The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 3 months ago

Ep 99: Tactical Advice To Humanize Your Sales & Marketing w/ Tyler Lessard

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tactical Advice To Humanize Your Sales & Marketing w/ Tyler Lessard, VP Marketing at Vidyard 

Part of the "Thank God It's Monday" (TGIM) Series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Thank God it's monday and welcome backto the revenue collective podcast. This is where revenue leaders come to learnthe tips, the tactics and strategies to grow as a leader in their high growthcompanies. I'm tom Alamo. I'm your host. Really excited about today's podcastand we've got as a guest and some of the content here. Before we get to that,let's give a quick shout out to our sponsor. This episode is brought to youby drift. More than 50,000 businesses use drift to grow revenue and increasecustomer lifetime value faster drift, helps their customers align sales andmarketing on a single platform to deliver a unified customer experiencewhere people are free to have a conversation with a business at anytime on their terms, learn more at drift dot com. And you know, shoutoutto I've had Julian Thompson, head of sales development from drift. I hadDavid cancel ceo drift on this podcast. Great people over there. So shout outto them for today's conversation. We're talking about humanizing the sales andmarketing process and what better way to do that than through video. Got theking of video here. Uh Tyler Lassard. He's the VP of marketing at Vidyard.He's been there for a good 7.5 years now helping to build out this market.But he's got over 15 years of experience and B two B marketing. He'sthe host of the creating connections show. He's the author of the VisualSale. He is a fearless 50 marketer via Marcato, a telly award winner and he'sreally most well known for helping to create the video industry and B two Bmarketing and sales. We had a great conversation about his career journey,but also got really tactical and house sales and marketing teams can use videoeffectively in their day to day processes. So let's get straight to myconversation with Tyler. All right, Tyler. Good morning. Welcome to thepodcast. How are you? Oh, it's an absolute pleasure to be here. I amdoing great. I live just outside of Toronto and spring slash summer is inthe air. So I'm doing well. My friend. That's awesome. That's awesome. Is thatwhere you're from originally? Like the Toronto area? I am. I live about anhour west of Toronto in Kitchener Waterloo. I've actually been born andraised here and locally there is the University of Waterloo, which is one ofthe top engineering schools in north America and I had the opportunity to goto that school as part of my university degree. I'm an engineer by trade andwhen you live in Waterloo, the schools right here, you don't go too far andeverything just played out from there. But it's a great place to be right now.Yeah, that's awesome. That's awesome. I got a lot to get into with you todayand I always love to kind of hear the backstory of folks and you justmentioned you're an engineer by trade. What people know you most by nowadaysis being, you know, an outstanding market or one of the best in the B twoB world. So I'd love to talk a little bit about your come up story, so tospeak. I know you start at Deloitte went to, you know, you're at Blackberryfor a good decade before you got like more into the start up world. So talkto me a little bit about coming out of school and some of those originaldecisions to go at some of those larger companies and how that was going. Yeah.So to your point when I graduated back 20 years ago in 2001, I had engineeringdegree at the University of Waterloo with a focus in on areas like softwareand system development than a lot of different technical roles in myprevious lives. And I joined, had the opportunity to join Blackberry orResearch in Motion at the time for all of you, young listeners out there. No,it's not the fruit, it was the original smartphones or iphones and androiddevices. So very proud of that and I had the chance to work there for for 10years. And in my initial rollout, Blackberry actually started in theirdeveloper support team working with third party developers who werebuilding literally the first generation of mobile applications. Again, this wasback before we even had data on our on...

