The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Ep 185: Founding a RevOps Company w/ Seamus Ruiz-Earle

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 185: Founding a RevOps Company w/ Seamus Ruiz-Earle

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the pavilion podcast. I am your host, Brandon Barton and you're listening to is this a good time the show where I put pavilion members in the hot seat for 15 minutes. We hear their great stories, shows around Tuesdays and Thursdays hit subscribe and you will not miss hearing from our experts. Our guest today is Sheamus raise Earl, He is the Ceo of the Caribbean, a group we talk about founding a robotics company in the midst of a pandemic. Such an incredible human Sheamus is can't wait for you to hear his story. This episode is powered by show pad, the open end to end platform that makes me to be buying and selling easier, transform your team to have high impact and differentiated customer conversation in today's environment. I want to see a revenue enablement technology that provides every customer facing team with required skills, knowledge and content to have impactful conversations with your buyers, head to show pad dot com to learn more. Alright, everyone's super excited to have Sheamus Reese URL here with me, he is the Ceo of the Caribbean a group got a chance to meet...

Seamus when he came into new york for the Pavilion ceo offsite dude, good to have you on the pod. Thanks for having me on. It's a pleasure to be here. Well look man, you know, coming out of that meeting which we had in december, kind of fun to meet so many of the C E O s in the Pavilion group. You know, I think there was at least five or six people who were trying to invest in your company. So I'm excited to jump into what you're doing, it's super interesting. All meat. No filler. Welcome back to 2022 here. Let's jump right in. Tell us a little bit about your current role and how you got here. And if I remember correctly, did you drop out of college? You know, So I, I did finish, so I currently running Carabiner group, right, We're a fractional robots consulting firm. We're specializing now in the combination of, of really the hands on keyboard work that you need. The tactics as well as bringing in kind of that high level rev up strategy and we do it all in a fractional basis. Right? So how I got here right previously, I've worked as, you know, a techno functional salesforce guy across startups across financial services, but really right? Like this was my first...

...job out of high school that I wanted to break into kind of the investment banking space, right? There's a whole long saga, but I continued doing it through college as sort of a way to give me some liquid herbal income. Little did I know, kind of, I would, I would take a hard left turn and you know, start up this company. What brought you to starting this up, I mean that that's quite a leap to, to start up your own business and certainly at your age, right. Some of the things that I noticed in your linkedin profile, you know, you were a teenager when you became a trail head ranger, right in salesforce. So like you have some of these milestones that you got to at an early age and then you said, look, I'm just gonna go do it on my own. That takes a lot of guts to, you know, to tell our audience about that. Yeah. You know, I I grew up in the Bay Area, right, Silicon Valley born and bred and it was always one of those things that I had very little interest actually and starting my own company, I I saw too many of them fail and it was one of those things that I wanted something secure and really what what gave me the push was the pandemic. Right? So I had a full time job offer, Working for...

...arguably the, you know, the leading salesforce consulting agency and I was ready to go, I was going to be there for 40 years. I was excited. And then the pandemic hit and my start date got delayed by nine months. And if there's anything in this world that I know is that I can't sit still for nine months. And so I've been consulting all through college, I'd had two or three different clients that I've been working almost full time for by that point. So I figured why not trying to make something of this and see what I can get to in nine months and little did I know right, that this would turn into something significantly larger than my expectations. That's great man, that's it. It's it's so good to know that there is, there are stories I know that other people have stories like this of success during the pandemic. A lot of people have the opposite. It's cool to hear that you you know, we're able to make this transition and take the sleep during that time. I got to bring me back to like it's not often that you'll get somebody who's in their teenage years that wants to learn Salesforce, where did that come from? Where did the...

