The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

Ep 70: Sales in Industries that Help People w/ Allison Walsh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 70: Sales in Industries that Help People w/ Allison Walsh

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello, everyone, and welcome to therevenue collected podcasts. I am your host, Brandon Martin, and you'relistening to Is this a good time? Show our ask Revenue Collective members somereally basic questions, and they have incredible answers. In a short, 15minute conversation, we really shows on Tuesdays and Thursdays each week. So ifyou hit subscribe, I will send a carrier pigeon to your house to dropoff the shows each week. Pretty amazing. Our guest today is Alison Walsh. She'sthe VP of business development at Advanced Recovery Systems, and we talkabout how to navigate sales and industries that are out there just tohelp people improve their lives. This episode was brought to you by QuotaPath, a commission tracking software built for sales, operations, financeand accounting teams. If running commissions and payroll has you runningfor the hills, quota path is for you. Quote. A path helps organizations trackand manage commissions and pay their teams accurately and on time every time.Keep your team motivated a non target. Simplify your commissions at quarterpast dot com slash revenue dash collective. Give your reps the gift oftransparency. All right, let's see this episode 23. Is this a good time? Allright. We are here today with Alison while she is the VP of businessdevelopment at Advanced Recovery Systems. Alison, I'm so excited to haveyou on the podcast. Thank you so much for having me. I'm glad to be here. Ihave a good streak now of picking people who have their own podcast. Youhave your own. Let's get the plug in right up front. I appreciate that. Yeah.So I started that she believed she could podcast back in March of 2020. Soas an outlet, something for me to pour my heart and soul into and increasedpositivity everywhere during the pandemic. And I love it keeping up withit. Great. Well, I hope everyone goes and subscribe. Smash the subscribebutton, Browse. And we would love that. But now that will be the only diversion.All meat, no filler. Let's get right...

...into the questions. You've had a prettyincredible career and and some really interesting parts of in my opinionalong the way. Tell us about it. How did you get to where you are today?Absolutely. So I actually started on the nonprofit side. I started afoundation for eating disorder prevention when I was 18, so that wasreally like my entry point into behavioral health during that time. Meta lot of great people, had a lot of wonderful experiences, helped to save alot of lives. It was really fulfilling thought that I wanted to be an attorney,right? And so during that time went to law school and was pursuing it figuredout quickly that we really only needed one lawyer in the household. That couldbe my husband. I didn't need to do that. I didn't want to practice and somebodythat I had met during, you know, my years running the foundation reachedout and said, Hey, we've got this business development job in healthcareBehavioral health Is anybody on your board looking for a position? And Isaid, You know what I am? And so I took a job. It was at the University ofFlorida and their recovery center. That was in partnership with Orlando Health,which is a huge hospital system in central Florida, and uh, really, that'show it started. I was there for a year. All of a sudden there was anopportunity on my plate to join a startup, which is advanced recoverysystems, backed by incredible people that have had wonderful careers in thehealthcare industry. And they took a bet on me and I took a leap of faith,and here we are. So eight years later, it was the second person hired for 1000people strong. You have nine locations or in six states were about to reallyget into the text space. So it has been one heck of a journey but incrediblyfulfilling. And I love the fact that I get to help people every single day ontheir journeys become a better version of themselves, whether they're takingthat step in recovery, whether they're on my team and we're pouring resourcesinto them, helping them be better and stronger or we're helping the community.So it's incredibly fulfilling work. That's awesome. It seems like that is atheme in your career is that you've...

...always taken positions that are alsohelping people right, like helping others in society, which I think isjust incredible and certainly very honorable. I also was kidding. When Iwas checking out your LinkedIn, you just became a member, a official memberof the Forbes B D Council. All of these give me Give me a 30 seconds on this.I'm part of the Forbes thing that they seem kind of round up really smartpeople and then just steal their opinions for news stories. What is this?Well, I love any time I get to share my opinion or my voice and like so youknow, I really think it's important for anybody that is really in an industrythat maybe doesn't have a lot of awareness or recognition around eventhe business development or sales process, to lend their voice to sharewith others how you can contribute your talents in different ways. And so forme, being a part of the Forbes Business Development Council, it does give me anopportunity to shine a light that there's this whole other industry thatyou can be involved in from a sales perspective. I mean, I think about myearly years and sales and visit up. It was almost like a bad word like sales.You're saving lives or health care like that's not kosher here, like no thereis. And we've defined how you know the right way of doing it and a reallywonderful and ethical way of doing it. And I want to invite more people inright. I'm always looking for new talent. I'm always looking for peoplethat want to get involved with our organization. So it gave me anothergreat platform to be able to do that. Cool. Very cool. Love it. I lookforward to reading your bylines in Forbes. I'm sure coming soon. So look,it takes hard work as well as luck. To have success in life would love a storyfrom either or both on moments of hard work and moments of luck that got me towhere you are, right? Absolutely. I mean, there's a ton, right? So I thinkeven anybody that's been involved with the startup knows that you're going towork so much harder than what you ever...

