The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

Ep 210: How To Build Your Sales Leadership Career w/ Garrett Marker, VP Sales Braze

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 210: How To Build Your Sales Leadership Career w/ Garrett Marker, VP Sales Braze 

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

All, everybody, welcome back to the pavilion podcast, where revenue leaders learned the tips, tricks and tactics they need to be successful in their roles. I'm your host, Tom a LEMO. Thank God it's Monday. Let's get into it. Today I've got a great interview with Garrett Marker. Garrett is the VP of sales over at Bray's, cut his teeth in the early days over at Linkedin and then we had a great conversation, not only playing a little bit of the name game for its mutual friends that we have from the former linkedin days, for are currently at Gong and elsewhere. But you know, Garrett just really got in deep as it relates to, you know, mentorship, how to succeed, as in, you know, kind of upleveling your skill set to get to the next level, a sales leadership style, and you know why they've been so successful at raised for the past two years that he's been there. So I think you're really really going to enjoy this episode. I certainly did. We're going to get to the content in a second, but just a really quick word from our sponsor and then we'll get straight into the show. All right, this month your episodes are brought to you by Dochabo, an award winning industry leader and trusted enterprise learning partner for more than two thousand of the world's best brands. Now let's get into our episode, all right. Next on the podcast here we've got Garrett Marker, coming from Beautiful Oakland, Allifornia. Garrett, how are you man? I'm doing well. How herself? I'm doing well. I'm doing well. I'm excited to have you on the call. We just kind of rift a little bit about making sure each of our talk ratios in line with going is as close to fifty or below fifty as possible. So I'm hoping to be twenty five to thirty and your you know, was at seventy to seventy five. That's my goal for this one. There you go. Well, one of us will make it successful. Soul, see go, man. Well, I'm excited to have you on. Obviously you're leading the sales efforts at Bray's been there for about two years now. I'd love to before we get into what you're doing currently, love to take it back. I'm always fastinated with hearing people's kind of genesis into sales. I know you started at net APP it look like, and then went into linkedin. So maybe we could just talk about sales in general, like how did you get into the sales world? If that was an influence from your family or a guidance counselor in college or some some other realm. I'm just curious how you got in here. Yeah, it was definitely a family had something to do with that. So I think I was the typical precocious college student who had ambitions to do big things but doesn't have the skill setter, the patients to go get there yet. But I was really fortunate to have parents of both worked in tact can had very, very senior level roles at companies, and so I got to learn a lot about what they did and it was something that was really inspirational to me because it seemed like you got the opportunity to not just have a big impact on kind of the customers that you would serve, but the people that you would work with at those companies, maybe helping them with their career and kind of helping be a part of their larger crew journey. And so I wanted to do that longer term, I thought, but obviously, again being a precocious twenty year old or whatever it was of the time, was not qualified and was nowhere close to getting there, and so I was lucky that they introduced me to a bunch of different exacts at different tech companies in different fields to try to figure out what was the function that I might like, and sales was the one that I really gravitated towards. I got to go meet the how of sales at qual calm at the time and they talked a lot about earlier their career. There were dash boards and to me as a competitive person, that was very exciting. I knew how I would rank and I would be able to tell if I was doing well or not. But further on, what I really liked is that it seemed like the best sales eaters were really trying to focus on how do you make other people successful, the people in the your or the customers that you work with, the cross functional partners that all work with you to go help that company and your customers be successful, and so for me it kind of became like the obvious thing to do. That kind of aligned with my own kind of competitive and numbers oriented mindset, but also some of the long term things I wanted to do, which was really just do something where I could have an impact on...