...our day to day phones. And it was areally remarkable experience, an opportunity to be part of an entirekind of industry movement. And what I what I learned very quickly was that Imuch more enjoyed the external facing part of that role of working with thirdparty developers in a support capacity and enablement capacity and then almostan evangelism capacity. I went out and I spoke a lot about our developer toolsthat recruited developers and I was much better at that. I found that I wasan actual coding, which was sort of a start to my shift in my career, throughinto business development and eventually as the marketing leader.Yeah, that's amazing. And how did you come across Vidyard? So after my decadeof blackberry, I spent a few years at another startup that was in a mobilesecurity space and I joined that organization as CMO. And you know, wegrew that company from about 30 people to about 230. and then I had theopportunity to come over here to Vidyard and it was an interesting onebecause I had no real background in video and you know, coming into it,what drew me so much to it however, was as a marketer, you know, I recognizethat of course video as a content medium is going to become more and moreimportant in terms of how we deliver our message. Is it was very clear eventhen that that was going to be a growing trend. Vidyard had an amazingplatform, but even more importantly, amazing set of partnerships, thestrategic partnerships with Salesforce and Marcato and Oracle and others andthen the team was just absolutely incredible and the leadership and rightthrough the organization. So I had the opportunity to join their through someconnections where I got introduced and here we are seven years later, anotherlifetime and I just can't imagine myself anywhere else. Yeah, I'm curiouslike what you, if you can recall, you know, seven years ago, what stage waswas the company at in terms of like employee size and and how far theyprogressing like what caught your eye because seven years ago, you know,video people weren't even using like a zoom video, right? It was hisconference calls, let alone videos in prospecting or in their emails ormarketing campaigns probably. So what kind of stuck out to you? Is that beingkind of the one of the next big waves in the sales and marketing world? Yeah.Well a little known fact for all of you in the sales community is that big yardstarted and you know, as a video hosting management and publishingplatform. And we still are today. So a huge part of our business is as a fullstack video platform for businesses. So we have always, and since I joined thatwas our primary focus and in fact our only focus. So we started by servicingmarketing teams and I. T. Teams who needed better ways to host and managetheir video content that they were creating to publish that content onlineon their websites and social properties and be able to track back moreanalytics and data about those videos. Because at that point most companieswe're still just using Youtube as they're hosting platform and even thevideos across their website, we're all Youtube embedded videos. And while thatwas the quick and easy and free way to do things it was very disconnected fromhow all the other content in a business was managed right? Like you would neverhost all of the pdf you put on your website, on some third party service orthe forms you put and so on. And so we saw this sort of great groundswell overthe first few years of more and more marketing teams embracing video to telltheir stories, to educate their audiences. And we had a purpose builtplatform to really support that. So for the first four years or so it wasexclusively working with marketing and I. T. Teams. But then a number of yearsago we were almost backed into this area of video and sales where we builtdown almost a prototype tool for our own sales team to enable them to recordand send custom videos to their prospects. Because we were hearingfeedback from them saying, Hey, you know when I reached out to a prospect,they're saying if video is so great,...

...why didn't you send me a video? And webuilt down tools for our own sales team to make it easy for them to record andsend videos as part of their prospecting. And it caught on likewildfire. The response from prospects was through the roof. And we theninvested in actually turning it into a full fledged product and here we aretoday, it's now the fastest growing part of our business and in 2020 maybe.Not surprisingly, we saw it just absolutely skyrocket and use acrosssales teams. Yeah, I was gonna ask about that. You know, how the businesswas affected by covid probably positively effective because, you know,as a salesperson myself, I I really took pride in that when there was an inperson meeting. I thought that was something that did particularly well.The prep, the report that you build, you know, having that type of presencein a meeting is, is a skill and I felt like I kind of had to make up for thatin other ways. In a covid world where everything is through email or slack orzoom and video is definitely a way to do that. So I'd love to hear you talk alittle bit about your opinion on that. Just like in this new world where we'renot meeting face to face, at least not currently how videos is helping tobridge the gap there. Well, needless to say it was a pretty wild year in a lotof different ways and particularly in this evolution of the use of video anda few different things happened. And to your point, we've seen just this hyperrapid adoption of these tools now that we are all not only remote selling butour prospects are remote buying and even their decision making teams aredistributed and remote. And so there's other reasons why we need to sort ofadapt to their style and reasons why recorded videos are working really well.But you know what a couple of the big things that we saw. So first of all toyour point when it comes to sales, I mean, you can't replace the human face,right? You just can't replace those personal interactions that make you Theperson that you are, that earn trust, that demonstrate empathy. All of thesethings that we know that make face to face conversation so powerful in thesales world. And in the last 18 months we've shifted to everything beingvirtual. We're all trying to get as many video calls as we can becausethat's the first and easiest replacement for in person meetings. Butthen there's this recognition of, well, that's not the only way I can putmyself out there and let people see me, hear me, get to know me and get totrust me. Because the tools in parallel had evolved to make it simple to hitthe record button. And a tool like a vidyard, record a video using your webcamera, screen share and email it over to somebody. So the tools have becomereally easy to use to do that. So we saw this great sort of like all theconditions came together because also last year, everybody figured out webcamps, it's kind of funny to say. But you know, a couple of years ago, mostpeople were still not super enthused about turning on their web cam, butthat all changed again last year. So all these conditions kind of bubbled upto helping people embrace video a lot more, make them feel more comfortableon video. And then the tools to just hit the record button, record somethingand send it just became simple to use. So it's kind of a perfect storm for theadoption of these kinds of tools. But the last piece of it, which is possiblyeven the most interesting and important is that the expectations of ourcustomers also changed dramatically. Right? Going back a few years, a lot ofus would have been little hesitant and uncomfortable recording a video. Maybewe're working at home and where we don't feel like it's professional torecord a video where we're not super polished or something like that. Whenall the other video out there was this high end produced content. But thereality is now today, here time and time again that the more authentic andsimple the content the better. So the fact that our audiences now are reallygravitating towards this and you can record a video in your bedroom at thekitchen counter. It doesn't matter and send it over and people will respond tothat, it will resonate with them. So again, I think even our audienceexpectations change. So again, I think that was part of this perfect storm tomake this such an important tool. So uh I want to spend some time in aminute going through some different...

