a lot of us fromscratch with the leaders that are that we have at the company today. And we'vehad a lot of challenges with it and some things that we've had to addressas a company that if we communicated that externally, it would. What's thepoint right culture? The reason why that quote is so relevant is becauseculture really does drive everything that we do. When you look at how thingsare perceived in the marketplace, it's...

...got to be genuine, so one of the thingsthat we've built in our culture is when we reach out to people that we sell to.We don't do it in a really sells the way, and that's an eight and part ofour culture, and we hear that in the marketplace. So, like, you know, weleverage Ganga. Ton Gong is by far my favorite technology that I have on ourtech stack, and that's speaking from a marketing point of view, not for myself.Point of view. And we try to make the internal communication more importantthan the external. Like If I don't do any external communication around whatwe're doing with our culture, so be it. If I don't do any externalcommunication regarding D, I, so be it. All I care about is that the peoplethat we have at the company feel that we are doing the right thing because ifthey feel that way they will help communicate it. They'll be advocates. Ithink Gang has done a really good job of this. Everybody had gone lovesworking there. You can see that the culture is just present right, and itis communicated across almost all channels. When you talk to anybody atGong right, and I think that that is, that's something that we can learn.That's something that we can try to implement. And I think that God hasdone it so well that we're all striving to get to get to that Holy Grail. Iguess you could say and I think it's there, it's in front of us and we justhave to make the right steps. But I think one of the ways that we got to dothat is people first before anything else. Let's, uh, you know, just put iton the table. I did not pay James to say any of those kind words about God.Uh oh, They are appreciated. Um, I'm curious. There's a few things I want todive into. That on the first is if I just go in chronological order. Youmentioned the sales team you're known in The industry is having more of acasual sales approach. Could you elaborate on that? Like what? Is Is itthe verbiage? Which is it? People are wearing T shirts on zoom calls. Is ithow you're going about negotiations? Like, walk me through that a little bit?I'm curious not to give away too much of our secret sauce, but yeah, onlywhat you're only what you can, you know. We serve a market that is unique, andwhen I say it's unique, it really is. If you've ever worked with creditunions, you'll know that it's very unique. I mean, there's so many ofthese folks that aren't aren't they don't communicate via LinkedIn. Theyhave their own little communities and, you know, communities like see youinsight and kuna. So one of the main value adds that we found when we weredoing our podcast and when we were talking to customers and potentialcustomers was they really need to see that you care about. So we took that toheart every single time we would talk to somebody. We would try to add valueto the conversation. There was times where they were talking about one ofour competitors and even talking about using us for marketing automation. AndI get brought into that conversation and we would be totally real. With them,we'd say, Look, we are not a marketing automation platform. It's actually abetter for you if you think about your tech stack by marketing automationplatform to do some of those things alongside what we do because That's theThat's the benefit. And people were blown away by this approach, like wow,like a vendors coming in and telling us that, you know, they're thinking aboutusing them for the wrong thing. And we we meant it. And we keep we keepmeaning it. So we bring. We bring a lot of value without asking. I think that'sthe key. Sometimes you have to bring value without asking for something inreturn. And that's an unheard of thing. And a lot of cells, cells,organizations. And the the other piece that you're mentioning in that, youknow, kind of talk about culture was the emphasis, the great emphasis thatyou place on the internal communication. What forms of you know, what mediums doyou use is that you're setting up a lot...

...of like internal webinars. Is it? Well,weekly email from the marketing team is it you know, a certain slack channel. Iknow that's maybe more of a tactical question, but maybe something thatpeople could actually take to their companies, you know, again withoutgiving too much away of your secret sauce over there. But we do a couple ofthings. One we hold everybody accountable to our cultural pillars. Soin your performance reviews, we wait culture a lot higher than we do. Youlike individual performance against tactics and numbers, and we do that bydesign because we want people to take it as seriously as we try to take it asa leadership team. Are there improvements we can make 100% but weuse communication channels kind of like a slack, please. Teams. We also do whatwe call quarterly awards where every quarter we recognize three individualswithin the U. S side of the business that are living those cultural valuesreally, really well. And they have to be voted on by the leadership teamvoted on by other leaders within the company. And we need to see thatthey've done those things that cross team collaboration, those kinds ofthings. And we do those quarterly awards and it pumps people up becausewe we monetize that for them specifically, and we try to build, youknow, we you hear in the marketplace a lot people talking about community well,to build a community. I think internally first, and I think that'sthe key to a lot of this, and that's what we try to do is we're trying tobuild a little community internally first, where people are recognized forthe great work they're doing there, recognized for not being super cells eand being real with people. And if somebody says, Hey, look like we have aBut we have a budget meeting in a month and a half, let's keep a dialogue, butwe're not ready to make a decision. Don't push a decision when they have amonth and a half before they can even talk about budget like it's really justbeing human to people. And I think gets really lost in all of the stuff that wedo from a marketing perspective, all the stuff we do from a salesperspective, it's really just being human to people. And I can tell youfirsthand when I have vendors come to me and they say, Hey, James, this isonly good. This deal is only good for another week because that's our end ofquarter, so I can only pull strings and I have to go talk to my VP aboutpulling these strings. Do you have any idea how that sounds? That is just themost pathetic methods of selling I have ever heard of. And by the way ithappens with everybody. You all do it and it's silly, like if you can't giveme a deal because of the fact that I can't sign in two weeks on yourtimeline, I'm not going to do a deal with you like that's The other thing is,I think that you have to identify value, add that not just it's not just to sell,but how they're going to help you. One of the things that we we pitch toeverybody is we want to be a partner. We don't want to be a vendor. We don'twant to be. You know, you're next. You're not our next cell, you're apartner, so we're going to help grow with you, just like we would want youto help us grow. And I think that that's something that people could takeaway is trying to do that in your sales process. I mean, remember, I've donecells before, so this isn't something that I'm coming out of the blue with. Ieven got like a side bachelor's degree and professional cells. Yes, they doexist, and I think that's one of the things that I learned a lot. Even doingthat is you just got to be human in the whole situation, and I have to call outthe thing that you mentioned a minute ago about the internal awards.Coincidentally, we we do that at dawn...