...other people while doing my jump. So, yeah, walk me through you you said, I think you mentioned competitiveness as part of that. was that something that has always been in you, like from a sports days, from you know, as a kid, from trying to have the best grades, from a being a musician, anything like that? Definitely right. So I played a lot of sports growing up. Didn't play in college, so clearly wasn't that good, but always played a lot of sports growing up. My mom likes to refer prints. How you know, there's times when my younger brother I'd go make him play sports. Smoothie. We was like to and I was very competitive, even though I was obviously going to go whin all the time, and she had been Christy to maybe not rub it in so much. But yeah, I've kind of always been that way. Right, whether it's sports, whether it's school, whether it's anything else. For me, anything where there's a clear winner or a way that you can go kind of demonstrate that you've achieved whatever the goal is has always been something that I've been really drawn towards. Yeah, so I want to point out a few different parts of your career journey that I see. That I see his pivotal points. And so the first one is obviously linkedin. You were there for five years, from like what eleven or two thousand and eleven or twelve to sixteen or seventeen, starting as an SDR, getting to think like global sales account ae ar or am so a lot of promotions within that five years. Talk to me about like where was Linkedin then? Was that pre acquisition of Microsoft? Like were you relatively small in two thousand and eleven? Like what was that first kind of sales roll like? And then just what was the journey like for five years? They're just so such an amazing sales culture and company culture. Yeah, so I joined. Yeah, so right after that, Ipoh suding, we I paard like six to twelve months before we joined. I was very fortunate to have a gentleman by the name of David Kats So, I now think runs mid market sales at hub spot, gave me a chance to go do that role not having a ton of sales experience of that time. So we'll ever feel grateful for that. And Yeah, we went from about a thousand or so employees then to the by the time I left, I think probably around tenzero or so. We got acquired by Microsoft maybe a year ish before I left, and we went from just really having one vertical, which was the HR tech recruiting solutions, to rolling out marking solutions and sale solutions and kind of some of the different verticals they have now. So it's definitely quite a journey from a scaling perspective, one that I think at the time I didn't really understand how lucky I was to get to go do those things. But definitely in Hindsight I'm super appreciative being a part of that organization. And Yeah, on the growth side, I was really fortunate to not just kind of get the job there but continue to get opportunities. You know, I had a couple of good years early on where I broke a bunch of records at Linkedin for sales, but increasingly had people take chances on me right, because every job was one I hadn't done before. Right. So it's like when interviewed for enterprise roles, it's you know, have you done six seven figure deals, worked with complex sale cycles, even traveled to done on sites and hadn't done any of those things right. So someone had to go take a chance and eventually it's moving in the roles where you're managing the relationships with the Microsoft or qual calm or Ebay or google or these large multinational companies that are spending twenty, thirty, forty, fifty the million dollars a year with your company. And obviously I've never done that before, but was continually fortunate to have people take a chance on me and give me the opportunity to go prove myself. So I will always be really grateful, not just for David for hiring me, but for every single hire manager. They gave me an opportunity to go try something new that I hadn't done before. Really thankful that I got those opportunities and was was collad that I was able to do okay with them. I May, I've talked to a lot of people that seem to be legends at Linkedin both there's a lot of Gong. There's a lot that I've met at at other great companies that have gone on to do amazing things and be Croros and CEO. So I'm curious, like, from your standpoint, what were some of the takeaways you had of like this, either the sales or the company culture of like whether it was around coaching or how they trained you up or whatever it is, it just seems like there's such a huge amount of successful sales people that have come...

...from linkedin in particular. Yeah, so I think one big thing that linkedin did have a really strong culture, right, and I think one of the core outputs of that was really encouraging people and hiring for people that had a growth mindset, right, so looking for people that kind of had to belief that if they worked hard and kind of learned and listened and sought out advice from others, that they could be better than they were the day that they walked through the door. There's many great amadotes that I'm sure other linkedin people have shared on the podcast, of which kind of were shared with individual team members, but I think that was kind of one really big element, and so for me it was I got to work with really smart people who are willing to go share or what made them successful. I asked them a lot of questions was able just to learn a ton through that experience. So I think that was kind of one big element, that kind of growth mindset that you know they tracted people there and really encourage people to have but I definitely think there was mentorship as well. So Brian Frank who out that. I think he's a CEO of cameo now but at the time was the global head of revops are sales ups for Linkedin. He had, I guess, like a mentorship program where he'd pick one or two people a year he would just go meet with pretty regularly and kind of work with them and do different things, and I was fortunate enough to get selected for that for whatever reason, and I got to like fly out and spend time with him in New York right and like sit in his global staff meetings and meetings, and I feel like I probably shouldn't even have been there for right, and I was, you know, on of like twenty three, twenty four, and the never even like got on a plane for work, let alone been and these kind of means and just the exposure that I got, and then kind of the coaching and mentoring. It starts with people like that one in investing people like me who they could have been doing many other things in their time, but then also, ultimately, the advice and feedback that they gave. I find myself and not now, whether it's with individual reps or individual sales managers I work with or whatever it may be, giving them the same advice that was given to me several years ago, having them think it's such great advice and realizing it all came back to kind of folks like that being willing to mentor people like me. So I think that you to your point around kind of mentorship with it. That was a really big thing. I guess Reid Hoffman kind of started the company, was probably the mentor for many people on down, but I think that culture leadership was a big difference. Man. That's