The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

Ep 192: The Guide To Getting Hired In Sales w/ Tom Alaimo

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 192: The Guide To Getting Hired In Sales w/ Tom Alaimo 

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

All right, body, welcome back to the pavilion podcast. This is the show where revenue leaders learned the tips, tricks and tactics they need to be successful in their roles. I'm your host, Tom Alemo. They call me Tommy Tahoe. I'm pumped to be here to kick off the month of February with y'all, and I'm going to do it without anyone by my side. I'm going to go solo on today's episode. I've actually been doing a lot of content geared towards the massive shift in supply and demand for str and generally in sales talent. I tell a little bit of a story about that in this episode, as well as give some concrete advice for folks that are looking to land a sales job how I would do it if I was looking, which I'm not, but if I was, this is what I would do. So before I get to that episode in that content, let's do a quick word from our fabulous sponsors. This episode of the Pavilion Podcast is brought to you by six sense. Six sense, the number one account engagement platform, helps you identify accounts that are in market for your solution, prioritizer efforts engage buyers the right way with highly relevant messaging and measure what actually matters. Sense customers report A to x increase in deal sized, ten percent improvement and opportunity conversion rates, twenty five percent reduction in deal to close time and one hundred and twenty percent improvement in revenue effectiveness. That's a lot of percentages. To learn more, you can visit them at six sensecom revenue collective. Again, I am on Linkedin. Tom lemo, I work at Gong. Can hit me up. I post every single day about sales in growth mindset and love to hear your feedback in the podcast. Without further ado, let's get into today's interview. All Right, I think we're live. Monday morning. Thank God it's Monday. We got people coming in. Give people a second to come on in. Feel free to hit up the chat if you want hit up a comment. This is my first time, so let's just get this out in the open right now. My first time going live. So there could be some technical difficulties. I don't see me on the video, so I don't even know if I'm on the video. I don't know if y'all can hear me. Hopefully you can I see some people join them, so spare me if you know you can't see anything or whatever. I got my man Lake on the chat, so you hit up the chat if you have questions, you have comments. Maybe you could start by just saying where you're, where you're dialing in from, where in the country or where in the world, and Lake will hit me up on the side with some good questions. So we're going to roll this thing like, I don't know, fifteen, thirty minutes and just shoot the ship. I want to start this for a few reasons. One, you know I've been talking a lot about scrs and the job market and things like that. It's super timely and, you know, hopefully this will add some value. Want to maybe do this every Monday or every other Monday to get people pumped up and get us off to a good productive week. Starting off the week here, no am Pacific Time. So what I want to talk about is how to find a job in the SCR market or in the AE market. Right now it's crazy. So here's the backstory. I got two people in my family right now, a cousin and a soon to be brotherinlaw, that our seniors in college looking to get into sales, looking to get into text sale. So I figured out throw out a linkedin post and just see. You know, maybe one or two people will comment. Someone's looking to hire them, maybe I can give them an intro, right A. put that out last week and I got over two hundred comments, and as not because I'm the man by any means. That's just because the market is hot. Two hundred comments from people, recruiters, heads of sales, sales managers, had of BEDR. All these different people hit me up asking for Intros, asking for interviews before they...

