The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 month ago

Ep 147: Innovations in Healthcare Tech w/ Shelli Pavone

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Ep 147: Innovations in Healthcare Tech w/ Shelli Pavone

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to thePavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon martin and you are listening toIs this a good time to show where hypo pavilion members on the hot 15 minutes.We hear their incredible story is it's a lot of fun. Chose around Tuesdays andThursdays. Hit subscribe. So you don't miss hearing from our experts. Ourguest today is Shelly Pavane. She is the Ceo and founder uh co founder ofEnlightened, which is connecting healthcare companies with the healthcare experts. It's kind of a really interesting thing. I'm psyched to divein on it. We talk a lot about just the health innovation in the health carespace and what's going on there. From a sales perspective this month, sponsoris Cindy also send also the leading sending platform is the most effectiveway for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage atstrategic points to the customer journey. By connecting digital andphysical strategies. Companies can engage, acquire and retain customerseasier than before. All right, let's do this episode 69. Is this a good time?All right, everyone. I'm so excited to have our next guest on the, on the show.This is Shelly Pavane. She is the Ceo and co founder of Enlightened Celli.Glad to have you here. Thank you so much for having me. My pleasure. We'llall meet No filler. We jump right in first question for everybody. Tell usabout your current role. Almost 2.5 years of you in this company runningthis company. Tell us about the company. Tell us about the role and then give usa little history of how you got here. Yeah, of course. So as you mentioned,I'm the Ceo and co founder of Enlightened Enlightened is a vettednetwork of health care professionals that uses a marketplace model toprovide access to healthcare insight, expertise and collaboration fromanywhere in the world with a click of a button is what we say. But I've been inthe healthcare industry for my entire career. And previous to Startingenlightened, I held multiple revenue...

...leadership roles for health techstartups and across my career, you know, I started out in the pharmaceuticalindustry, I have spent time doing oh our sales, I was on call for years andmy entrance into the tech industry is really what kind of drove me towardsstarting Enlightened and becoming the Ceo of Enlightened, I worked for somereally interesting health tech companies dealing with evidence basedmedicine, in the selection of medical devices and value based care deliveryand I saw a little bit of a knowledge gap in the market for the industry side,right? Like those that are trying to innovate and make change and then theproviders, those that are on the front lines of delivering care, you know, Ithink we know that there is An issue with healthcare innovation, 96% ofhealthcare innovations fail and on average it takes about 17 years fromidea inception to widespread adoption and health care and I noticed that theway that industry was interacting with the, you know, stakeholders and users,providers and health care left a lot to be desired. And so I startedenlightened to try to kind of close that knowledge gap and ultimately todemocratize access to that health care expertise, so that even somebody who isstarting a company in health care because they've had maybe a personalillness or someone in their family has suffered from something or you know,they have gone through an experience like, you know, childbirth andpostpartum and we need people that come from diverse backgrounds andexperiences to innovate in the healthcare industry and it wanted tomake sure that we're inspiring them to do that. But giving them the resourcesand access to the expertise that they need along that journey. And so that'swhat really propelled me into starving,...

...enlightened, I love it, give me a sense,I mean, give me a sense of like a user experience for somebody that's joining,let's say, to provide information or connect with others like Yeah, so we,I'll give you an example. We had a company that was in the very, veryearly days of founding, they were still kind of stealth phase and they werelooking to found a company focused on remote patient monitoring, which isdefinitely one of the biggest sectors that we get companies starting from,you know, especially in light of covid right, figuring how to treat patientsin their homes and monitor conditions remotely is really important. And socompanies like that, what they do is they sign up for enlightened pay asubscription fee and then with that they have access to our network ofhealth care professionals and providers. And the network itself is heavilycurated. It's vetted, we take the time to get to know every one of theprofessionals in our network. We write a bio for them that's hosted on oursite. And so this company came on and they created a company profile and thena project. Initially, what they wanted to do was engaged with a number ofproviders to talk about remote patient monitoring the market as a whole. Whatare some of the barriers to entry patient selection, you know, theirexperience in, you know, types of things to monitor sensors that were onthe market today. And what they did was they created that project and then ourtool gives them the opportunity to kind of search and engage for the relevantexpertise and because we collect a lot of data on the members, we includethings in their profile that would explain whether or not they haveexperience with remote patient monitoring, you know, along with theirtheir specialty and their research bibliography and, you know, all oftheir kind of passions and interests and experience. And so they were ableto search the people that they wanted to engage with kind of message themback and forth between our platform and...