amazing. So that was when you were twenty, three or twelve. You were only a year or two into the company right at that point, and you just you happen to get chosen because you he saw something in you. or it wasn't like a raffle right, it was like no and Pike. To be honest, I'd have to ask him why he was willing to go special. I wanted to be honest, but I've been performing pretty well as a rep and a then greatly exceeding targets, and so I think I got to be fortunate to be on people's radars because of that and it just sort of, I think, was they tried to go find some people. I think another big components I'd come from the Dr Program and one thing at Linkedin they always talked about was this concept of St for L so SD for life, kind of making sure that they have that big kind of culture around that and that when people went wherever they want, that still they remembered where they came from. And I think when I moved into a global accounts I was probably the first, if not only at that time, person who never made it from the BEDR str function to those roles. So I think you know, given that, I think that's d our function. Sat with them sales ups. I'm sure there were some hey, here's a person who came essentially from the bottom has done pretty well. Right, I also want to go highlight their success, which obviously he didn't need to do, but I was very appreciative of at the time and even more so now. Man. So the other thing that you mentioned on the growth mindset, I imagine me, Hey, look, we talked to of any VP of sales and you ask a do you want someone with the growth mindset? I couldn't imagine anyone's going to say no. I feel like the hard part is probably trying to vet that out when you're trying to recruit, when you're trying to hire folks. I'm curious, like, do you have is that something that you look for it bras, and if so, how do you? How do you find that out about someone without just asking them point blank? You know you have a growth mindset. Are Tell me about what your mind sets like? Yeah, no, this is a great question and it gets into one of the topics I'm super passionate about, which is interviewing right and how you think about doing that a different level, cell I'm going to name check some other people...

...who I think gave me a lot of good advice something. So one thing I actually learned from Kelly, who knows the president over a gone. This is concept of like an ideal ideal seller profile right of you know you need to before you start interviewing reps, and this goes from managers and other roles as well, have a documented understanding of what are the attributes that all the people who have been successful here have? Have Alignment on those and make sure that those are the things that you're actively screening for in the interview process, not other things. It's very easy they get caught up with, oh, we're from the same area, we like the same sports team. I just like the energy of the conversation. That doesn't really mean that you're going to have a growth mindset will alone be a successful rep at that company. It just means that maybe you got along well, and so being very intentional, I think, is the first piece. And then I think the second thing is running a structured interview process where you're making sure you're trying to get evidence based examples of those things. So, for instance, if you're trying to figure out if someone's curious or not, because you believe curious people do well in sales because they do good discovery, a great way to get signal on that is ask them during some part of the interview process, what questions do you have for me, and seeing what are the questions they have. I've had interviews where people ask me questions for hours. I've had interviews where, when you give them the floor, they have no questions. Right. That's a way to demonstrate that you're curious or not, is whether or not you actually have questions and we're curious about the role the company, the things you might be doing. I think it's a same an example with a growth mindset, right. A growth mindset is someone who who believes they can necessentially do more and be more than they are and have taken the time to go learn and prove to go get there. Right. So if you ask people questions around, what was the time that you ran into challenges and how are you able to go work through that? Right, the example that they give will help demonstrate whether or not they have a growth mindset. So it could be, Hey, I'm a rep that move from S and B to enterprise. Right, the things I was doing in those transnational velocity cycles weren't working anymore. Right. I wasn't able to get enough meetings, right, I wasn't able to go multi thread whatever it was, and so what I did was I sat down with two of my peers, interviewed them, ask them what they were doing, learned a couple new tactics, started planning that into what I was doing and then ultimately was a little bit more successful. Right. That is a specific example of someone demonstrating that they have a growth mindset, and so I find that combination of knowing it's what you're looking for and having a structured interview process where you're asking certain questions to see have they demonstrated behaviors that show they've done that in the past, are the best way to go screen for that, and I found that sense. Implementing processes like that, not only have I've been able to go hire more people more quickly, but ultimately they meant a lot more successful, which is great for the candidate but also great for the company as well. Do you think the ideal sales profile or salesperson profile should vary a lot by company, I mean, or do you think in general there's key characteristics that every vp of sales like, if you're going to go join three five different companies the rest of your career, that you're always going to look for certain characteristics? I think it's a little bit of Bou Right. So like curiosity is one that I think is super valuable. Probably wherever you are and a sales up right, discovery is going to be a key portion of what you're doing, no matter if it's a small preproduct market fit series a company, or if you're a brace or if you're a linkedin or Microsoft. Now and even larger. So I do think there's some things that overlap, but there's absolutely traits that I think are different depending on the companies that you're at. So I found I've been fortunate to lead the go to market teams of like series a, three C's companies, in addition to kind of obviously being at larger companies like Brays, and I find when you're that early, right, some traits that are important are very different. So examples of things I think are really important for earlier stages tend to be stuff like mission alignment, right, because it's like you're not going to get paid the same amount, you don't have the same brand name recognition. Right, you don't have all these things. You might have a bigger company, so people might need to be really passionate about the problem you're solving to be able to do well there and be successful right. Or at earlier company, maybe what's really important is trying to find product market fit. So you need to actually be someone who likes to test and iterate and you'r have...