...tactical questions around when you usevideo, maybe in certain scenarios. But before we do that for the marketersthat are listening again seven years ago, 7.5 years ago, video was notmainstream at all in the sales and marketing process. So I'd love to hearyou talk about as a marketer, how you help too kind of create and educate themarket on that. And probably while using video to do that, I would imagine,I'd love to just hear you talk about how you've created so much mindsharebecause nowadays it seems like at least if you check linked in everyone'stalking about how important it is to use video and prospecting or they havetheir selfie camera like while they're walking to get their coffee in themorning or whatever it is. So I'd love to hear about how you helped to kind ofbuild that, that mind share. Yeah, well it's, it's been great to be a part of abusiness that genuinely believes from the top down that true thoughtleadership, that being helpful and serving the community is more importantthan selling to the community, right? And a lot of us get that and we feel it,but it's very rare to be a part of an organization that genuinely leans intothat that believes that invests in it. And it's something that actuallyattracted me from day one when meeting the executives here because they werereally all in on that and they felt, you know what? We've got to build amarket here, It's not about building Vidyard, it's about building the videomarket and we'll build the best products, don't you worry? Tyler willbuild the best products that when people come needing a better solutionfor video, because we've built up that demand will be the best ones to servethem. And so it really starts with having that mindset of how important itis to serve and support the community out there and help them be successfulfrom that. You then say, well, if we're going to do that, we need to genuinelyinvest in content in thought leadership in having people in the business whounderstand the market, who are and can develop into experts who can find outwhat's working for others and share those back into the community. Andagain it sounds so simple, but most marketing teams don't invest in havingpeople who are actually dedicated to that. They have content marketers whoare writing but they're typically S. E. O. Experts and they learn the marketbut their focus still tends to be on like how can I get the most traffic toour site? Not always how can I help our audience be the most successful. So Ithink that's a really big part too. It's something we've always embraced.You know, a couple of things that we've done that I think really helped withall of that. One of my favorite programs that we run every year, we'vebeen doing it for five or six years now is our Video and Business Awardsprogram. So we host an annual awards program where we open it up to ourwhole community, not just our customers to submit their best stories andexamples of how they're using video to be more successful in their marketing,in their sales or their internal communications. And we get hundreds andhundreds of submissions and across again, not just our customers, butanybody out there who happens to be following us. And the reason we do thisis both to celebrate the awesomeness of what they're doing. But we also get togather all these innate best practices and all these examples from others ofwhat's working for them. And so it's not about developing a case study forall of these, it's about genuinely sourcing best practices and thenputting those people on stage, giving them a chance to share their story. Andso there's all these kinds of things that we do to really get behind thattrue thought leadership. And then of course, you've got to make sure peoplecan see it and find it and watch it for videos. That's a whole otherconversation on distribution and promotion of that content. But that'sreally what it's been fundamental for us here at Vidyard, any crazy stories or examples from someof those submissions for the award of people that have really stood out overthe years. Oh yeah, there's so much good stuff. It's I just I love runningit. I actually I judge it. So I'm part of the judging committee. We also havea cast of about usually 10 different...