...and that it's something that reallyresonated with me during our our company kick off. We have these eightvalues operating principles that we go by and and a lot of companies, and thisis not an ad for going. It's just maybe, you know, food for thought. For a lotof, uh, you know, marketing teams out there internally is like a lot ofcompanies have values and they put it on the wall and, like, have empathy or,you know, customer always comes first and then you know, people don't actthat way. People were getting awards specifically tied to those operatingvalues, and people were in tears when they got the award like it meant somuch to some people that they got those awards and, um, you know, I felt sojust invigorated to just be at that meeting and watching that happen. Andso I think if you do it right and you really are living by the values of theprinciples or whatever you're using for your company internally, you can'treally build that internal community. I love that concept of the internalcommunity, James. I mean, look, we have a long ways to go before I think peopleare in tears, like gone. But, hey, you know what we're I think the other thingthat you can that you can do is marketers specifically be a sales rep.Like enough of the bullshit. Stop sending content over to them. Stopsending alerts over to them. Be a sales rep. See what it's like. See what it'slike getting the content library that you send them and trying to translatethat into a conversation, see what it's like and that can also help internallycommunicate the culture so that it's lived because I think that's a that'sanother big missing pieces. You know, marketers talk about a lot about thisand to be to be tech world, they say all the time like, Oh, yeah, well, youknow, it sells as one of your customers. You have to think through their eyes,but they never get in the weeds and actually do the work. I think that'stelling. That's one of the things that I did right out of the gates. Cominghere is I went in and sold a couple of deals and I got to see firsthandeverything that we were doing from a marketing perspective that wastranslating and wasn't falling completely flat. And there were thingsthat I identified that I was like, Man, I really thought we were on point withthat and we were way off. So if you want to know why, sometimes cells andmarketing don't align. Put yourself in their shoes and viceversa. Half cells get get a feel for what it's like, like in the life of amarket or two, and I think that can help both sides. That's great advice. Iknow we're getting, you know, somewhat close on time. I've got a few morequestions for you. One is just around, you know, podcast. And if I may get,you know, a little macro for a second talking about podcasts on a podcast,I'd love to hear when you have the podcast for CRM next, like first talkabout it a little bit. And what you're what you're talking about? But also isthat a Is that a lead driver? Is that an awareness driver? Is that, you know,strategically having customers on is that you know, what is the what is theintent behind it for the, you know, the business case there? Yeah, that's agreat question. Our podcast is so important to everything that we'redoing. For the record, if you want to listen to it, it's called banking onexperience. You can find it anywhere. And you know, what we're trying to dowith the podcast is again build community. It's build relationshipswith banks and credit unions. It's build awareness for everybody and the U.S. Who needs it? For the record, everybody in the U. S. Needs financialeducation. This is no secret because we've been able to identify that as oneof the main topics that has talked about more than any other thing acrossalmost all financial institutions is they want to be seen as an as anadviser for financial education, and they're trying to figure out how to doit. So I think that we've created a podcast that allows people to do that.We bring guests on that are specific to credit unions, specific to banks, evensome vendors that help solve some of...

