The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 5 months ago

Ep 184: Influencer Marketing SaaS w/ Phoebe Maclachlan

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 184: Influencer Marketing SaaS w/ Phoebe Maclachlan

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Pavilion podcast and Happy New Year to you. I am your host, Brandon martin, you're listening to Is this a good time the show where I put Pavilion members on the hot tea, 15 minutes we hear their stories, it's kind of cool. Our guest today is Phoebe Mclaughlin, she's the VP of Services of Maverick. We talk about influencer marketing, sass. This episode is powered by show pad, the open end to end platform that makes Bdb buying and selling easier, transform your team to have high impact and differentiated customer conversations in today's environment. We want to see a revenue enablement technology that provides every customer facing team with required skills, knowledge and content to have impactful conversations with your buyers, head to show pad dot com to learn more. Alright, let's do this episode 88 is this a good time? Alright, everyone's so excited to have Phoebe Mclaughlin with us. She is the VP of Services at Maverick out of the boston chapter, Phoebe great to have you on the pod. Yeah, thank you so much for inviting me here. Glad to be here, awesome. We'll all meet no filler. We jump right in. Um tell us about you know your story and how you got to where you are. You you've been at Maverick for quite a bit at this point. Um you know at least in this day and age staying a company for six years. Super cool. Um but you started your career, not even necessarily in in sales or customer success or anything like that? I think you have such an interesting kind of beginning part of your professional career, so go ahead and tell it to bring us all the way back and then bring us forward. Yeah, so um so I'm actually the VP of services of Maverick as you mentioned, um and Mavericks and influencer marketing sas platform and we're headquartered here in boston and we connect some of the world's largest enterprise brands with content creators, uh you know, creators of all sizes um to deliver content at scale, and my team specifically is responsible for...

...delivering professional services to our clients and professional services is, you know, the strategy and execution um and delivery of these influencer collaborations um that's kind of my world within Maverick and you know, I've always had an entrepreneurial mindset I think, and so you know, when I started at Maverick, we were we were a very early stage startup and I think that kind of leans leans into anyone who's got an entrepreneurial background, you know, I had a fudge fudge business at one point, I ran a textbook business out of college and I think all of this uh skills, all these skills carried over into into a tech startup space, I love that, I love that. And so uh you joined Maverick is what, because you've made your way up there. Yeah, so I actually started at Maverick over six years ago as an individual contributor, as a customer success manager, um and when I joined, we were like really small team, I think I want to say we were a team of two people in customer success. Yeah and you know, there were like no processes or playbooks and we were all kind of like figuring it out as we went. Um And so I kind of took that opportunity, you know, as I was managing my own book of business as a CSM to start building out those processes and those playbooks where they didn't exist. Um I feel like that's kind of like my jam, I like to like build stuff and you know, organize the chaos. It's it's what I kind of get out of bed in the morning to do. Um Very cool. So I I did this and on the customer success side and you know, I felt like I got I got the team in a good place and then I started to shift my focus to what is now the services team. Um I found that we needed to kind of create this new um customer delivery team, a team really focused on the R. O. I. And the strategy a little separate from from what our customer success team did. Um so I built this services team from a team of one which was just me to a team of 21 where we are today. So we've definitely seen a lot of scale on the team and um you know, I think...

...for anyone kind of growing in the ranks in the company, like there's a lot of stuff you're just not going to know. Um and there's a lot of stuff I didn't know, I didn't know what I was doing, but there's also a lot of stuff that I had a lot of confidence in what I was doing too. So um I think it's really important when you're faced with those types of situations to like lean on your network, um you know, lean on the community that you have to kind of ask those questions and help you navigate through this through this uncharted territory, so to speak. Yeah. And it's also sounds like, you know, if you're if you're younger in your career and like go and document things and and like suggest processes and you're eventually gonna get tapped to start running those processes and running those people. I I love that little tidbit for people that are looking like how how do I get promoted? Just like do the work, you know? Exactly, yeah. Find, find, find those gaps, find those those gray areas and and start to build stuff. That's that's cool. And so for for maverick, Right, um It's a it's a it's a platform. So is it SAs or is it kind of like project based? Yeah, it is SAs um so all of our customers purchase an annual license or longer to to leverage our software um and then my team helps develop influencer strategies. So, you know, I think influencer marketing is still kind of a nuanced marketing tactic for a lot of brands still been around for a while at this point, but we have found that a lot of brands are still like, okay, great, I want to do influencer marketing, but how um and so that's where my team steps in to kind of help them navigate the how All right for somebody who's listening who has that exact question, like what's a what's a pretty generic playbook um you know, for how to implement like an influencer marketing marketing strategy. I mean because right, there's I work in the world of restaurant tech and as probably listeners know, I've said that before, blah blah blah, but like I've often thought there are definitely people who are influencers in our space and like thought leaders who I'd love...

