The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Ep 147: Innovations in Healthcare Tech w/ Shelli Pavone

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 147: Innovations in Healthcare Tech w/ Shelli Pavone

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon martin and you are listening to Is this a good time to show where hypo pavilion members on the hot 15 minutes. We hear their incredible story is it's a lot of fun. Chose around Tuesdays and Thursdays. Hit subscribe. So you don't miss hearing from our experts. Our guest today is Shelly Pavane. She is the Ceo and founder uh co founder of Enlightened, which is connecting healthcare companies with the health care experts. It's kind of a really interesting thing. I'm psyched to dive in on it. We talk a lot about just the health innovation in the health care space and what's going on there. From a sales perspective this month, sponsor is Cindy also send also the leading sending platform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points to the customer journey. By connecting digital and physical strategies. Companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than before. All right, let's do this episode 69. Is this a good time? All right, everyone. I'm so excited to have our next guest on the, on the show. This is Shelly Pavane. She is the Ceo and co founder of Enlightened Celli. Glad to have you here. Thank you so much for having me. My pleasure. We'll all meet No filler. We jump right in first question for everybody. Tell us about your current role. Almost 2.5 years of you in this company running this company. Tell us about the company. Tell us about the role and then give us a little history of how you got here. Yeah, of course. So as you mentioned, I'm the Ceo and co founder of Enlightened Enlightened is a vetted network of health care professionals that uses a marketplace model to provide access to healthcare insight, expertise and collaboration from anywhere in the world with a click of a button is what we say. But I've been in the healthcare industry for my entire career. And previous to Starting enlightened, I held multiple revenue...

...leadership roles for health tech startups and across my career, you know, I started out in the pharmaceutical industry, I have spent time doing oh our sales, I was on call for years and my entrance into the tech industry is really what kind of drove me towards starting Enlightened and becoming the Ceo of Enlightened, I worked for some really interesting health tech companies dealing with evidence based medicine, in the selection of medical devices and value based care delivery and I saw a little bit of a knowledge gap in the market for the industry side, right? Like those that are trying to innovate and make change and then the providers, those that are on the front lines of delivering care, you know, I think we know that there is An issue with healthcare innovation, 96% of healthcare innovations fail and on average it takes about 17 years from idea inception to widespread adoption and health care and I noticed that the way that industry was interacting with the, you know, stakeholders and users, providers and health care left a lot to be desired. And so I started enlightened to try to kind of close that knowledge gap and ultimately to democratize access to that health care expertise, so that even somebody who is starting a company in health care because they've had maybe a personal illness or someone in their family has suffered from something or you know, they have gone through an experience like, you know, childbirth and postpartum and we need people that come from diverse backgrounds and experiences to innovate in the healthcare industry and it wanted to make sure that we're inspiring them to do that. But giving them the resources and access to the expertise that they need along that journey. And so that's what really propelled me into starving,...

...enlightened, I love it, give me a sense, I mean, give me a sense of like a user experience for somebody that's joining, let's say, to provide information or connect with others like Yeah, so we, I'll give you an example. We had a company that was in the very, very early days of founding, they were still kind of stealth phase and they were looking to found a company focused on remote patient monitoring, which is definitely one of the biggest sectors that we get companies starting from, you know, especially in light of covid right, figuring how to treat patients in their homes and monitor conditions remotely is really important. And so companies like that, what they do is they sign up for enlightened pay a subscription fee and then with that they have access to our network of health care professionals and providers. And the network itself is heavily curated. It's vetted, we take the time to get to know every one of the professionals in our network. We write a bio for them that's hosted on our site. And so this company came on and they created a company profile and then a project. Initially, what they wanted to do was engaged with a number of providers to talk about remote patient monitoring the market as a whole. What are some of the barriers to entry patient selection, you know, their experience in, you know, types of things to monitor sensors that were on the market today. And what they did was they created that project and then our tool gives them the opportunity to kind of search and engage for the relevant expertise and because we collect a lot of data on the members, we include things in their profile that would explain whether or not they have experience with remote patient monitoring, you know, along with their their specialty and their research bibliography and, you know, all of their kind of passions and interests and experience. And so they were able to search the people that they wanted to engage with kind of message them back and forth between our platform and...