...even saw their resume. It was wild. I had the crow of a publicly traded SASS company DM ME on Linkedin, we've never talked before, and ask for both of their resumes and asked to get them hooked up. So again, that's not saying anything to my cloud, but that the market is hot right now. Whether you're trying to get into tech sales and you're trying to be an st we are, whether you're an scrt to current company and you want to find somewhere else to go because you know they're not treating you well or you don't think the path is where you want it to go, or if you're an AE trying to make that next move to either a better company or trying to get your pay up, or whatever it might be. You're trying to get to extra paid, to double down in Bitcoin right now and by the dip. Whatever you're trying to do, this is the time to fucking do it right now. So here's the first step about a lot of what I'm going to talk about is going to be for the scrs out there, because that was the original post. That's what I'm talking about. I think they could use a lot of help. But if you have questions specific for a e's in the market, again, throw them in the chat or the questions in the chat. My Guy Lake will hit me up, he'll text me, he'll let me know what the questions are and we'll get it going. But here's the step. I got a ten step process that I just came up with over the weekend that if you want to get a job in tech sales, this is what you should do. Okay, so the first thing. First, you got to know your why. Before we get into the nitty gritty of your resume or the interview or anything, or comp or salary, you got to know the why. Why do you want to get into sales? Over half of the people that graduated from college in two thousand and eighteen went into sales in some capacity. The vast majority of people end up quitting or hating it or not being as successful as they'd like, and the reason for that, among many others, is one reason is because you don't have a strong and of why. So here are a few examples of that. I talk to people all day long that have crippling tons, tons tons of student debt. You just graduated school, you got K A K A hundred fifty kve student debt. Sales is a great job to get into because you can control your destiny and how quickly you can pay that off and get closer to financial freedom. Maybe you, you know, are super competitive. I was a deto athlete Holler tennis in College, and so maybe that's your thing. Maybe you love, you know, working with people. Maybe you've done retail or cut code knives or sold vacuum cleaners or something like that. Someone in your family's in it, whatever it might be. If you are curious, if you're a hard worker, if you want, you know, no cap on what you can make financially. Those are all reasons that you might want to get into it. All right. So the second thing is you gotta get your resume and you got to get your linkedin profile sales ready. So see a lot of people out there that add me on Linkedin that have these catchy little headlines at the top. Let's say, something like aspiring SCR. I've got. There's one woman that I helped get an SCR job who her caption was like, you know, soon to be the coldest cold collar in the SASS world, like something like that. That is not just like I'm a student at X Y Z university or I'm an accountant. Right. To really know, one of my good friends and my sister actually traded professions. One was an accountant, one was a teacher and got into sales that way too. So even if you are an accountant, you're a teacher, whatever it might be, put something in your headline that says that you're an aspiring SDR or salesperson. Right. So, right when the person first sees your name, that's going to be that first indicator and then go out through your linkedin and in your resume. Do it both. Get everything sales focused right, everything that you've done what? Maybe you work construction, maybe you you know, did some social media, maybe had a good internship, whenever it might be. Even again, if you were had a full time job doing something else like teaching. Those skills relate and can...

...resonate over to sales big time, right. So put that and try to frame it in a context. For Yeah, you communicated clearly with all these people. Here's how your you managed your athletic and student workload in college to work on time management and teamwork and commitment. Here's how you know, you budgeted all these different things and you use numbers for you know, analyzes if you're in finance or in accounting, right. So you got to you got to think about how can I use these skills that I already have and make them kind of sound like they're ready for sales and a lot of them can be applicable anyways. So that's number two and again, any questions, as people are I see more people are rolling in. Hit it up in the chat. Questions, thoughts, feedback and I'll let you know what what I think. Number three, you want to figure out what you want and the specifics of the role. So my man Scott least who's a mentor and friend of Mine, put out a post today that pretty much says if you're looking at a job that is requiring you to be in an office, man that's old school. Whether we're talking pandemic or no pandemic, that's probably a way of the past and maybe you want to get into an office, but it probably shouldn't be a requirement that you need to get in there, especially five days a week. That is going to be a way of the past and any company that's doing that is probably going to need to rethink their strategy real quick. So the first thing you want to understand. Where do you live? Where do you want to work, or do you want to just be fully remote? Most job wrecks on Linkedin or on their company site are going to be very explicit and say you need to live in San Francisco or you need to live in New York, or it's remote, or maybe it's a blended hybrid approach. So you want to understand that. You want to understand that. You know any type of company, if you're interested in a certain type of technology or or product, you know maybe you're getting into like the CRYPTO world. There's a shit ton of opportunities for jobs to get into Crypto or web three. Maybe you're interested in, you know, finance, maybe you're