...third party judges who participate init, but I've always stayed on as a judge and I it may be hard to believe,but I promise you, I actually look at every single submission that comes in,I block off like two days in my calendar to go through every submission,which a lot of people will say is that the best use of your time as a VP ofmarketing. And I will say yes, it is because I learned so much from those interms of what other people are doing many of those. I send over to our ownteam and I'm like, check out what this company did. We should do this too.It's so great. But a few of the things on the, I'll start with the marketingside and then I'll talk about the sales side on the marketing side. In the lastcouple of years, we've seen this rise of series based video content by BdBbrands who are using it as a part of their thought leadership and contentstrategy, almost like video podcasts, but people that are taking away morecreative approach to it and they're creating these branded series wherethey're launching new episodes every week or every two weeks and they'redoing them almost like in a Youtuber style mentality. They're putting in theeffort to create really interesting content, shorter form series basedcontent. And in the way that they're using those in terms of how theypromote them, how they leverage them is just absolutely awesome. And that wasactually one of the things that inspired me. I'm working on a couple ofnew original series here at Vidyard. As you see these things happen and yourecognize like, yeah, that's how people really want to interact these days,right? Like that when you say like, oh, check out our episode six of our seriesX. It just feels and sounds more interesting and if you take a smarterproduction approach, you can really do it well. So that's one thing that stoodout to me last year from, from the marketing side. On the sales side,there's lots of great examples of people with just like huge our ally.But the ones that stand out are the ones that just get super creative withvideo. Two years ago, one of the winners in the sales category wasFrankie Weschler from a company called dynamic Signal where he submitted avideo where he was prospecting into the Buffalo Wild Wings company. So theactual restaurant chain. So he had been prospecting them, sending the usualemails and phone calls. So then he decided to make a video. But heactually went down to his local Buffalo Wild Wings and he bought a pack oftheir hottest wings called their Blazin Wings and he brought them back to theoffice, sat in front of his webcam and he held it up in the camera, it's therecord button and he says, hey, friends at Buffalo Wild Wing, I am so committedto working with you. I haven't heard from you, I've been reaching out, butI'm gonna pitch my value proposition while eating your hottest blazin wings.He takes it out and he starts eating one of the wings and he literallystarts coughing and welling up and crying because it's so spicy. But hestarts delivering his pitch and he like he's coughing as he gets, but he getsthrough his whole pitch in about a minute and a half and he finishes thevideo and it's just the funniest thing when you're watching it, you can't helpbut laugh and lean in and appreciate the effort he's putting in. And he gotlike more than like 200 views on that one video in that account because itkind of went viral within the account. Right? Everybody was like, this isamazing, check this out. Did he booked the meeting? Of course, he did write,you booked the meeting in like two days where they're like, ok, great. Let'shave a chat. So there's all sorts of creative examples like that. We can'tall eat hot wings on camera. But some people have gotten really creative withit in the sales process to really connect with people in different waysand stand out from all the other noise. That's awesome. That's hilarious. Iactually feel like I've heard about that story. It's kind of like alegendary sales story, just like in the ether. I don't know the guy's name it,but it's just that's hilarious. I'd love to, to uh, to switch to get alittle tactical on video. So there's a few scenarios that, from myunderstanding that video is the most prevalent in like a sales or marketingworld. And you know, the first one that comes to mind and this is one that yousee people talk about all the time is via prospecting. If you're an SDR, ifyou're an e similar to the Buffalo Wild Wings story where maybe instead ofsending a long form email, you make a 30 to 45 2nd video about introducingyourself, your quick value prop...