...a very scientific method, solution oriented type mentality. That, at a small company I think is super, super important, because you walk in, you try a pitch, it doesn't work for several calls, you need to ditch it and do a new one, whereas when you go to a bigger company, if that's happening, that company has a whole bunch of different problems right because ideally that should have already been figured out. So I absolutely think there are different traits that people need to be to have to be successful at different stages. They're a hundred percent overlapping ones as well, and I think that's candidly why, when you got people who some can be at all different stages of a company and do really well and some are only successful in certain stages, I think that's some of the reason why. Because there are some baseline skills they're going to be relevant regardless of stage, but there's absolutely some they're very stage specific and your ability to have those naturally learn them is going to be a big determination factor as to whether you're successful or not. HMM. So I'm imagining that you have, you know, your ideal sales profile. Let's say it brays and I'm not going to ask you for secret sauce, so don't worry. Well, let's say you have you know, ten characteristics and you know some of them are things like curiosity or growth mindset and some of them are are specific to your product or your industry or, you know, being a series, you know eight or C company. When you're doing an interview process, do you have that like mapped out in a Google Sheet and then you interview me and then you say, all right, Tom Tom was a, you know, a b plus on growth mindset. He was an a and curiosity, but he was a see on you know, knowing the you know, the market or the product or whatever it might be. Is that how you're going about it, or is it maybe a little bit more like art than that level of like science to it? Yeah, there's definitely some art too, but it is actually more akin to what you articulated right to a certain degree. You know, you ask a lot of questions. You're probably curious, you ask no questions, you're probably not. You ask a few. Your somewhere in between right. So there is some art to you know. How how much of a signal do I think that this individual action gave me? But it is very much here's the several things. They demonstrate that they have those things during the process us or they don't, and if they do, great, we want to go move forward with that person and that they don't write, we're going to determine that we don't think it's going to be a great fit, and that's helpful because I think it also makes things a little bit more objective. I found that sense implementing processes like that, that we've actually started hiring a lot more diverse candidates than we did before, because I think when you are focused on things like how long have you been in Martek or how many years have you been in sales, of course you're going to go hire the people that have traditionally been in those roles, but you could have done anything for your career and be curious. Right. You can do anything for your career and have a growth mindset. You can do anything for your career and have self awareness. And so when you start screening for those things and getting signal there, what you start finding, as you spread the pool out to other people, that you know maybe they weren't in MARTEC and SASS sales, but they were in, say, I mean one of the best hires that do you know? I I've worked with right was like didn't have any software experience with basically selling copiers right and then like came into did awesome right, but they had all those underlying traits and knowing that they had those gave us confidence that our enablement team could help them learn the space. And so I they're definitely is the science there, and I find that actually is what helps root out bias and you end up hiring more diverse teams as a result of that. What's a mistake that you generally see, like if you come into a new company or you hire new managers or whatever it might be that I know interviewing it sounds like it is a passion of yours. Sounds like you've got a pretty doubt in but we've talked about like lack of diversity. We've talked about creating the ideal sales profile, you know, not just going with someone that you like your you want to you know, grab a beer with or whatever, but any other like major mistakes you think that that sales leaders tend to make in the hiring process that stand out? Yeah, I think a big one is a focus too much on this concept of selling the candidates versus just being honest and transparent around the problems that they have, which actually is going to go be refreshing and sell people more often. Right, if we're interviewing, and I'm telling you as a sales wrap, hey, every single person's hand a hundred fifty percent of their number. There's a you're drowning and inbound leads. You don't have...