...idea to just start? It seems like you were noodling around and just happened to get really good at Redbox. It's happenstance, right, I call salesforce like the biggest technology that no one under 22 has ever heard of, right? Like it's so ubiquitous right? It's everywhere everybody uses it, but it's not taught the same way as word or excel, right. And so My first job in salesforce was actually a result of me trying to get a job in investment banking. So at 17 I cold called about 25 different banks in San Francisco and was trying to get a job, any job that I could put that I worked for an investment bank because that was what I had wanted to be and that's what I wanted to do for a career and they all said kind of the same thing that you're 17 go be a kid back, you know, in, in, in a couple of years. But one finally gave me a shot, you know, not as an analyst, which is what I wanted, but Salesforce has just released lightning in, you know, in the last 18 months before that and they needed someone to handle this transition. So I've never...

...heard of Salesforce before, but I spent the next six months in my college dorm room on trailhead figuring out for lack of a better turn. And then when I went back for the summer, I did it for the summer and then I carried them on for over two years working, You know, about 20 hours a week with that client. So You know, I, I just got addicted. It was giving me access to the CFO of the investment bank 25 years earlier than I should have had access to the CFO of the investment bank. And I mean that type of exposure was just invaluable. I love it. And I think people who are listening to this podcast, I'm sure. No, but go through your definition of robots like what is the goal of what Caribbean a group does for a company. What stage of a company do you look at and and say, look, we should really help this size of a company. Well, the traditional kind of rev ops model has always been, you know, the intersection of marketing sales service, right? And really making sure all those systems are working together, all the operations are working together. And we certainly played to that as well and that we think maximizing your revenue potential is really the goal of of robots and making sure all those...

...systems work together and aren't siloed, you bring up a good point of like when would we work with an organization And and traditionally like a red box professional would join somewhere in the post funding series a looking to series B somewhere in that range. But we actually believe that as soon as as kind of like a seed stage, if you can get somebody fractional right? Which is what we're offering then you can start avoiding big pitfalls that you face along the way, avoid all of the issues of siloed technology and and hopefully springboard you ahead on that hockey stick a little bit faster. So realistically robots from you know, a seed perspective all the way through to post I. P. O. Is going to be a big part of your organization. It's just how can you get there in you know a way that adds value without adding too much overhead. Love it. Yeah, I totally agree with that. It feels like if if the first time you bring on the robots person their first job is to clean up all the crap for like six months that that has been not paid attention to, you know, during the first couple of years of the company. So maybe you're...

...like the best friend of the rev up then the actual full time hire of the rev Ops person because you actually have things in line by the time you want to hire them. So cool. By the time you hire someone, you're going to expect that person to do three persons jobs and across a myriad of technologies that frankly it's impossible for one person to know intimately. Right. So, you know, a real full rev ops organization at this point has 5, 10 people working in it who all have their own specialties and niches, you know, that's freaking expensive, right to maintain and scale. So, you know, you might have a strategist who comes in, but they're going to have to go hire a whole bunch of people in order to actually get the stuff done. It's a crazy space we're in. It is, it is well, look, success, you know, it's always made up of hard work and luck what what's an example from your life and career of, you know, either one of those, frankly, I I'd like to focus on carabiner. Right? As as an example, right? And just under 15 months, we've scaled rather quickly, Right? 20 full time team members, no funding entirely self funded. I think that that speaks an awful lot more to the space that...

...we're in and the time that we're in rather than my own quote unquote genius. Right? Like that's, that's not what's happening here. It's really more so, had a good idea at the right time and we're approaching it in the right way where people are empathizing with it. So don't get me wrong, we're putting in the long hours that are necessary to be successful. But a lot of this is luck and market timing as well. Well look, I I appreciate that because honestly, it's hard for leaders of the team leaders of a company founders to recognize the amount of luck that, you know, can be bestowed on them for timing, right? Like, so I totally appreciate that you can say that and not maybe one of these people who are like that. You know, there is no luck. I made my own luck. You know, you had a great idea. The timing also followed along. Right? So cheers to you for being humble enough to say that I do bet that all the hard work that you put into doing trailhead and as a college student and all the nights that you probably weren't partying and you were doing that instead has led to this opportunity for you as well. So let me...