...the problems that they're having. Andthen we also have gone on all of those podcasts. Here's a little bit of aunique thing we use gone as market research. So here's a fun little tidbitfor you. I've probably gathered more market research than Gartner andForrester when it comes to credit unions in one year than they have. Andthat's simply because my audience with the podcast is so broad against ourspecific nish that I can provide better insights than sometimes they can. And that's telling. It changes ourstrategy. It changes the market value that we bring. And I know Forrester andGartner are going to have a heyday about this. But whatever. It's thetruth, though, and then and then I'm getting insights directly from peoplein the industry, helps us change our content. Strategy helps change so much,so we use it as a primary driver for strategy around what we build in ourcontent, what we build in our webinars, what's relevant, that we're going to bedoing for campaigns. The messaging that our sales team uses, it drives all ofthat. It's genius. I think, um, you know, I'm obviously biased. I'm long onpodcasts and think that every company should have one and be able to tailorit. You know, just as you're talking about it, for whatever their particularniches, and to gain research about your prospects and customers to help giveyour customers a platform to help learn how to serve them, better learn theirchallenges, whatever it might be. There's so much good that can come ofthat. And I think that should absolutely be someone on someone'sstrategy board for 2021. I'm curious, since we're on the revenue collectivepodcast. You remember. I'd love to hear you talk just for a minute or two abouthow you leverage the community and you're someone that is really activewriting and podcasting, as we're saying. And there's so many ways to leverage acommunity like revenue collective. Whether it's one on one connects ifit's slack. If it's the webinars that they have, it's the playbooks, all thatdifferent stuff. So I'm just curious, like for you personally how youleverage it to your advantage for your career. I think one of the ways Ileverage it is I really value peer to peer interaction. I really valuelearning from peers that are, you know, in a similar position as I am, becauseyou just don't get that through LinkedIn like you have people poststuff all the time, and it's great and the trends, but you don't get like realdialogue. And one of the things that I really love and I think revenuecollective has done this really well is they've given, like a niche for CMOs toget on like a weekly talk and bi weekly talk. And there's a topic and you're onthere with your peers and you're talking about those subjects. And to behonest with you, like there's there's some people that would kill for theinsides of that stuff. Like there was one that we were on this the other daylast week, and we were all talking about the big analyst offenders thatyou you got to work with, you know, here we are. A bunch of CMO is talkingabout how much of a paint it is and how, if we had a choice none of us wouldwork with. Do you think Forrester Gartner know that? No. They think we'rebringing all this value. But in that conversation with a bunch of other CMOSpeer to peer, none of us wanted to work with them. I mean, their way aroundthem. Yeah, well, they're I don't know. That's a different topic. But I mean,that's a good example of how there's so much value in and also just gettingvalidation a little bit and what you're doing or if what you're doing is wayoff way off base. I think sometimes when you're in those nish groups andyou can share some of the ideas that...

...you have, it's worthwhile knowing thatother people find it valuable to. So I really enjoyed that part. Yeah, I mean, that's great. And, um,maybe we have to take it off line to, uh, you know, we won't We won't bashany of the other analyst firms or anything about that. But but to yourpoint, just trying to find, you know, like minded folks. And you know, if I'ma CMO and I go and I see another CMO post about something on linked in.There's only so much you can glean from those 12 lines that they're putting forthe blog that they wrote or the podcast. So to be able to have those livedialogues and actually have someone to facilitate that for you is a greatvalue. So that's amazing. James. This has been a blast. I've loved you. Dropsome absolute nuggets of wisdom here for anyone that is leading a marketingteam or aspires to. I'd be curious one. As we're wrapping up, definitely letpeople know where they can get in touch with you. If it's linked in again, youknow, listen to podcasts wherever it might be. And then if you have anyother last words for the revenue leaders out there that might belistening to the show. Yeah, you can obviously find me on LinkedIn thatthere's no secret to that. So just find me there, but and then I'd love youknow, if you want to come listen to the podcast, I think we're doing somepretty good things there again, banking on experiences, what you search for andI guess the last point of advice that I give for revenue leaders is, regardlessof the number we have to hit. We have to remember that, more importantly thanever. Now we have to treat people even in our funnel like humans. So and thatgoes for culture. That goes for how we build a marketing program, how we buildthe cells program. We can't forget that that's the most important thing. Mm, Sotrue, So true. And that's great. A great way to, uh, to leave us off. Lastquestion I got for you. I know you're Utah Jazz guy. What's the predictionfor the season? I think. What? I looked it up before the show. I couldn't evenbelieve there versus the Western Conference. So what's the what's yourWhat's your prediction There? We're coming for you all. That's all I'mgonna say. That's That's all he's got to say. I'm a Celtics fan, so you'renot coming. There's nothing. You know. We got nothing good going on anyway. Sodon't even worry about us. I know. I think we're gonna I think we're havinga good season. I think there's obviously some pretty big grudges wehave, and that's a dangerous team. When we're playing as well as we are and wehave a chip on our shoulder. There's a lot to play for. So absolutely, James,this is a blast. I loved having you on appreciate you spending some time andgiving some advice to listeners. Thank you. Likewise. Thank you so much forhaving me. Alrighty, then. Thank you for listening to the entire episode ofthat podcast while you're walking the dog or cooking pasta. Or, you know,waiting for your next meeting to start. That should have been an email. Eitherway, thank you for that. If you found value, please head over to Apple. Youcan subscribe. Leave a five star review that that helps us tremendously. Youcan always add me or connect with me on LinkedIn. My name's Tom a limo anddefinitely hit up our guest, James Gilbert, or more. The last note here isthat again this episode was brought to you by quote a path. Put a pet is thefirst radically transparent end to end compensation solution from sales repsto financing. Get started for free at quota path dot com slash revenue Dashcollective And that's it for me, folks. Have a great week. Get after it. I'llsee you next Monday piece. Say something mhm.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (174)