interested in design, whatever it is, there's products that you can sell that can match your interest, and so if you have that, that's a good place to start, because you want to believe in whatever it is that you're going to be selling. If you don't know what that is, then that's cool too, you know, at some point sometimes a job is a job. But if you have some of those preferences, you should get that outlined. And the number one thing that I think you should be looking for, especially if this is your first or second sales job, is the learning opportunity. So let me break that down. COMP is great. The first year COMP is important. I Made Fort K and my first job coming out of college. That's nothing. You got an str job nowadays. I don't know the market super well, but you're probably, depending on where you're at, maybe making sixty, seventy eighty brand ote, so roughly double what I was making, and that's great. I don't want to demean the importance of camp, but when you're in your first or second sales job, the most important thing is who are the people you're working for. What is the culture of coaching and learning and development and how can you grow to be a better a better salesperson? Because the truth of the matter is, whether you're making K or ADK coming out of school, it really doesn't matter. If you don't get good enough, if you don't build the skills, then that's going to be your cap. You're going to be capped at that. But let's say you come in making K, you rough it out your inn str for a year or two years, we start to build, developing the skills, and you work for someone that you know. You can look at some of the leaders out there on linkedin there killing it. Like if you work for K D, Kevin Dorsey when he was at patient pop, your skill set is going to be so strong that you are going to be making one hundred, one hundred and fifty, two hundred, two hundred and fifty k within a few years after after graduation. And if that seems crazy to you as a college student or a first year employee or someone that's a teacher, whatever...

...you're doing, that is not crazy. If you get the the right skills and you can hit your quota to x three extra quota. You can absolutely be making, you know, well into the six figures within five years of graduating college, no doubt about it. And you can be making seven figures within a decade of being in sales if you have the skills and you're at the top top. If you want to learn more about that, go follow Ian Koonyac on Linkedin because the guys is amazing and he was one of the top reps at sales for so understand that. Will get more into the learning a little bit later. The fourth step check out. You know, linkedin jobs is the place to go. Don't like, don't bother. I don't know if people are using monster or glass door or whatever. Linkedin is the one stop shop. That is the place to go if you don't have a job opportunity and you're looking for one, that's the place to start. Literally, at the top of Linkedin there's home, there's my network and then there's jobs. Go there. You could type in sales development rep, Business Development Rep, SDR, B Dr, the location that you want and you're going to get dozens and dozens of job opportunities. The second ideas go to my post. I posted it about a week and a half ago. where I tried to hook up my to the two people in my family with jobs. Literally two hundred plus comments of people begging for SDRs to apply there. So go there. That's going to be your lead. So start clicking around those companies in those people. Maybe make a little spreadsheet with the names and you know some of the things. All Right, this company's located in San Francisco. Looks like a good culture. This one's in Chicago, whatever it might be. That's the first place to look. The second thing I do. This is step number five. If you really want to impress before you get to the interview stage, join a group, a community, a coaching program like vendition or aspireship. So if y'all aren't familiar, there's a few others out there that I'm blanking on some names, but vendition and aspireship are essentially programs that, if you are an aspiring SDR, you can go in they will train you for multiple weeks about all the things that you need as an SDR. How to cold call, how to cold the email, how do you sales for us? How do you sales engagement technology? You know how to Structure Your Day, all the things that someone would teach you, to prep you. They do it for free. There are some services out there that try to charge you or they try to take part of your pay. Do not join those. Take the ones that are free, and the thing that's in it for them is they then hook you up with an employer on the other side and the employer is happy to pay these middlemen because they've trained you up. And so instead of getting someone that's brand spanking new to sales, now of a sudden you've got someone that's got some real skills. They know how to use the technology, they know how to build engagement and so that you're more valuable. And so whether they actually hook you up with the job or not, it doesn't matter. Get the training. It's free, it's good. I know people hit up penelope at vendition, hit up Christine Rodgers at a spireship. What are a few others? There's flock Jay out there that are helping people of color specifically get in. There's US and technology that are doing the same. So if you're in that position, hit up one of those four vendition, aspireship, flock Jay, US and technology. I believe all four of them are free for you and are only paid for the company that's trying to hire you. If you're if they're asking you to pay, don't do it. That's a scam when you can get the same stuff for free. So don't. Don't ridicule yourself to that. That step five, step six, join other networking groups on Linkedin. So this would be one. Right. We're learning here, we're engaging. You can meet people in the chat. You can hit me up with questions. Again, feel free to put them in the CHAP, but go to it. You know, the next best thing that I would I would suggest is Thursday night sales. Again, my man Scott Lease and Amy Volas put on a phenomenal event every Thursday night. I think it's at five Ish Pacific. They put...