...to do any prospecting and you know everybody's going promote it every six months when you get here. If that's not the case, you were going to be able to tell that right away. Right. That's not something that I can go hide. But if that's the reason why you joined and that's not the case here, you're either gone out the door in three to six months and are going to go work somewhere else, especially in this market, or you're immediately less engaged than you would have been. Right. You already feel like people were dishonest with you and you weren't putting as much time in, whereas if you're a little bit more honest about the problem, some people will go oh, that problem actually doesn't sound that hard to solve and it sounds like if I solve that, I'm going to be the top performer. So I actually want to go work at that company. And also, I've been on like four interviews this week and they're all telling me how great it is. This is the only person who feels like they've been honest and real. I want to go work with that person. I can't tell you how many times, you know, I've told someone problems that we have as a business and someone said, well, that's why I'm joining the company where. I fundamentally believe that just being honest and transparent. And there's also a good things, like with rays, we want public right the businesses on. Well, so there's plenty of great things to go talk about, but by being real about the things maybe not so great, I find that that actually allows us to attract more candidates. Like I'm trying to think about it. I don't think I've had up this will probably happen now because I'm saying this on the PODCAST, but I don't think I've had a candidate reject an offer in like three or four years. Wow, right. But I think some of it's because we're really up front about what it is early. Some people opt out after that initial conversation because I got that doesn't sound that great, but by the time we're at the end they know exactly what they're getting into. They only spent the time with us, if that's what they want, and I just fundamentally I think that's more impactful than like citing you know, we won six best places to work awards, but so did every other tech company, right, so I don't know how much that differentiates us. Yeah, yeah, I love that. So I want to pivot because the other career, you know kind of trajectory thing that I noticed that I want to ask about was your next move after linkedin going to eightfold, where you went from you know, global a or count manager at a tenzero person company to being the first go to market higher. There's a lot of pavilion members that, whether the first go to market hire or they're in the very early days or they're considering a jump like that. It's a conversation that comes up a lot and so I'm just curious, like what was the transition like going from, you know, being in such a large pond to a small pond, so to speak, in growing the team there? Yeah, well, it was scary. I'll tell you that. I remember after like my first couple days in the office, which was literally me and nine, nine people in a room, like just like a room. I don't even think we had conference rooms. was like like nine people in a room and you know, I'm coming from Linkedin, which is like, you know, tenzero people. We have breaface, lunch and dinner. cator. There's someone who will make you coffee on like a sufting floor, roop deck with, you know, cool you know outlines of shapes in it, all this kind of stuff, right. So, like all these things and I'm literally in a room in the middle though, where and nobody knows who we are. So like couldn't be any more different. So it's absolutely scary. I think the things that I would give people advice for as far as, like, if they're going to make that move, what they should think about, as far as like what kind of company to go pick, based off the advice that I got, and then also things will just be aware of when you get there are, if you've never been at a start up before, there's a lot of value and working with people who have been out of start up but also had some level of success right got in Typeo, had an exe whatnot. That's some really good advice I got and I just was determined that when I was going to go to a startup, I was only going to go to one with experience founders and that was massively helpful. Oshoon run we're great partners to go work with, as was everybody else on the team, and they really helped cover up for gaps of just things that I didn't even know I didn't know and allowed me to kind of go do the stuff where I could go at value. So I think going with experience founders, if you're that's your first time I start up, I think it's a big, a big thing to go do. I think one going to a place that doesn't immediately need to go raise funding. Right. So I got the advice of go to some place that had, you know, raised a series a already from top tier firms, because it would give me eight to eighteen to twenty four months to figure it out and I was going to need it, I was told, because I didn't know said what I was doing, whereas if you're going somewhere where they're...