...specific to that company. And thenthat's it. So I'd love to just hear you talk for a second about that. Liketactically. What's the best way to create that type of a video? Are youwriting an email with it? Like how do you get people to actually look at thatvideo and then we can move on to some other scenarios? Yeah, so prospectingis definitely a hot area for using video right now and it's largelybecause people are, I mean, just response rates and engagement rates inthe traditional tactics of text based emails and social outreach and phonecalls just keeps dwindling and um, you know, it's depressingly low becausepeople are just bombarded with that stuff. And so part of the reason thatvideo is working really well is number one, just by nature that it stands out,all the other types of communications people are getting today. Most of yourprospects will be getting no videos from sellers today. I promise you thatas much as we talk about it here, your prospects aren't getting any fromanybody else. So now there is a chance for it to stand out and be a little bitdifferent. But when you send over an email with a video to be clear on theprocess for that, so you'll be using a tool like a Vidyard, it's free. You cansign up and as soon as you know you got ready, you just hit the record button,you can record either your webcam or a screen share along with your camera onAnd record your 30-92nd video, whatever it happens to be. And once you're doneyou can drop in the thumbnail image for that video into the email and it'shyperlinks so when they click it, it launches a dedicated page and thatvideo plays back to them. And so there's a lot of merit in thinkingabout for prospecting. How am I going to get this person's attention and howam I going to get them to click play right. Like that's the most importantthing. And so there's there's three things that you want to do to maximizethat conversion rate. First of all is if you are sending it over via email,be mindful about your subject line, like any email you send. But sending avideo gives you a chance to do something a little bit different. Thatstands out Elizabeth more creative. So I've heard from a lot of differentsellers, a lot of those award winners, that subject lines that say things likemade you this video or video for you or your name plus my company video for you.So by just teasing out the fact in the subject line that you made them a videogarners higher open rates on it because it creates this level of curiosity,right? Both just the fact like wow, this person made me a video. Did theyreally like I should probably should check this out, but also theexpectation of value because again, if it's true and this person took the timeto make me a video, most people still think that's a herculean effort. Likethat's a huge level of investment for somebody way more than somebody justcopying and pasting tax. So the expectation of values immediatelyhigher. So they open your email and then you do introduce it with a littlebit of text of course, to make sure there's a little bit of context setting.We recommend usually like two sentences to help introduce the video, but yourgoal here is to get them to watch the video. Your goal in your copy isn't toget your whole value prop out or to whatever it is, the goal in the copy isget them to hit the play button because if they hit play, they're gonna see you,they're gonna hear you, they're going to meet you and that is more powerfulfrankly than anything they can read in the email. So get them to watch thevideo, right? Have some fun creative text to draw them in, say things like Imade you this 46 2nd video to quickly introduce myself and show you somethingthat I think could be a very of interest, right? Like do little tacticslike that to make it intriguing and then your final pieces, that thumbnailimage, because that's going to be the make or break on whether they decide toclick. And the most important thing there for prospecting is to try to make,have something in that thumbnail image that is personalized to them. So whenthey see it, they know in an instant that you really did make this videojust for them. And that's why we see some sellers, they'll have a whiteboard where they'll write the person's name on it or some custom message to itand hold it up in the video so that when they hit the record button, thatscene will become the thumbnail. So...

...they're going to see that in theirinbox, it's you with a message to them on the whiteboard or they'll do ascreen share video with something about the prospect up on their screen. Itcould be their linkedin profile, it could be their website, it could be anarticle that they commented on. So that's the last sort of most importantthing when prospecting because if they see it and they know without a doubtthat you really did make this just for them, they're way more likely to engagebecause their expectation of value is way higher. Now when they click, yougot to get your message out quick, it's got to be a great message. But thoseare the most important things when it comes to prospecting to get thatengagement rate up from the beginning. I love it. Okay, going on to, we've gotfour scenarios. This is the second, the second one being, you're working todeal with someone. Maybe this is a Demo or proposal follow up where thestandard playbook is, send a 13 paragraph email that, you know, peopleread the first two sentences and then maybe the last two sentences and theyskim over the rest and this is maybe either an addition to or replacement ofthat really long and sometimes kind of inflated email. Yeah, well it's, it's,it's interesting because if you, if you think about your typical sales process,there tend to be all these micro moments, you know, in between themeetings and such where yeah, you're either answering a question, you'rerecapping a demo meeting. You have, you're walking them through somethingto clearly explain it. You're addressing a competitive question,whatever it happens to be. And um, you know, traditionally we often, some ofthose things were like, oh well, lets book a meeting and we'll talk about itthen. And that's just, just, just really, it's not the best experiencefor anybody these days. So there's all these micro moments where you're goingto be sending over this information. But to your point, often we just typeit as an email and send it. And my belief is whether it's a short message,just like saying, hey, can't wait for a meeting tomorrow, like a pre meeting,check in a longer message. That's maybe a post meeting recap where you'resummarizing some of the key takeaways or maybe even a longer message whereyou're trying to explain how your product works. All of those are momentswhere you can record and send over a video. Could be short, could be long,depending on what