...it out and they get dozen, sometimes hundreds, of people join virtue truly where they just have real talk and people have gotten jobs, people have gotten promotions, people have gotten pay raises. There's a lot of good stuff that comes from it and they kind of just drop all the BS. They have real talk about whatever is going on in people's lives or careers and it's a stuper good program I couldn't highly recommended enough. And when you're in some of these groups. Look at who else is in there. Maybe it's someone that's in the same position as you, maybe it's a hiring manager, maybe it's someone that works at a company you want to work for. And Start Dming right. It's called social media for a reason. You don't need to just sit on and listen or sit on and watch or scroll right. Get in and start engaging with people. So again, that could mean asking questions, it could mean hitting up you know, me after this. It could be hitting up Scott Nam me after Thursday night sales. There's a ton of webinars out there, like Morgan Ingram puts on great stuff and in the Jay Barrows sales team. I could go on and on about great resources to to hit up. But just just start getting engaged, start experimenting and try to, you know, maybe meet one person every time you go on their DM. I'm Hey, you know, I thought this was cool. Looks like you're at a great company. Like would you be willing to chat? And I've made some great friends and great connections just by a DM on Linkedin, hop it on, a zoom call, you know, quote unquote, zoom coffee and and made great friends. May great connections, gotten jobs. Help people out. It's a great way to do it. So that's the six steps. So for people that have been joining in, you got to understand wire in sales. You got to understand you got to make your linked in and resume sales ready. That's number two. Number three, get specific on your search. Number four, go to Linkedin jobs, go to post like the one I had a couple weeks ago and go scour people to that you can hit up for your prospecting list. Number five, vendition, aspireship, flock, Jay US and technology all great resources. Number six, Thursday night sales. Hit that up as well. Number seven, now we're going to get into actually into prospecting into these jobs. Right. So you got your hit list right, you've got your linkedin jobs, you've got your people that you hit up on maybe my poster or otherwise, that you know are hiring. I mean people put out posts about hey, we're hiring at this company all day long. So go to that, make a little google sheet company, name the person's name, they're linked in, profile, link where the job is located, and then maybe a note section about other things that stand out about it. Great coaching culture, Cool Technology, whatever it might be. You got your list. Here's what you're going to do. Three steps. Number One, go figure out who the person is that's responsible for hiring, whether they put the post out or not. Add them on linked in. So and then a personalize linkedin request. Right. This is not creepy, this is not weird, this is sales. Say Hey, x, Hey Tom, saw that you were you were hiring over at Gong. Really Cool. I'm interested in getting into, you know, the tech sales world. I'd love to connect with you. That's it. Linkedin. Let them accept. They'll probably DM you back if they are hiring and say great, here's the application form, or hey, let's get on a call. Or you know, maybe you're not a fit for whatever reason. There might be a multiple sponsors. Then, after you add them on Linkedin, you go over to email. If you can't get their email, it's relatively easy. You can use a site like zoom infoe, which is got millions and millions of emails. You could probably find it in their linked in. You could just guess it. First initial, last name, type of stuff, and send them a three to five sentence email and the subject line put jobs at x company or your hiring position or something specific to the job. The first sentence make it very relevant. Hey, Tom, I saw your post about hiring it Gong and wanted to reach out. Tom, joined your linkedin live and...