...then ultimately create engagements to connect with them to talk about those various topics and they did an initial survey, you know, there's 10 really highly targeted providers and then they pulled out individuals from that survey and went more in depth and did some kind of U. X. And just really looking at, you know, the market itself and and digging in understanding a little bit more and you know, I think that it can kind of be addictive that you know, getting knowledge and understanding of market, you know that they can come back and would engage with someone again and you know, then okay I'm gonna talk to somebody different with a different perspective and we've had a ton of people come in and use the tool that way. And then, you know, we have companies that are large pharmaceutical companies that want to do things like focus groups or co design workshops and so they engage, you know, the members in our network in really, you know, various ways. It's so interesting. I like I have like 1000 questions about the two sided network there because right, like you need to get the doctors onto and that's that's probably hard, we'll dive into more if we have some time. But super interesting look, we always talk about, you know, hard work and luck being two factors to getting where you are like, I wonder if either of those apply to the origin stories and and co founding this company or any other part of your career, but yeah, I mean, you know, I think hard work and luck are part of any origin story, right? I mean, you don't get to, you know, the ceo and your career if you haven't had hard work and equally, so you have, you have to have a little bit of luck along the way. You know, I've had a little bit of both in my career. I definitely credit my work ethic for most of my success and a really hard worker. I've got a job since the day I turned 16 and, you know, worked multiple jobs throughout college. It's just something that has really, you...

...know, propelled me and I think that, you know, on one hand, I'm a proponent to kind of make your own luck, right? If you put in the work and if you are doing the right things then kind of materializes. But I have a couple of like, interesting stories that really explain kind of how I got to this piece of my career via hard work and luck. And one of them is uh, example of a company that I worked for in 2011, I started a role as the director of north american sales for a danish company. And during the interview process, they were discussing, you know, that they had nine reps kind of sdrs already selling the product that was a market leader in europe, but that needed to gain some steam in the U. S. And so basically I had talked to them about kind of coming in and taking over that team and continuously growing that product line. And the day I started they have had some leadership changes And they had let go of all nine SDrs. And I was also informed that the product line that they were focused on selling in the US had gone from around $11 million $5 million. Yeah. And I did a little bit of research and quickly realized that We weren't going to be getting any of that money back. You know that $6 million dollars was gone because there were some other manufacturers that have come into the space and cut the cost significantly. And you know, I think that the company I worked for was enjoying quite generous margins and and now they were exposed for that. And so I ultimately ended up looking at their manufacturing platform and identifying another product line that I could potentially take to market. And I went out and negotiate some GPO contracts if you're not in healthcare group purchasing contracts. And it's really a lot of the ways that hospitals determine the types...

...of supplies that are available and they put a band together to get better pricing from these entities. And then I was able to get some early winds and some negotiations on the contracts for the group purchasing organizations and I built a sales team and infrastructure around the new product line and went to the market with that and had some significant success. And I think that that was a hard work. It was one of the most difficult things I've done in my career and what it showed me was that I really liked to build things and I like to take something from scratch and really determine where the puzzle pieces sit and and grow it to be something that's, you know, fully functional. And since then I have gone on to grow and build sales teams and sales infrastructure for a number of companies. And that experience was what led me into doing this as a Ceo because I wasn't intimidated by building something from scratch because I was gonna say that was, that was definitely the seeds of you becoming a Ceo clearly and I think what a good example of a way in not a very progressive industry, but perhaps to be entrepreneurial in a company where you're not the Ceo, like you took something and were able to build, let's just say a mini ceo skill set in a lower risk environment than if you were to drop your job and say I'm going to go do it on my own. I can relate to that. I had a similar experience um, in my career where I got to build something up from the ground up, but my name wasn't on the masthead so to speak, but that is, that's given me all the confidence to do what I'm doing now because I knew I could do it under somebody else's dime, not doing it on my own, so to speak, so cool. And along the way, I'm sure, you know, to get those deals done, you learned a ton of sales and marketing tactics, give us one that you might uh you know, want to share. So I come from the world of...