you're explaining. But in those cases, in addition tobeing able to deliver your message more clearly because you can actually liketalk like a human, you can use intonation, you can use body language,Right? So there's all those things in terms of just more clearly explainingyour idea. But the other thing that's happening there is if they do watch you,you're increasing your amount of face time you're getting with them. You'reinherently becoming more memorable. You're inherently just building reportwith every one of these, right? Like if I were to ask you, would you rather aprospect of yours spent one minute reading one of your emails or oneminute watching you explain that idea, which would you prefer as a seller.Right. And we would all say, well, I'd rather than watch me in a video becauseall these things happen where there, you know, where they're building arelationship with me. So there's all these moments where we can say, hey,instead of sending this as an email, what if I just hit the record buttonand explain it? Or if I'm trying to walk through a product feature? What ifI did a screen share video, brought it up on the screen and actually walkthrough it for them and showed them what I'm talking about now. The lastthing that's really interesting about using these videos throughout thatsales process is that if that person forwards it around to others, potential,other stakeholders, right, who may be the people that missed the meeting,they're going to forward them the meeting recap or maybe it's somebodywho is again, not ever going to join a live zoom, but they have a stake in itand they want to see what you have to do if your champion forwards your videoaround to other people, what's happening now? Well, each of thosepeople that watches that video actually get a chance to meet you. Now, you'resuddenly a real person to them as well, not just the sales rep or an emailaddress. And I call that walking the digital halls of your accounts, becausein the old world, we all talk about like make more friends and walk thehalls and we try to do that in the physical world, where would actuallyshow up at the office, we'd smile and...

...high five and take people out forcoffee. We can't really do that and people don't really want you to do itanymore. Even once we're back to normal. And so these videos become these waysto quote unquote, walk the digital halls because you're going to get moreand more people to see you too here you to meet you. Even if you never meetthem, if they can watch you, that's a win for you when it comes to decisiontime. So I get really fired up about those ideas and when it becomes easy aspart of your process to record and send these videos, that's when the magichappens, because you don't hesitate. I love that quote, like walking thedigital halls because that is when a lot of great sales moments happen isyou're just kind of walking through the customer prospect and you see thatperson, you knew them from linkedin and you drop something at their desk or youstop by and I love the concept of being able to do that through video throughemail. Okay. The third scenario is for your bread and butter of of themarketers out there that have, whether you're going to prospects or customers,you got all these people on your email list and send your weekly, you know,email about, hey, here's an update from us or its can sometimes not always, butcan sometimes be, you know, fall on deaf ears or be a little bit lame. AndI, I imagine videos a way to kind of spice it up again, engage people on ahuman to human connection. So how would you do that or how do you do that foryou as a marketer? Yeah. I mean we've seen marketers using videos withintheir email marketing, their nurtures, their follow ups to inbound leads moreand more frequently over the years. It still doesn't seem to be commonpractice. But for a lot of people, they've been starting to do it again as,as a richer call to action for people when they're opening up that email, ifthey see a thumbnail image and something that says, Hey, watch this62nd recap, as opposed to like download this, you know, full research report.Things like that can work really well for people. So I see most marketers nowmixing it up and and offering different types of calls action, including videos.But one of the big things that I've seen happen over the course of the lastcouple of years is a lot of those videos are now back to our conversationearlier created in a way that they're featuring real people from your team.They're just, they're more authentic, They're simpler in production style andthey're almost intentionally kind of low fi because they feel more real. Soinstead of sending out a video that's this like overly produced drone footage,theme music, you know, we've got this great new thing. You've got to check itout if instead it's actually like somebody from your real business juston camera authentically saying, oh my gosh, you, I think you're gonna lovethis. I'm actually the person who wrote this awesome article. I would reallylove for you to check it out and hear your feedback. Right? So, so makingthose kinds of content even a little bit more authentic. And in some cases,I've even seen people, we've done this ourselves where they will involve theirsales reps in some of those videos because those might also be ones thatare being automatically sent out when a new lead comes in or somebody requeststhe demo or something like that and they'll actually include the actualreps in those. So if somebody comes inbound, they fill out a certain formand they get an auto responder there, including a short video with one oftheir sales reps saying, hey, this is, you know, I'm Tyler, I'm part of theaccounting here at Vidyard and my job is to help you navigate what you'redoing with video and to see if there's a way that we can help myself orsomebody from our team are going to follow up with you a little bit laterto see if there's something blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. So those sort of justmore authentic moments where we're creating almost like a conversationwith our customers through these micro videos. And I think that has a lot ofpower in today's marketing and sales and I think it really stands out fromwhat most other people are doing. I love it. I love that move of takingthat first customer interaction and getting them not only a sneak glimpseat your product because you are Vidyard but also having that human connection.Versus it just being you know, you download the form and then you say, youknow, you get a canned email from a company. It's just a great way todifferentiate yourselves in that first moment. The last scenario here is forall of the, you know, the folks that are influencers out, their theirsalespeople, marketers, ceos, whatever...