...heard that you were hiring. Boom, saw your post on this comment, saw you joined this Webinar, saw you on Thursday night sales. Right, you have it very specific to that person and then you have two to three sentences about the meat of what you're asking. The reason I'm reaching out is that I saw you posted a job roll hire it looking for SDRs. I have experience in retail sales. I was in swimmer in college. I put together an art fair. I donate my time to charity whenever it might be. Why you think you're right for the role and I'm really excited about the opportunity at Gong space. Would you be open to connecting about this? Best Your name. That's four sentences, three to five, five at most, and the reason why it's got to be short? It's because these people get emails, like we all do all day long, hundreds of emails, and if they're opening it on their phone, you don't want to go past one scroll right. You want them to be able to see it. One Scroll and they can see your message and you ask a call to action at the end. That's just like yes or no, would you like to connect on this? They probably will write and that shows that you know what you're already doing the job. You're already doing a sales job all before you're even getting paid to do it. And then some of you here, most of you, will probably add them on Linkedin, some of you will go the extra step to email, and probably one person listening to this will do this last step. But I guarantee this person gets the job no matter what. Pick up the phone and call them. If you get the email or something from zoom INFO or seamless or another source like that, they're probably going to have their phone number there. To call them. It's not going to be perfect, you're going to be terrible. It's gonna it's going to feel awkward and Clunky if you've never made a cold call before. But if you if I put a post out about trying to hire an str and you called me on my cell phone and said, Tom I saw your post about hiring. I'm reaching out because I'm really excited and I think I you know I'd love to explore the opportunity with you. You're getting an interview no matter what. You could say anything else the rest of the call, you could throw up, it does not matter. I'm getting you an interview because you picked up the phone and you at least made an attempt to make a cold call. So if you want the job and that relates to a e's to whatever you're trying to get, go out there and get it. Don't just be blindly posting, you know, applying on Linkedin and crossing your fingers and hoping people get back. You've got to go out in there and get it. That's what sales all about. Sad. Step seven. You got a prospect in now let's say you've got a couple interviews. This is step eight, eight of nine. Right, we're almost there. We're almost home prepping. So the interview prep is super important. There's a few things I would do. Number One, go to the company's website. You don't have to spend a ton of time, but it's been fifteen minutes there. Click around, can you? Can you say what they do roughly in one sentence? Right? It's not going to be perfect. You might not understand the tech all the way or exactly what the product does, but can you at least get like the rough estimate of it? You need to be able to do that. Then go to the company's page. They'll usually be a resources tab and then like there'll be news or press releases or something like that. Go there and see what I some of like the news articles been or the press release has been in the last three months. So here's a few things you're looking for. One, you want something you know. Hopefully, if it's a good company, they're getting something going. There's they've been doing something in the last few months. It's exciting. A product launch, maybe they got funding, maybe they announced new customers. If they're public, they might have announced an earnings report, a bunch of if you know they hired a new executive, whatever it might be, you would least want to see that there's some forward progress there. It doesn't mean everything. There's plenty of companies that get funding that are not going to be successful or going to fail, but at least it's a good sign if some good momentum is happening. So you want to know what's going on and maybe take a few notes of that. If it's been recent, if it's happened in the last few weeks. Bring that up on...