...saying, Hey, you're about to raise this next round of funding and you're going to be part of that, that also means we have three to six months to figure this out, otherwise we're going to let you go and hire someone else and so that was a big advice I give. Just give yourself a little bit more run way to figure it out and, on that last piece, go to a space that you understand. I remember when I went from HR tech to Fintech, I it was way different, right, and I had to learn a lot. Similar to go into Martech now with braves, but at least when going from HR tech to Fintech, I knew it was like to be an executive at a series a three C company right. Understood kind of how that works. So I wasn't having to learn how to learn in industry and how to do my job. It was just one or the other, and that was super helpful. When starting at e ful right, was given that it was also an HR tech I kind of knew the space, I knew the competitors, I knew a general talk track, I knew the profiles of people hire, I knew what kind of companies we might want to hire from, and it made all those elements so much easier and I think it's a big reason why we went from like zero to ten million and revenue in a couple of years, right, and how a lot of success. So I think those are things I think about when interviewing, just to make sure you're maximizing your chance of success. And then, I think when getting there, I think a couple things, especially if you've come from a larger company, are one, you know the problems you're trying to solve a different right when you're in a big company, you're trying to hit a number, get a customer to sign up, get a customer renewer grow. When you're really small, you're just trying to demonstrate the people actually will spend time and money on what you have. That's actually the only problem that matter, yers, and it's a pretty scary one, but it's a very simple one and you have a lot of flexibilit you can change the product, you can change approach, you can do a lot of things, but that is fundamentally the only problem you need to solve. I think a lot of people try to bring all these processes that they have from larger companies. I'm going to forecast, I'm going to do all these things and it just doesn't matter yet, and see you end up spending a bunch of time on things and are nice two as when you're that early, but are really important when you're a larger company with different goals. So I think that's a really big thing, right, is making sure that you understand product market fits the goal, and that's what you need to focus on, and not bringing all of your big company processes with you. I think the other two things are understanding that the executive team is your first team. When you're in sales and working with sales people, you're all rallying around a quota or a target or a spiff or whatever it is. Right when you're a member of the executive team, you're working with product right, you're working with marketing, you're working with engineering right, and you're trying to go figure out hey, you know, engineering can build this product to help me when the deal, but if they build that product they can't do these other three things that are really important, like those are now things that you have to go think through that are very different if you just spend a midlevel leader at a bigger company who hasn't had to go think about that. And then I think the third thing is I would encourage people to stay humble, and what I mean by that is you need to be really open asking others for help, right, and you need to be open to the fact that you may not be the person that's going to take that company all the way. When you're early on and you're leading that company, right, it's pretty lonely. Right, you don't have a bunch of other sales leaders or sales reps and bounce your ideas off of like it might just be you or you and your immediate team. You need to have a network of people that you can both kind of put your head on when you are having some issues, but also too, they can actually help you, give you advice from their experiences and help you figure out what you need to be doing. But also be humble in the sense of in some ways, if you do well, they're probably going to hire somebody more experience to be your boss, and your mentality should be that you should welcome the opportunity to go work with them and learn from them, because it's probably going to happen anyway, versus looking at it as a front on. I was so successful, why didn't you give me that opportunity? Right, and so I think those are the things that someone which I knew going in someone which I didn't, but are absolutely anytime I talk to friends now who are thinking about going to companies, those stages. That's kind of the advice I give them, both on like how to pick a company, but also like when you're there, here's the things you need to be aware of. Garrett, you're dialed in, man, you've got like you just got it laid out for like both the interview and on the on the job sear it's just like the questions to ask what to look for. If I was in either of those positions, whether I was looking to grow my team and hire or if I was looking at a new job up and especially going from a large to a...

...small company, I might rewind that, you know, eight minutes and it write down some of those because it was just right on the money. Awesome. I appreciate it that. Well, hopefully now no one of my current company things I'm looking for a job because I've talked so much about jobs or like that. But no, I hope it's helpful right, because I am so thankful to all the people that help me figure out what kind of startup still look at, because I've seen so many friends go to ones that just didn't work out and looking back at you know why they chose their companies on. Like man, I'm so lucky that I had people who are so much smarter than me giving me some advice so I could just make a better choice because, you know, I worked really hard, a eightful than we did good work, but I'm not going to act like they were successful because of me. You know, someone else probably could have been successful there, but since I was really smart about where I picked, it just gave me a longer runway to figure it out, which I absolutely need them. So, yeah, how did you find those people that gave you this great advice? Yeah, so I think there was a couple things. One, I was fortunate to have some of the people who were senior exacts at Linkedin be willing to mentor me and give me advice. It was really weird when I was talking to some of them about whining to work at a different company and they're giving me advice on which companies to look at. So speaking of like mentorship, growth mindset whatever, the fact that I could have those kind of conversations with people at Linkedin, I think just tells you everything you need to know about their culture. So I think that was a big thing. You know, my parents have both worked at start up so I was able to ask them a lot about their experiences, what went well, went didn't go well. So those were people that I talked to. By this point in my career I'd also had friends and colleagues that have matriculated into executive search or venture capital or I think this was what the dawn of when VC firm started having people on their talent teams and exact search teams and so as able to kind of go ask them for some advice. And so I kind of just talked to these ten, fifteen different people and all them said many different things, but like the three things they