...then ultimately create engagements toconnect with them to talk about those various topics and they did an initialsurvey, you know, there's 10 really highly targeted providers and then theypulled out individuals from that survey and went more in depth and did somekind of U. X. And just really looking at, you know, the market itself and anddigging in understanding a little bit more and you know, I think that it cankind of be addictive that you know, getting knowledge and understanding ofmarket, you know that they can come back and would engage with someoneagain and you know, then okay I'm gonna talk to somebody different with adifferent perspective and we've had a ton of people come in and use the toolthat way. And then, you know, we have companies that are large pharmaceuticalcompanies that want to do things like focus groups or co design workshops andso they engage, you know, the members in our network in really, you know,various ways. It's so interesting. I like I have like 1000 questions aboutthe two sided network there because right, like you need to get the doctorsonto and that's that's probably hard, we'll dive into more if we have sometime. But super interesting look, we always talk about, you know, hard workand luck being two factors to getting where you are like, I wonder if eitherof those apply to the origin stories and and co founding this company or anyother part of your career, but yeah, I mean, you know, I think hard work andluck are part of any origin story, right? I mean, you don't get to, youknow, the ceo and your career if you haven't had hard work and equally, soyou have, you have to have a little bit of luck along the way. You know, I'vehad a little bit of both in my career. I definitely credit my work ethic formost of my success and a really hard worker. I've got a job since the day Iturned 16 and, you know, worked multiple jobs throughout college. It'sjust something that has really, you...

...know, propelled me and I think that,you know, on one hand, I'm a proponent to kind of make your own luck, right?If you put in the work and if you are doing the right things then kind ofmaterializes. But I have a couple of like, interesting stories that reallyexplain kind of how I got to this piece of my career via hard work and luck.And one of them is uh, example of a company that I worked for in 2011, Istarted a role as the director of north american sales for a danish company.And during the interview process, they were discussing, you know, that theyhad nine reps kind of sdrs already selling the product that was a marketleader in europe, but that needed to gain some steam in the U. S. And sobasically I had talked to them about kind of coming in and taking over thatteam and continuously growing that product line. And the day I startedthey have had some leadership changes And they had let go of all nine SDrs.And I was also informed that the product line that they were focused onselling in the US had gone from around $11 million $5 million. Yeah. And I dida little bit of research and quickly realized that We weren't going to begetting any of that money back. You know that $6 million dollars was gonebecause there were some other manufacturers that have come into thespace and cut the cost significantly. And you know, I think that the companyI worked for was enjoying quite generous margins and and now they wereexposed for that. And so I ultimately ended up looking at their manufacturingplatform and identifying another product line that I could potentiallytake to market. And I went out and negotiate some GPO contracts if you'renot in healthcare group purchasing contracts. And it's really a lot of theways that hospitals determine the types...

...of supplies that are available and theyput a band together to get better pricing from these entities. And then Iwas able to get some early winds and some negotiations on the contracts forthe group purchasing organizations and I built a sales team and infrastructurearound the new product line and went to the market with that and had somesignificant success. And I think that that was a hard work. It was one of themost difficult things I've done in my career and what it showed me was that Ireally liked to build things and I like to take something from scratch andreally determine where the puzzle pieces sit and and grow it to besomething that's, you know, fully functional. And since then I have goneon to grow and build sales teams and sales infrastructure for a number ofcompanies. And that experience was what led me into doing this as a Ceo becauseI wasn't intimidated by building something from scratch because I wasgonna say that was, that was definitely the seeds of you becoming a Ceo clearlyand I think what a good example of a way in not a very progressive industry,but perhaps to be entrepreneurial in a company where you're not the Ceo, likeyou took something and were able to build, let's just say a mini ceo skillset in a lower risk environment than if you were to drop your job and say I'mgoing to go do it on my own. I can relate to that. I had a similarexperience um, in my career where I got to build something up from the groundup, but my name wasn't on the masthead so to speak, but that is, that's givenme all the confidence to do what I'm doing now because I knew I could do itunder somebody else's dime, not doing it on my own, so to speak, so cool. Andalong the way, I'm sure, you know, to get those deals done, you learned a tonof sales and marketing tactics, give us one that you might uh you know, want toshare. So I come from the world of...