...the call. They just got around of funding. Hey, Tom, sigon just got a huge round like congrats. That would be a great way to start the call. Okay, so you got that. You've got to go to the personal linkedin of the person that you're talking to or people that you're talking to, and take some notes on there as well. What have they done? Can you find anything that to connect with them on? Where they're from, what school they went to? Did they play a sport or were they in a club in college, volunteering? Do you know anyone that worked with them? You can see obviously mutual connections. If you have them, you can bring those up. Is there, hopefully, anything if they've been posting on Linkedin? Do you agree with any of the or disagree with any of the things that they've been posting? Hopefully you can find at least one thing. Try to find one thing you can bring to that interview. That's shows that you did your homework right, that you can go in there and it's not just hey, I'm Tom, I'm here for the job. You can start up by being interested in them right and say, Oh wow, like I saw you, man, you went to, you know, Boston College or Hey wow. You know you grew up in you know you grew up in San Francisco. You A niners fan as a you know, crazy game on Saturday, whatever it might be. Try to find a reason, try to find a way to connect with them. The next thing is you've got to have a few you got to have your questions ready to go for what they're going to ask you. They're going to ask you what your strengths are. They're going to ask you what maybe what your weaknesses are. They're going to ask you why you're interesting sales, why you're interested in that company. What is your you know what has made you successful? Name a time where you've struggled or had adversity. These are all very basic interview questions you could find on Google and you don't need to have a written out response, but you want to know in your head roughly, what will you say if and when they ask that thing right, and so it wouldn't hurt to write it down just so you can kind of think about it. Or definitely wouldn't hurt to roll play this with a friend or a family member or someone that might be mentoring you. And then the last thing for prep is to think of questions to ask them. So a few questions that might be helpful. One if they're not clear about some of the nonnegotiables for you. You need to know that. So whether that's where their low, where the job is located, if it's remote or not, things like that you want to have answers to. You don't want to waste your time if that's not going to be a fit for a very you know, specific reason, like out we already talked about learning. Learning again, if you weren't there earlier, is the number one reason you should join a company for your at least for your first or second sales job. I would argue maybe ever, but at least for your first or second. You want the skills that are going to end up making you more money and give you more opportunities down the line. So you want to ask them about that. You want to ask them what's the how do you coach? What's your leadership style? What can I expect in terms of, you know, Growth and coaching and development while I'm here? And here's the thing, y'all, the reason I'm doing this is because the this is simple economics. The supply and demand is way skewed. There are a ton, ton, ton of people looking for us to ours and there aren't that many strs out there right now. So you've got a lot of leverage. So if someone's coming in and they can't answer you how they're going to coach and develop you and they're just going to stick you on the phones and expect you to be, you know, an a player on day one, you don't. You don't want to go there. I know it's a job, I know it's probably going to be good money, but you're going to go there and you're either you're not going to be as successful as you'd like. You might figure it out, but you're not going to be as successful as you'd like if they're not in it with you, coaching you, trying to train you, trying to get you to be the best version of you, of yourself as a salesperson. So you want to ask them that and you want to come into that interview humbly, respectfully, but know you're worth know your value. If this was the if the job, if the supply and demand was skewed the other direction, we might be having a different...

...conversation you might just need to take a job and figure it out, and that's kind of how things were in two thousand and twenty. The tables have turned. There's never been a better time since I've graduated about seven years ago, to find a job in sales and to have the leverage for that. So you want to be confident and you want to make sure your questions are answered. So a few other questions that I would I like to ask you. Some interviews are are generally like? What separates people that have been successful versus not in the role? You might get a feel for whether the answers very common. You know, they weren't very good with their time. They you know they didn't work very hard, whatever it might be. It'll give you a sense for what the what the manager or hiring manager thinks. It also give you a sense of like, man, is that going to be something that I can do and natural with my skill set? So I would definitely ask that you know basic stuff like maybe when you know when you're starting, things like that. So I think all that is good. A quick side note. If you're an AE listening to this, I know most of this has been talking about str's first time salespeople. If you're an AE and you're trying to get like a bid market enterprise strategic ae job, you should absolutely be hitting up individual contributors at the company and getting the real deal. I know people that have gone him. They've prospected, they did their research, they did their due diligence on the company. They had someone that they knew you, that was in leadership. They negotiated the hell out of their comp they got a great deal, they got more money than they could imagine and they get in, Oh shit, I can't sell this product, this product stinks, or we're behind, or I'm an enterprise and this thing is not ready for security. This is like we don't have anything ready. Let's enterprise ready. Right. So you got to ask reps, and as an SCR you could do that, to hit up STRs on Linkedin. There's a ton of them active hit him up, say hey, Yo, I'm interviewing me, inter of you and at Gong I'm interview in an Xyz company. Can I talk to you for fifteen minutes? I'd love to hear what it's like. They're