all said were pick a company that's raised a series a from a top tier firm, pick a company who have founders who taken it to an exit before, and pick a space you're familiar with. Do those three three things and go to that company and don't go to any other ones. And so then it was just I can't even tell you how many companies had to talk to before one I found a company like that, but also kns leave one that was willing to hire me right, because many wanted to hire people who've been ahead of sales or VP of sales before. I had not right. So there's a bunch of people that weren't willing to give me that chance. But you know, Ashu was. It's actually great story about when I interviewed with Ashu, but he was willing to go give me that chance, and so I'll forever be grateful for that because it's had a massive impact on my career trajectory. It's always be a pursuit of that. You can't tell me you have a great story and think that I'm not going to ask you about the story. A fair fair enough. Well, so I'll do a shortened version of it, but we were talking before the we got on the on that episode that we I'm from South Bay, right, so help ban Silken Valley. And so during the interview process, as shoe says, Hey, meet me at this address for one of the conversations and I recognize where it is because it's like right next to where I used to go play basketball growing up. So I assumed it was the coffee shop those on that corner. I was okay, cool, and to go bet ash you there. I'll be great. It's fine, going to go driver, they'll be great. And I get there and I can't find them right and I and I text him and okay, I look, I'm here. Where are you? What's going on? And he's like, I'm in the hospital. Hospitals like across the street right elk. This is Alcam you know why, MCA and stuff down there for folks that are from that, from the area in San Francisco, Marya. But it's like I'm in the hospital. So like that's a little bit weird, but whatever. I hope everything's fine, but I'll go over there. Turns out I think his wife gave birth the day before, but he's still thought it made a ton of sense to go interview me there and we're doing interviews and we're doing, I guess you want to do like a mock call or something, and there's like some robot going around cleaning and stuff that's like literally going around us and throw us and all the stuff. One of the weirdest interviews that I've ever had, and I joked with them that probably the only reason you hired me, as if I was crazy enough to show up for that interview, I was probably a crazy enough to go figure out how to go be successful in the role. But yeah, I think that's the first, first and last time I will ever interview for a job at a hospital, let alone after my future boss is wife just gave birth to their second kid, so it was a...

...it was an interesting, interesting experience, but all worked out well and there and that kid is awesome, by the way. So they're doing great. That's great. That's crazy. That's a great story. I want to hit you with a couple rapid fires before I let you go. Gars Echo with you. Yes, sounds great. All right. First thing, we're huge learners on this podcast, speaking of growth mindset. Curious. I'm not sure if you're a reader or not, but if you are, any books that have made a major impact in you, in your life or your career? Any topic is fair game. Yeah, so there's two books that come to mind. One is seven powers by Hamilton Helmer. So it's a book about kind of what are the seven things that create long term competitive advantage and business? I find it to be a really, really interesting book to start thinking about like macro trends. I think it's helpful when thinking about what company you want to go work for, but also thinking about if you're a company builder, what are some of the different things that you should be thinking about the build competitive andever time and they give some great examples of how certain companies have those things and whatnotating. It's a really, really interesting read. The other book I'M gonna have to probably go look up the exact title, but I can probably send it to offline, but it's called like the psychology of influence or the power of influence. I find some of the most interesting books to read for sales are actually ones that have nothing to do with sales but more to just do with how people think can operate. And so this book talks about everything from if you've ever been kind of pre pandemic, like out in public and people are trying to hand you stuff right people are canvassing or trying to hang you fiers whatever. It talks about like why they talk to you the way they do and how that statistically proven to make it that you're more likely to engage with them versus not. And so there's a lot of interesting things around the way you make a statement, the kind of question you ask, when you ask the question and how that makes other people more likely to engage with you. And when you're thinking about sales, you know, most people know we're doing discovery or trying to understand pain we're trying to go solution map, our solution to that pain. But just because you ask the question doesn't mean they'll give you the answer, and so I find that book to be a great one. I recommend to many reps to go read because I think it gives you're a really good human perspective on like how people think, why people do what they do, and if that informs the way that you think about asking questions, you're just going to ask better questions and be more effective. I love it. How about other learning methods? I'm not sure if you're a podcast person, blogs, newsletter, Linkedin, follow anything that stands out that you really are into nowadays. Yeah, so work related, I'm definitely a big podcast person. So shout out to the pavilion podcast. List some of that one all the time. SASTER PODCAST, go to market grit, which I think is kinder Perkins I listened to and there's several other ones. So I find those to be really great kind of bite size ways to just go learn about certain topics. So like any time I see one pop up that's about a topic that is something I'm doing at work and not figuring out quickly, my God, I should just listen to that and listen someone else smart and now they figured that one out. So I think that's a big thing I do for learning. And actually another big shout out to give on the Pavilion Front is to some of the coursework right. So I actually did CMO school and part of the reason I did that was actually because I wanted to learn better how marketers thought, both one so I could be a better partner to a CMO and our marketing team internally at breeze, but also that's the persona that we sell to at breeze, and the better I can understand what are the things that they're working through and one of the challenges are trying to solve, for the better partner I can be on, you know, executive alignment calls and things like that. So big shout out to pavilion and all of that long form course work right, because I found that to be a really impactful class. I learned a ton of things about a space I didn't know nearly as much. And what highly recommend not just a coursework that candidly taking the courses that are on things outside of your own discipline so you can understand the people that you work with around you a lot better. That's a great idea. I'm in the middle of the Frontline Manager School Nice speak, brought by Kevin Dorsey, which is absolutely amazing. So I second that. All right. What's going on in the headphones nowadays? Gary...