...enterprise sales and for the majorityof my career, I have sold into hospitals which are incredibly complexand bureaucratic organizations and they make all their decisions by committee.And I think that really in any type of enterprise sale, you're going to have acommittee of people that are involved in making a decision. And for me, theone thing that I've always thought to take it back to when you're dealingwith a lot of different people within a sale cycle is really understand likeeach individual person's win as it stands with the solution that you'rebringing to the table. And it seems simple, you know, we do our discoveryand we try to understand as much as possible about the deal. But everyonethat's involved in that deal has to be motivated to some extent to help youmove forward. And if you determine what they're kind of personal wind is then Ithink that is just such an incredible driver of your success, you know, andlike the way I think of their win is you know, does it doesn't make theirjob easier. Are they going to save money in the budget? Will it help themhit their plan or a goal that they have? Maybe they'll get promotion? Right? Soany person that is kind of involved in that process, whether they're somebodywho's gonna sign or they're an economic buyer or they're just an influencer.Like how do they win by bringing your solution over the finish line? And Ithink that that is just something to think about, you know, obviously anenterprise sales, but you know, other types of sales as well, right? And justgetting to the heart of like why does it matter for this person that I'mtalking to because in the moment that's really all that matters right? It'sthat person, you know, to me sales has always been an emotional thing. Likegetting its transference of emotion to me sales and so you're you're gettingthat person to emotionally connect with what is good for them by bringing inyour solution. You'd love to think it's...

...altruism, but everyone is a statusseeking monkey. I mean, you know, I'm sure that it's not the only reasonpeople make decisions to bring in solutions, right? But it's always apart of it. And so it's there, if you're not thinking about it, you'remissing a whole layer of data and information that you could beconsidering. I love it. Any positions you're hiring for. So we're not hiringin the moment, but very soon we will be hiring for a head of client success,interesting. That's a good role to be recruiting over a long period of timefor a, for a startup. So cool, anybody interested obviously reached out toShelly and then some shoutouts, anybody who you appreciate kind of what they'rethinking is either in your space or just generally in sales. Yeah, I mean, I think, you know, in myspace again, that's, you know, really where I tend to follow the most and umone of them is his name is Nick ill Christiane and he does this newslettercalled out of pocket and for anybody that is interested in the health carespace, even if you're a novice in health care, I think his newsletter isreally excellent. He's also on twitter. His handle is I think at a killing itand uh he just gives like a really great breakdown of the health careindustry in the United States and some of the like pitfalls and the types ofindustry models. I find it to be really engrossing and it's done at a levelthat if you don't know a lot about health care, it's still understandable.So I think that That's a really great one. And then here in Massachusetts,the digital medicine society is really great. They put out a lot of reallyinteresting content in the healthcare space as well. Love it. Love it. Allright. And, and last and most important you can do it up in boston if you want,you can do it anywhere. It doesn't matter. But you need to tell me asecret what's your like your favorite...

...spot that I should go eat next time I'mI'm traveling around the country. Oh gosh, okay. Well it's probably not asecret. Right? Um, I, so I'm, I live in boston and because of the last, youknow year, so I haven't been doing a whole lot of travel because of Covid.So you know, if I would talk about my best, my favorite restaurants acrossthe country. Unfortunately some of them have closed over the last couple ofyears. But there is a new place in boston that's called Contessa. It's onthe rooftop of the Newbury hotel which is used a long, long time ago. It usedto be the Ritz then it was the Taj. Now it's kind of regained its former gloryas the Newberry and it's this insane italian restaurant on the top of theNewbury hotel and it's just a gorgeous restaurant and the food is amazing aswell. Love it. All right, we're going up, we'll make our way to the enemy.I'm from new york. So the enemy country up in boston. Yeah, I love new york toand you know, I try to get to new york at least you know a handful of times ayear. But you know last year you have to find you have to find that classsomewhere because it's not up there and wow! Yeah, I'm just kidding. Uh huh.Great to have you on. I'm excited to follow your journey here. It's a superinteresting company and like anywhere where you're trying to form amarketplace, if you will like this kind of, you know, two sided market place,it's uh they're always big bats and I think you've got something special. Sosuper cool. Thank you for coming on. Thank you so much. All right, that'sour show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, rateand review in apple podcast or Spotify apps, send it to friends, hit thesubscribe button, send it to other friends reminder. This episode isbrought to you by Sandoz. So they deliver modern direct mail,personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make your outreachmore. First. I had fun. Hope you did too. Now get out there and crush yournumbers,...

Say something. Mhm.

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