...to tap, so to speak. I mean like, I wonder, I wonder if you had any kind of generic advice on how to do something that's basically a new style of of influencing market, especially if it came to be to be right B to C. It's kind of straightforward uh you know, get people on instagram who have lots of followers to like your ship. Okay, cool. But like is there a B two B strategy that that kind of stands out um you know, it's a really great question. I'm I think a lot of brands are starting to tap into that from a B to B side, you know, whether using, whether they're using um, influencers in like from linkedin for example, and having them create blog content around specific software tools, um that's where I can kind of see this evolving from the Bdb standpoint and yeah, like you said, B two C is pretty, pretty self explanatory, you know, if you have have creators or influencers who are already using your products or are already using, you know, your software, your brand or whatever it is, um, tap into them most of the time, they're really excited to hear from you and they want to work with you? Um I think the most recent development is like pay creators and influencers for their time and their value. I think a lot of brands right now are trying to still pay influencers, you know, through product and these, these individuals have to earn a living and a career off of what they're doing, so yeah, that's not, that's not, don't send people, so don't give them money. Um what would last question, because I'm just like intrigued by it? Um, I guess this is personal for me, right, when do I become an infant, When when am I an officially an influencer? How many followers is an influencer? Or like, oh Man, influences in the eye of the beholder, I guess it's, it totally depends. And, you know, at Maverick, we work across a span of influence from people that have, like 10,000 followers to people that have millions of followers, because I think you have to look at influence and, and content creation a little bit differently, right? Content creation is generating...

...this incredible content that a brand can maybe repurpose and sometimes influence doesn't need to be a factor of that. Um whereas you have these influencers who can, who can really pass that word of mouth uh and and promote your product and get the word out there and bring brand awareness. Now. We haven't talked about this, but just what's coming to my mind is the whole name, image and likeness stuff that's happening in college sports. Is that, does that touch into this now, where where, you know, that that comes into play where you can actually get college athletes and things like that, who have lots of influence amongst maybe their university or their region. Oh, I mean, it's totally a place that, that you should focus on. Um we are kind of defining the playbook for that right now as, as a company, you know, we want to make sure we come with with the strategy and the best practices to provide to all our customers, but yeah, I think it's really exciting, you know, being a former athlete myself, like having an opportunity to promote yourself and like make money from it. That's pretty cool. Yeah, it certainly is and, and I know this, you had played tennis when you touch on that real quick. You had actually a pretty cool career in it. Yeah so you know I actually I'll take it like way back. When I was in high school I started to realize the potential I had for tennis and you know I went to my parents and I was like all right I want to go big on this like this is my passion and you know I had the whole conversation with my parents of okay do I forego college and because you know once you start playing professionally you lose N. C. Double A. Eligibility. And you know my my dad he's a he's a retired doctor and you know very much cares about education um as he should and he kind of gave me the thumbs up and was like look your your body is only going to be as young and nimble as it is for for this long so go for it and you can always go back to college. Um So I ended up going to online high school for two years um Really focused on traveling and going to all the...

...tournaments that I needed to go to to help boost my ranking. Um And then after I got my my degree from my online high school which I don't know if it even exists anymore. Um The high school after I got my degree then I went and I played professional for four years and I traveled all over the world. I played in every continent outside of Antarctica? Um and it was just the most incredible experience, wow, that is awesome. You were like the original covid learner, right? Like remote learning. Yeah, when they're like work from home, I was like got it, no problem, no problem. I was doing, I was doing homework in Budapest, you know? Well it's super cool. Well look, you know, I always talk about luck and hard work contributing to getting people where they are. I wonder if, you know, if there are any, you know, moments of luck or I mean maybe even that conversation with your parents where you got to got an outcome, but like anything that stands out moments where, you know, we're really pivotal to getting you to where you are today. Yeah, I mean I think there's there's a lot of moments right that got me to this point and I do like to look at you know, hard work and luck as it relates to success. And I try to shift the narrative a little bit on success. And instead of thinking of just success, I like to think of what are the metrics that you're striving for when you think of success? You know, what are you trying to achieve? Because without those, like how do you know if you succeeded? Um and when I think about success, I like to think of my favorite failure. Um So I actually had a coworker of mine asked this question in the interview to a candidate, she said, what is your favorite failure? I thought to myself, I was like, oh, I like that, like what would I say if I were in that situation? Um and I have to say my favorite failure is is my tennis career, because you know, I I set out with the goal of being top 10 in the world, with making a living off of my career that was success for me,...