...enterprise sales and for the majority of my career, I have sold into hospitals which are incredibly complex and bureaucratic organizations and they make all their decisions by committee. And I think that really in any type of enterprise sale, you're going to have a committee of people that are involved in making a decision. And for me, the one thing that I've always thought to take it back to when you're dealing with a lot of different people within a sale cycle is really understand like each individual person's win as it stands with the solution that you're bringing to the table. And it seems simple, you know, we do our discovery and we try to understand as much as possible about the deal. But everyone that's involved in that deal has to be motivated to some extent to help you move forward. And if you determine what they're kind of personal wind is then I think that is just such an incredible driver of your success, you know, and like the way I think of their win is you know, does it doesn't make their job easier. Are they going to save money in the budget? Will it help them hit their plan or a goal that they have? Maybe they'll get promotion? Right? So any person that is kind of involved in that process, whether they're somebody who's gonna sign or they're an economic buyer or they're just an influencer. Like how do they win by bringing your solution over the finish line? And I think that that is just something to think about, you know, obviously an enterprise sales, but you know, other types of sales as well, right? And just getting to the heart of like why does it matter for this person that I'm talking to because in the moment that's really all that matters right? It's that person, you know, to me sales has always been an emotional thing. Like getting its transference of emotion to me sales and so you're you're getting that person to emotionally connect with what is good for them by bringing in your solution. You'd love to think it's...

...altruism, but everyone is a status seeking monkey. I mean, you know, I'm sure that it's not the only reason people make decisions to bring in solutions, right? But it's always a part of it. And so it's there, if you're not thinking about it, you're missing a whole layer of data and information that you could be considering. I love it. Any positions you're hiring for. So we're not hiring in the moment, but very soon we will be hiring for a head of client success, interesting. That's a good role to be recruiting over a long period of time for a, for a startup. So cool, anybody interested obviously reached out to Shelly and then some shoutouts, anybody who you appreciate kind of what they're thinking is either in your space or just generally in sales. Yeah, I mean, I think, you know, in my space again, that's, you know, really where I tend to follow the most and um one of them is his name is Nick ill Christiane and he does this newsletter called out of pocket and for anybody that is interested in the health care space, even if you're a novice in health care, I think his newsletter is really excellent. He's also on twitter. His handle is I think at a killing it and uh he just gives like a really great breakdown of the health care industry in the United States and some of the like pitfalls and the types of industry models. I find it to be really engrossing and it's done at a level that if you don't know a lot about health care, it's still understandable. So I think that That's a really great one. And then here in Massachusetts, the digital medicine society is really great. They put out a lot of really interesting content in the healthcare space as well. Love it. Love it. All right. And, and last and most important you can do it up in boston if you want, you can do it anywhere. It doesn't matter. But you need to tell me a secret what's your like your favorite...

...spot that I should go eat next time I'm I'm traveling around the country. Oh gosh, okay. Well it's probably not a secret. Right? Um, I, so I'm, I live in boston and because of the last, you know year, so I haven't been doing a whole lot of travel because of Covid. So you know, if I would talk about my best, my favorite restaurants across the country. Unfortunately some of them have closed over the last couple of years. But there is a new place in boston that's called Contessa. It's on the rooftop of the Newbury hotel which is used a long, long time ago. It used to be the Ritz then it was the Taj. Now it's kind of regained its former glory as the Newberry and it's this insane italian restaurant on the top of the Newbury hotel and it's just a gorgeous restaurant and the food is amazing as well. Love it. All right, we're going up, we'll make our way to the enemy. I'm from new york. So the enemy country up in boston. Yeah, I love new york to and you know, I try to get to new york at least you know a handful of times a year. But you know last year you have to find you have to find that class somewhere because it's not up there and wow! Yeah, I'm just kidding. Uh huh. Great to have you on. I'm excited to follow your journey here. It's a super interesting company and like anywhere where you're trying to form a marketplace, if you will like this kind of, you know, two sided market place, it's uh they're always big bats and I think you've got something special. So super cool. Thank you for coming on. Thank you so much. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, rate and review in apple podcast or Spotify apps, send it to friends, hit the subscribe button, send it to other friends reminder. This episode is brought to you by Sandoz. So they deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make your outreach more. First. I had fun. Hope you did too. Now get out there and crush your numbers,...

Say something. Mhm.

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