It spotify or Apple Music? If you're listening to music, you know whether you're getting ready for the day or whatever it might be. What's going on? Well, today I did a Palleton ride yesterday and put on by Gez and Kanye West came on and I forgot how much of a Banger that song is. So that's been in in rotation the last couple days. But lately I've been listening to a lot of Afro beats actually. So whether it's like Thames or whether it's burn a boy or like a bunch of people from Nigeria, especially right I think we're a lot of stuff from I've been listening to a lot of that kind of music recently. And then, you know, I've also been listening to a lot of like fleetwood Mac and like s rock and some other stuff to kind of go balance about. So a good mix of things. But but yeah, put on by Young Geez. I forgot how much that song. That Song Bangs, and so I've been playing a little bit lately. If anyone puts on young Geez anywhere in my sight, I will punch a hole in the wall. Gets so fired out like I it's absolute it's one of those songs. It's one of those songs like that, like Gingyang twins or some things, where it just comes on and it takes you back to whatever that time in your life was right. Like I was joking with friends recently that when get little, by yinging twins comes on, that's how you can tell how old someone is, because they're going to tell you a story about my college Frat Party, right, or at my high school dance or at, you know, my friend's wedding, like whatever they're going to say. They have a story about that song, and so you just do the math and go, okay, if that songs you know twenty years old and you know you're twenty two, you're probably forty two right, and you can kind of put two and two together. That was high school dance for me. I you just as you said it right, and it's like it's like one of the signs were just for whatever reason, it's a shared experience that everybody seems to be pretty aware of. That's hilarious. All right. One of the last questions for you. Who would you want to see come next on the pavilion podcast? Who who would like to go come see? Well, there's a lot of people that come to mind. I think a couple folks just because I connected with them recently. So just bear she's now had a demand Jen at movable ink. Actually just caught up with her ear this week. Super Funny, Super Sharp, doing some great things there. I think I was a really great perspective on demand Jen how to go work with sales and a lot of great work there. So I think she absolutely would. Someone I've learned a lot from right. I think would be a great person. Another Person Chris Far Eli. So he's the VP of sales, a dynamic field. So I think they've got acquired by a Master Card, I think is what it was, but he hads up the sales. They're super sharp, empathetic people, leader right. So I think he's someone who would be great to get on here. And I won't name more people because I think some of them I've already been on it. But those are two folks that I've connected with recently that I definitely lean on for like advice and guidance, and I've learned a lot from so I think other people could do I love it. I love it, Garrett. Thank you for spending some time today breaking everything down. I want to give you a moment before we head off to just first let people know where they can find you, if they can kick the on Linkedin or anything like that, and then where they might want to find out more about braves, whether it's to work there, whether it's to see what you folks are doing, if from a marketing standpoint or whatever might be. YEA, yeah, so I think the best place to find me is on Linkedin. Having worked there, I'm pretty responsive and pretty familiar with that. So it's just Garrett Marker on Linkedin, so I should be pretty I think there's a lot of Garrett markers. I'll be pretty easy to go find. As far as if you want to learn more about breeze, working with us, working out our company, anything to that order, feel free to reach out to me directly or just go to bracecom and sin kind of look at the job boarding, go apply to roles there, but would love to go here from folks, searches and braves, and so always willing to be reached out to directly for that Awesome Garret. Appreciate you coming on, man, this is great, awesome. Thanks already, folks. This episode was brought to you by Doch Abo. NOCHEBO is redefining the future of enterprise learning with its AI based learning suite. With Dochebo, you can create and manage engaging content, deliver training to customers, partners or employees and measure how learning impacts your people and your business, all with a single suite. Find your learning and development sweet spot at Doch abotcom. Thank you for listening to this episode. Feel free to give me...

...some feedback on Linkedin. My name is Tom Alamo. Hit subscribe and until next week, get after it, y'all. Peace.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (253)