...anticipated in order to make big thingshappen because you're literally putting the infrastructure inflicts, right?Like I don't think everyone who works in startups knows this. I think Repeatthis right, like you are going to work harder with less resources than youever had, and hopefully there's going to be some big outcome at the end. Butexactly what? We're going to cut you off. I just That is not a given. Yeah,so I initially was like, Oh, this is great. I've got this cool new job I getto build a team. This is wonderful. But when your employee number two, you haveto figure it all out, right? So, you know, I wear all the hats. In thebeginning, I was Biz Dev sales Marketing. I did all the things right,website, Like I've been somebody that's always, like, accumulated a lot ofskills, which is a good thing, but it can also, like, leave me down lots ofrabbit holes. And so, uh, you know, fun facts like html was my foreign languagein college. So, like, I was like, Sure, I can help with website stuff like,let's do this, you know? So it was a lot in the beginning, but then watchingit grow to like figuring out what we needed to do to either reinventourselves, revamp our process, level up like always taking that opportunity togo back to the drawing board and never, ever, ever operating with thismentality of like, it's good enough right. We are trying to be the best,right, so we don't have to be the biggest in our space. But we do have tobe the best. That is the expectation. We create our lanes and a lot of ways.We've created joint ventures and partnerships that are way outside ofwhat other behavioral health companies have done, and there's so many othercool things to come. But when you do things differently, you have to learnhow to set up your organization differently to you have to learn how tobuild out different divisions, how to adapt, maybe some models that work inother industries or service lines, but make it what it needs to be for yours,especially if it's a non traditional sale, right? So there's so many timesover the last eight years, especially...

...where I've had to look at what othersare doing but then figure out how to make it work in our version, right, andthat takes a lot of trial and error. It takes a lot of guts, a lot of courage.Every single time you put yourself out there in any way, right, it brings up alot of you know emotions and and concerned. But then when it works, it'sso freaking awesome. And that's I think what I love is that a few years ago wecompletely redid the way that we handle our business development teameverything down to the nuts and bolts again. And you know that That made menervous in a lot of ways, right? I was like my team gonna leave, right? I'vegot a lot of seasoned sales pros. They're great. They could be sitting onthe beach, eat bonbons right now, But this is actually gonna make them workharder in the beginning to adapt to this, you know? Are they going to trustall this training? Are they going to give it a shot? Right, Is this going toactually produce results? And thankfully, I can say they all stayed.It attracted better talent. And we're actually crushing it in a way biggerway than we were before. So, you know, that's been really cool. But hard work,right? Like not being afraid to be vulnerable and put yourself out thereand say, You know what? I think we need to do it differently this time. Andthankfully, the visiting team has continued to be a really huge force inour organization and put up great numbers. And we're able to do a lotmore things because we're able to consistently deliver. I love that. Well,look, why don't you give us a secret on how you guys are putting out such greatnumbers? Um, give us a tactic that people can use. I mean, obviously, thisis a interesting kind of segment of sales, right? Like, but the tacticsthey apply, right? So what's what's the trick you can give our listeners thatthey can use tomorrow? Well, I mean, we pivot quickly, right? So, I mean, Ithink last year everybody had to learn how to virtually sell nobody in thefield ever signed up to be an inside sales person. All of a sudden, we'vegot a team full of SDRs that never wanted to be SDRs. And so, thankfully,we have a lot of people that like to be...

...front people, they're not afraid to beon camera. So leveraging that we use video emails and all of our cadence isnow follow up like I'm a huge fan of Bom Bom like we use that all of thetime, so baking things into cadences, we also have invested a lot in DataAnalytics. So, you know, we're seeing the trend seeing what people areresponding to, seeing how we can increase the activation of accounts forour, you know, our reps and everything that you know. That whole realm hasmade such a big difference just investing in the data and thevisibility to see what's actually working. Whatever platform that worksfor you do it right like scheduled. The demos figure it out. But if you'rehiding from data right now, you're doing it blind. And there's just somany resources out there. And, you know, I just think about what we're doing andhow we're actually able to model our accounts and really forecast and trackbetter than anybody else. I know in our industry, right? There's a lot ofreally smart people out there that are doing this in other spaces, but not inour space. And so it's been really, really cool to be able to do that andto also see the impact of things like implementing video right, implementingdifferent things in cadences, tightening them up, changing them,based on virtual selling versus in person and then creating a productivitymodel and a hybrid model. Because not all my reps are going to go back out inthe field. A lot of our accounts won't even let us in anymore, right? Likemaybe they moved to places where they don't even sell to give me the videocase, right? Like, are you saying that? You know, even 1st 1st email out tosomebody dropping a video in absolutely, with a paddle in their name on it Andyeah, I've got I have I haven't implemented it in my own organization.If I I've gotten them, I've gotten some from, like, a customer successstandpoint, like getting on boarded onto something like That's kind of fun,But I used to want to throw up by getting one when I got one. And now Idon't until maybe Sarah zoom all day and like, it's totally fine. You know,it's a lot, so I know it helps us get the meetings. You know, we've We'vetried to get into a lot of accounts in...