...and you know, I'll save you all the gory details of the different injuries and the hard travel schedules and everything and you know, lo and behold, I didn't Meet my success goal, I was not successful in being top 10 and you know, making a living off my career and so I failed. Um but like, I would never change anything that I did uh that process, I have zero regrets, I'm so glad I went through that journey. And so that's why I call it my favorite failure. I like that, that's great. I mean all of us are sitting here rolling our eyes going, that's not a failure. But um you know, I love the mentality of striving to be, you know, the best and if you come up short, it's still going to be worth it. I mean, I think that applies everywhere. Well while speaking of kind of things that people can put into practice. I mean, I wonder, you know, if there's like a sales or marketing tactic or even customer success tactic um that that you think people overlook that, that they could potentially use, that that's in your playbook. So I don't know, this will be a little bit past just like a general sales marketing customer success tactic and it's probably more of like a general principle. Um and I think I would share, you know, don't stick to the boundaries that you're given, whether it's in your role or you know, your job description. Um and and understand that growth isn't just linear, right? And you know, growth can happen in so many different ways, whether it's in your favorite failure or not, and uh you know, I can expand on this a little bit and bring it back to my own personal life experience. Um so about three years ago when I was the Director of services at Maverick, I kind of hit my own inflection point where uh you know, I realized I was needing more and I wasn't sure what was next for me and I got the services team to this point where we were just a really well oiled machine and but I myself was like feeling stagnant, you know, and so I left the services team and I joined our...

...finance and operations team for a year. And yeah, it was like it was totally against my comfort zone and character and was like, oh my gosh, I'm leaving like a sure thing to go into something else that I have no idea what I'm doing, but I as a director, I wanted that BP title, I wanted to be able to make an impact in the organization and I needed to shift my focus from being like my own services bubble to be able to impact the whole company. Um so I joined this finance and operations team. I got visibility into how other teams worked with each other, how my team impacts those other teams, how um sales and marketing, you know, collaborator don't collaborate together. And I think by doing that, um it just left me a better leader and a better teammate, a better co worker, you know, and best, better cross collaborator with everyone else. So after that year I went back to services and you know, here I am today, I love it, you know that you know, um I've mentioned this to people who listen, you know, I I played a little sports in my life as well and I think I think that's a very um athletes mentality in this way because that that doesn't translate over to like a business mentality. Sometimes often the advice is like be an expert in one thing and go forward and yet um as you certainly know as an athlete, you need a forehand, you need a back end, you need a net game, you need to serve like you there's not just one and and often you're working on the thing that you do least. Well not not the thing you do best and it's it is to somewhat be a generalist of the game and if you take a look outside of like CS and the silo of sales and silo marketing like being like the generalists are the people who are going to be able to manage all those things at the top and I don't think that's often advice that's given to people to slide over to other departments and try it out. Maybe sales and marketing more but like to slide into finance and operations that you know I've talked to hundreds of people in the pod you don't hear that often. So yeah I like that advice. That's that's super cool. Well look you know...

...any any key positions that you are hiring for because I'm sure people want to join your team and be a part of your leadership. Yeah my team is great. So I'm definitely hiring for my team. I think I have four open job rex right now for to program manager roles and to program coordinator roles. Um And both of both of these roles are customer facing. And this is again like I said before you're managing the strategy and the R. O. I. For for our customers. So um you get to touch a lot of different pieces and then um Maverick is also hiring engineers and sales directors, every single company is hiring engineers, and if you are an engineer listening, come talk to me and then you can talk to me no, I'm just kidding. Always the case. Any any shout outs to give to folks or content or things that have inspired to you. Yeah, I actually just came across this podcast by Greg Mcewan. Um so he writes this book or he's the author of this book called Essential is um um and I think the books a little bit older, I want to say it was like written in 2014, um but it's just like really relevant for where we are today um in this whole like work from home style, where you know work and life just blend together. And the book talks about, you know, being able to identify what's essential in life and being able to uh in order to be able to do that you have to give yourself time and space and um the most impactful part of this part of the story um is that you have to make trade offs in any decision you make, and it's shifting the narrative from what am I giving up when I do this trade off to what am I going to go big on, and I don't know, I just thought that was that was a really cool way to to shift that perspective and unless but not least something important to me me a great restaurant that I don't know about. Okay, so it's it's funny you asked because last week my husband we have our our six year anniversary coming up and he was like, what's your favorite restaurants in Chicago? And I was like, well I'd love to go back to...

...my favorite restaurant of all time, which is unfortunately in Rio de janeiro. Yeah. And you know, I went to this place in 2014 when I was there for the FIFA World Cup and they just make the most phenomenal pizza. They have like this mozzarella and this olive top nod and it's like, you know the whole wood fire pizza oven thing. So um I don't know if you're planning on going to Rio soon, but if you are, there's this place called bras Pizzeria wow, I'm gonna tell sam I gotta go open the Rio Pavilion office. Love it. Cool Phoebe so great to chat with you, incredible to to hear your story and excited to just you know, follow along as you keep continue crushing. Yeah, thanks so much for having me All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, make your New Year's resolution to rate and review shows you like how about that? Send it to some friends or smash that subscribe button. The pavilion podcast is powered by show pad for opportunity preparation or opportunity, execution Chopin has everything your team needs to add value, provide insights and engage with your customers want to learn more about show pad, head to www dot show pad dot com. For a personal assessment of your enablement journey, I had so much fun today. I hope you did too. Now get out there, start the year right and go hit those numbers. Yeah.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (241)