and you'll get the real deal from reps, right. You'll get it real cut no BS from a manager. How is it there? Are you making money? Are you making quota? Is the product sellable? Is the manager cool? Are They coaching or they developing? They care about my wellbeing? Do they care about my mental health? You know, is it diverse? Like anything that you care about, you can get the real talk and I highly suggest as part of the interview process, you hit up one, two, three individual contributors, people doing the job you're applying for, and try to get it. And then I bring that all back to my you know, I'm old school. I'd bring it back to my spreadsheet, my Google Sheet, Mi Excel, and say here's the companies, here's what they say, and then do some sort of like a stack rank. You know, this company looks good, it's remote, but man, the AE said the quotas are way too high, you know. Or and this one, oh, it's you know. I got to go in an office two days a week, but they said, man, they're making bank over there. That's the are. So the coaching is off the charts. I'm learning more than I ever could have imagined. You know, the VP of sales really gives a shit about me and my career. All right, that's something to be really considered. It's I put all that out into a spreadsheet and try to figure it out that way. And the last step for when you're actually in the in the interview, you got to close, y'all, you ought to close and follow up. This goes back to you're doing the sales thing before you're even in sales technically right. So, the end of the call, say it's a thirty minute call, I'd say with five minutes left, put a timer on your phone, keep your eye in the clock, whatever you got to do, and say, Thomas, is a great conversation. You know, I'm really interested in the opportunity at Gong. Can we talked through with the next steps? Are you know for the opportunity or is there anything that you see that would hold you back from hiring me? It's going to be again uncomfortable if you haven't been doing anything sales related to ask those questions, but trust me, the hiring manager will respect that. They will like that. It'll show that you're not afraid to ask the questions and again it's just a sign of set, you know, being able to...

...do the sales job before you're there. So I think that's definitely something that you should be checking out, or definitely something that you should be doing, is try to close them and then you follow up right the same three to five sentence thing tom thanks so much for the conversation about the job today. You follow up the same day. Thanks so much for the opportunity. Know for the opportunity and for the conversation. What I really liked about the conversation pick out one thing that stood out to you, right, and make sure you're taking notes during the call. One thing. Well, I really liked how you said that you do a coaching call with everyone on your team every Tuesday, like I think that's a great idea for you, know, helping the team to make sure they're developing and going towards their goals. I loved hearing about the emphasis on having a good time and having fun that, you know, the Friday happy hours that the team does. I really wow. Like I loved hearing about your passion for the product and what it's doing to help our customers problems, whatever it might be. You want to show that one thing that you took away and then you know, at the end, say looking forward to hearing from you on the next steps or if you already close the next step on the call and let's see, have another call on the calendar. You know, looking forward to our call on Tuesday or I'll look forward to hearing from susie about the next step, because sometimes they'll have the recruiter hit you up or whatever it might be right and so all of that, make sure you send that the same day to anyone that you talked to. And even if you don't want the job, you don't want to burn a bridge. You still you'd rather you not want the job and then try to hire you then the reverse. Then you want it and they're not they don't want to hire you. So even if you didn't love the company, you didn't love the the hiring manager for whatever reason, I'd still send that note. It takes a couple minutes out of your day and you'd never want to burn a bridge. You always want to leave the best impression possible and so still send that three to five sentence email. And the last step you want to get multiple offers right, you want to get out there and go through the process with multiple companies at the same time. And in a perfect scenario you're at the end of the interview with two to four, two and twenty five companies and you got a couple offers because you work the system and if things aren't working for you, if you're not getting enough hits, that means you got to go back to step, whatever it is, seven, and start adding more people on Linkedin and start emailing more people applying on Linkedin, calling following up like you've got to get that motion, going to get a pipeline of job ops and if you do that and you have five or ten that you're working at the same time, you're going through ten interviews. I know that sounds daunting and it will be for a few weeks, but what you'll have at the end is your pick of the litter if you do the right steps. Two to four, to five job off first, and then you can compare and contrast and you got your sheet that you've taken notes on. What you think of the leader, what you think of the pay, what you think of the situation of remote or not, the coaching, the learning, the product, all those different things. You can kind of stack those up. Everyone's going to be different on what they care about and their particular situation. Maybe you do need more, more cash right now, because that's your life situation. That's all good. Again, I highly recommend trying to overwait on the learning because that's going to give you so much more leverage in the future. But, you know, if you can't move for the job or you you want to be remote or whatever it is, stack rank that and then close out on the offer. And so if you're in college, listen to this. I got a job offer when I was like it was like November of college. So I just as long as I didn't get kicked out and I got decent grades the last semester, it was all good. And if you're another job or you're hunting in you know, lock in that that offer, close it out and get ready for your next thing. If you could take some time off in between, you know, that's obviously great. If you can negotiate a couple weeks or a month or...