...the past via phone call via regularemail. We don't get it. All of a sudden, we throw in the video with their nameon the placard and a time to meet, and all of a sudden it gets scheduled. Andthen you add in you layer in other tools that work for you, whether it'schallenge Lee or whatever you can do to make it as efficient for people to bookthe meeting with you and they feel special already, it's a win win. Yeah,I'm not in the calendar camp, but that's a totally different podcasts.All right, now we're in the speed round. Um, what's a key position you're hiringfor who? Inside BT. So SDRs were also scaling our field team as well. But theinside team is going to be critical because we are moving into the textspace so thrilled to be able to build out the inside selling to employers,unions, larger organizations. But I'm going to need a rock solid rock solidteam on the end. Okay, And is that is that local in Orlando where you are oris that anywhere remote, beautiful. Love it, love it, love it great, andgive some shout outs. Who do you appreciate their content that they putout? You put out your own content. So shout out you you know who Who do youlike to listen to that gives you inspiration? So I mean, of course, theusual suspects between Max and say I'm Of course they're fantastic. ButMichael Hansen is just an awesome human and somebody that I connected with whenwe were first starting to put our str strategy in place. He's just beenamazing just as a go to resource. But he also puts out great content onLinkedIn. He's always really active. I also really admire Heather Monahan. Shewrote The Confidence Creator. And so she's all about really putting yourselfout there being bold. But she's got a really good history and solid historyof selling, and she's all about sales leadership. So follow her a lot. Andthen I'm a huge fan of Shannon Monsen and Sami Ramadani. They started the CEOschool, but Shannon talks a lot about selling, and she puts out really goodcontent on her own Instagram as well as on the CEO school Instagram Yeah, andCEO school. Is it female focused? I...

Yeah, great. Thank you. Tramp here. Shebelieves she could Yeah, you know, like all these. You know, I'm a huge fan offemale empowerment and equipping the next generation of women as I am. II've said this on the podcast. Often, I believe very self serving Lee womenwork harder than men and do a better job than men in so many ways. So I Ihave I have a history of this, and, uh, I really want to start to see theindustry shift more to a 50 50 in sales like it's not there yet, but we'regetting there. And then we'll start tackling engineering and some of theseother places that it's not the case, but longer lead time for that. Butthank you to leaders like you who are paving the way I appreciate that. Andlook, this is the most important question to me. Last but not least, Iam a restaurant person I crave going out to eat. I hope by the time peoplelisten to this, the world's open up again. Maybe it won't be. Who knows,tell us where we should eat. So we have really cool, quaint restaurants incentral Florida. But one of our favorites, like a date night escape, isthis little tiny place in Winter Garden, Florida called the chef's table, andyou've got reservations. But it is such an incredible experience. You know, allthe courses you could want wine parents, et cetera, if you like. But it's just areally beautiful spot. It doesn't matter if you going at five o'clock oreight o'clock. I find myself going at five o'clock just because I'm like, Ineed a date night with my husband and I gotta be home before the babysitter hasto go. So you know, But you even feel like you're just so removed from theworld. And the customer service is awesome. Food spectacular. I love that.And babysitter. Is that for kids? Yes, three of them. So I'm not whole 94 andtwo, Okay, so I should just ask this to everyone up front. I want to shout outparents that are hustling in the way that they are to get where you are andto be a parent on the way, and I definitely give more credit to themothers and the fathers. It's just incredible. I I just I see what my wifedoes with us having two kids, and I are...

...having a career. The sacrifices thatyou make on both ends of that are impossible to quantify. And and yet ithappens every day and people don't talk about enough. And I just like shots ofthat, like, so cool and you are You are deserving of this amazing meal atChef's Table, and I can't wait to go there myself down to Florida. It'sbeautiful right now. We'd love to have you taken the chef's table. I love it.I love it. Alison, thank you for sharing your past with us and whereyou're going. So cool to hear about it and looking forward to kind of cheeringyou on from afar. Thank you so much. All right, that's our show. Thank youso much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in theApple Podcast and Spotify app. Send it to some friends or smash that subscribeButton yourself shows us love anyway, a reminder that this episode was broughtto you by quarter past quarter Path is the first radically transparent end toend compensation solution from sales reps to finance get started for free atquarter past dot com slash revenue Dash collective, that is quote a path dotcom slash revenue Dash Collective. I had a lot of fun today. I hope you did,too. That go across your numbers. Say something? Mm hmm. Yeah.

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