...they are that you are on linkedin,creating content, trying to build a brand or build a following. How haveyou seen video? Maybe break through the noise more or in a different way thanpeople that make, you know, just long linked in paragraphs, for example. Yeah.Well, I think we all know we've seen over the last couple of years thatlinked in and basically all the social platforms have been prioritizing nativevideo as a content format that they try to share and and drive engagement withacross the platform. And I know personally whether or not I work at BigYard, I see whenever I do a post that is just text or has external links, I'mgetting very low engagement. But as soon as I add a short video, it seemslike the sharing goes through the roof. And that's just the linked inalgorithms pushing it to more people. Because linkedin watch people to spendmore time on the site and they and facebook and others have found a postthat includes a video keeps people's attention longer, Right? Even if it'sjust for 5-10 seconds where they pause, they start to watch, they see what'shappening and they move on or they actually click play and keep engaged.So, anyways, there's a there's a motivation factor there, just from thepure standpoint of you're likely to get more engagement and your post in frontof more people, if you include a video in the post, So that's just a startingpoint. And so sometimes it is, I mean, there's even little hacks to that, like,I'll just have a written post and then I'll just record, like, a 22nd videowhere I'll be like, just explaining the topic a little bit more and then askingmy community for feedback in the comments, and just by the nature ofadding in that video, again, I tend to see a bump in engagement on it, whichis great, but that said, there's other things that you can think about doing,and one of the big things of course, with with social in general asconsistency in the publishing of your content and being disciplined aboutmaking sure it's, you know, every 2 to 3 times a week that you are posting,that you're sharing and again, including videos and as many of thosepost as possible, can really help. And one of the great ways to almost forceyourself to be consistent in this content is back to my earlier idea ofof almost thinking about it as like a series and saying, you know, like oncea week, whether or not you give it a brand right? Like you could I could dosomething called Tyler's Takes Right, Like every friday I put out Tyler'stake on something, but you don't have to do that, right. It could just be,you know, it can just be your own sort of cadence of things, but beingdisciplined in that and saying like every thursday or every Tuesday I'mgoing to create a video talking about a key topic, reviewing something that Isaw out there, but it doesn't always have to be a fresh new ideas. Sometimesit can be your perspective on an amazing article that you saw or somecool new research that was put out there. So I think there's lots oflittle ways to to do those things. And again, I think when you're, when you'remaking these videos, like any video, whether you're making it in sales orfrankly in marketing these days as well, I'll give you one more treatable quotehere for you and that be mindful, It's about connection, not perfection. Sodon't worry about the stumbles, you know, don't worry if there's a dogbarking, lean into the connection aspect of this and just be yourself, beauthentic as best you can and try to connect with people and if that's yourmindset going into it, I think you're gonna create way better content that'sgonna get way more engagement. I'm a one take guy on video, Tyler, whateverhappens if I'm stumbling, if I'm bumbling, we just roll with the punches,there's lights too short for a second take. Yeah, I always call myself a onetake wonder, but it's usually the fifth take is my one take. But anyway, we'llgo from there. My last piece for you here. Obviously we're talking onrevenue Collective podcast, you folks at Vidyard have been partners withRevenue Collective And so I'm just curious, you know, the whole thing hereis like we've got a community of, you know, revenue and operations folks thatare all kind of helping each other out on their career paths. I'm just curiouswhat is a great networking or your number one networking tipprofessionally that that has helped you...