...two even to go travel or go take time off with family or, you know, backpack around, you toad, I don't know, whatever you want to do, I'd highly recommend that too. So those are the nine steps. This is going to go out live. I appreciate you everyone for sticking with me, rocking with me. Didn't know if anyone was going to join. Again, if there's any tech difficulties of anything happened, I'm sure I'll hear about it. But thank you for bearing with me and being patient. This is going to go live on the PODCAST, so millennial sales podcast, spotify and apple. Hit US up YouTube. We're going to go live on Youtube, putting things on there every single day. So it's Tommy Tahoe on Youtube Linkedin. Obviously you're here, so hit me up a post every day. I would love if you left in the chat or dmed me your feedback, positive, neutral or otherwise. Oh, Lake, saying that we got some questions. Hit Me with a few questions. Like, I don't I cannot see the chat, but if people are still on and we got some questions, I can. I can take them. I cannot see the chat, though. Oh, we got some questions, Brian Mars, oh, talking shit. I got you, Rohan. Gee, sorry that I didn't see this until until right now. Hey, tom do you need cold call experience as an SCR discold outreach via email won't work. You don't. So it depends on the job. Let me say I know some that there se our leaders that want someone that has that has some sort of cold call experience, in which case, if you wanted that job, maybe you should take a you know, you could do an internship somewhere. I sold cut coe knives and we had to do a lot of cold calling there at that for a summer in college. I know people do like home security or vacuums or verizon or a bunch of other things if they really want that experience, but you don't. You don't need it, because then scrs really, for the most part, going to be that first step into sales. I think you want some you want to give yourself a leg up. If you don't have any experience, though, I think a few things you could do would be to, like I mentioned earlier, go through some of those courses like vendition, aspireship, flock Ja us and technology, those four. Check those out because they're going to give you the horses on how to do a lot of this stuff and if you say that in an interview and you put that on your resume, that's going to look good and at least show that you've been making an effort. There's also courses on you know, there's a ton like John Barrows has great courses and content about sales. You could take a number of different like sales training, things to at least show that you've made the effort in in send an emails or cold calls or stuff like that. So I would definitely recommend doing that. But you do not necessarily need sales experience or cold call experience to get nesty our job. I think that's a Brian Marzoh talking smack. I love you, Brian. I don't know if you're still on, but I appreciate everyone that came on here. I think that's it. That's all I got from Lake. So again, we're going to try do this every week, every other week, something like that. Stay tuned, I'll be posting about it. Hit US up millennial sales, on spotify, on Youtube and follow more on Linkedin. Otherwise it's Monday without the whole week ahead of us. Let's get after it, y'all. Peace. All right, that episode was brought to you by six sens, powered by AI and predicted analytic. Six sense helps you unite your entire revenue team a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue growth. Again, hit me up on Linkedin. My name is Tom lemo. I work over a gong. Would love to hear your feedback. Until next Monday will be back them with another episode get after its.

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