...in your career? That's a great question. First of all,I love the revenue collected and Vidyard has done some things with thembecause I actually became a part of it personally prior to that and at aterrific experience in the network and to your point it's such an activelyengaged community way more than others. I'm a part of, frankly so kudos to theteam for that and the quality of people in there and the quality of feedbackthat I get his own standing. I think the most important thing in terms ofthe community building aspect is that you need to give more than you take andI think we all sort of know that from just being humans and you know how webe successful in our world, but I think it really is, you know, important. Iknow a lot of people when they're part of communities, they only interact whenthey're looking for something when they have a question to ask or you know,information they're searching for, but you never see them helping anybody elseanswering questions or participating in other conversations. And I think that'sthe most important thing linked in and other networks are the same as well.Right? If you can be out there and try to spend a little bit of time giving,helping to answer other questions, providing value back to the community,that's actually the best way to in return, get the value back. Becausethose people are going to connect with you, they're going to involve you inmore and more conversations. And those are the things that end up helping yoube more successful in your career. So give more than you take. I love it.Last piece. Anything, any sort of documents that have helped or resourcesthat have really helped you in your career, whether that's books, podcasts,people you follow on Youtube, Tiktok, whatever it might be, anything that has,has helped you or that you recommend other people read or check out. Itcould be any topic. Yeah. You know, it's funny the, I havefound over the last few years that the community of folks that I've built andfollow frankly, particularly on linkedin, continues to be my bestsource of inspiration, ideas and content. You know, I follow other mediasites and like on the marketing side I'm a frequent, you know, engage er inthings like demand gen report and you know, I love what marketing processdoes from a content marketing perspective. And there's, there's greatsites out there with so many terrific resources on the sales side. There'sthe usual suspects of the sales hackers and others where there's justphenomenal content and I'll certainly pop into those. But I find I spend moreand more time because just engaging with things that are being sharedproactively on the sales side. It's it's people like josh brown and johnBarrows and morgan ingram and sam Jacobs and many others were justfollowing the right people. So many of those people are seem to be so generouswith their time and the things that they're sharing. Sometimes I find itpretty remarkable. I'm like how do you spend time doing a real job with theamount of awesome stuff you're sharing for free out here? So I would I wouldreally interest encourage people. I know you're all doing it if you'relistening, you're already doing a lot of those things. But yeah, really bedisciplined and like curating those communities of marketing leaders, salesleaders, experts, authors and be disciplined in following them online.And uh, I also think that's the best way just to stay like up to datebecause there's like every day, there's so many crickets that you can get outthere. I love it. That's great. Great resources. Tylerappreciate your time this morning. This is a blast. What's the best place forfolks to find out more about Vidyard? More about you if they want to connectwith you. Yeah, so the easy one for sure is please connect with me onlinkedin. Tyler, Lassard, VP Marketing. Vidyard, you'll find me there.Certainly Vidyard dot com is where you can go for a tremendous amount ofresources on using video, across marketing and sales, video production,video prospecting. We have a plethora of resources on all of those things inour learning center and on our blog. So take a look there. And if you areinterested in the sales side of the world of if you're not yet using a toollike Vidyard to record and send videos to your prospects or customers, it'sfree. So just like go to Vidyard dot com, hit the sign up for free button,it's unlimited usage. Just give it a shot. And even if you don't use itexternally, you can use it internally...

...to share videos with teammates, friendsand family. I wish your father, happy father's day coming up, whatever ithappens to me, it's a really simple tool, so I encourage you to check thatout and let me know what you think on linkedin. That's awesome. And speakingof people like morgan ingram creating content, he had shared a while ago.Like if you're getting started with video, just send five a day, You know,five a day Start small, it's not gonna be overwhelming. Takes you threeminutes to come up with each 13 times five is 15 minutes and everyone's got15 minutes a day if you're a sales person to try something new and and seeit. So I appreciate it. Video is a game changer. I appreciate your time andyour knowledge here. Tyler wonderful. Well, thank you. My pleasure. All right,Thanks for checking out that episode. This is tom Alamo. Feel free to add meon linkedin and connect after the show. Let's give one more shout out to oursponsor. This episode was brought to you by drift. The new way businesses byfrom businesses. You can learn more and get the conversation started at driftdot com. Great people over there. Tell us our great guy. I love thisconversation until next week. Get after it, Have a good time. We'll see younext monday piece. Say something Yeah.

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