...give you credit, their trailhead is a different type of party. Yeah, I mean there's certainly elements of this, that we just approach things slightly differently, right? We're coming at this from a myriad of backgrounds, right? My, my team members, right? Cliff Simon and louis kearney right there, very talented folks who know exactly what they're they're doing in their own fields. And so I do think we're we're uniquely poised, right? It's a confluence of, of talent as well as the timing. But humility is a virtue, you know, that I've worked on for a long time, that's necessary in this world. I love it, man, love it. You're, you're wiser than your years. Give us your best sales and marketing tactic. And like if you want to go into a little bit of like what's a red box trick that, that people should be, you know, employing, well, you know, let's start with the sales and marketing tactic, right? I think I have a term alternative talent and that's one that that I think people are hopefully y zing up two more now and then, but people who just don't fit your average mold of who you would want to bring onto your organization right there too young, they're too old. Their stay at...

...home, mom, they're returning veteran, whatever it might be. They didn't go to Berkeley for computer science, right? Like those people by and large have an awful lot of talent and skill to bring from other areas and you're able to use those to augment your organization. So, you know, an example is when I was first getting started, I hired six college students to form a content creation team that basically made up the marketing department right between them. I had a graphic designer, a copy editor, a blogger, a website developer to social media managers. Right. And that was all for less than a full time employee. And they were all eager to learn what they lacked in experience they absolutely made up for with enthusiasm. So our model there has continued to pay fruit, right? I'm traveling to Tampa to interview a navy seal, you know, in a couple of days to bring him on board, hopefully as a sales higher, right? Like that's not the traditional person you might bring on for that role, but there's other parts, right? The auxiliary pieces are what really make us a strong group. And so I encourage people to really...

...consider that and figure out where you can get talent in a place that now, frankly, right. A talent quote unquote shortage that's driving salaries through the roof and, and making it hard for folks to scale. I love it. Speaking of hiring us, give us a key position you're hiring for. Well, we're currently looking for everybody, right? Like we're, we're looking for red bumps professionals, we're looking for salesforce admin. So we're looking for hubspot experts, right? Like we're looking for all of that. I'd say the one key position that we're really interested in right now is bringing on a red bumps architect to lead our strategy division. We're learning now that people really want that zero level advice on an ongoing basis and there's not enough of that to go around and so we're going to build a division around that that can offer that to our clients, interesting. Great love it. And then give some shout outs, people that are either up and comers or folks that you like really appreciate their content and kind of learn from, I'd say one in the rev up space in particular Asia, corvette robots. Extraordinaire just...

...has a really unique insight on everything revolves right? It's it's an emerging space, some would say and and she has a strong voice, some up and comers. A good friend of mine name is Jimmy McDermott, he's the cto of trans ceo just made the Forbes 30 under 30 list just he's a couple of months older than me so he and I are good friends kind of going through stuff at the same level but he's doing some crazy stuff over there. So I I'd say keep an eye out for him, awesome, I love it man. And then of course my the most important question to me, this doesn't change in the new year here. Give us a restaurant, we should go to, some place that you love. Oh goodness, I'm gonna mix it up if you're ever in the san Jose area, there's falafels drivin and falafels drivin is it's been here, I'm a I'm a history guy, I'm I'm a traditional san Jose, my family's been here for a long long time. This was here when the orchards were here. Right? And it's this Middle Eastern family came you know to the state's 80 years ago and built this falafels drivin. It's been there, it's been the same family running it ever since and the...

...food is fantastic guy. Fieri reviewed it right, It's just really, really great and it's the same, right? And I really like the fact that with so much change that's happening in the world and so much change that's happening in Silicon Valley, right? It's all the same and it's dependable. Love it man. Love it. Well, Seamus, so awesome to chat. Thanks for coming on man and and and really just pumped for all the success that you've had. Congrats and looking forward to keeping keeping an eye on you guys as you continue to grow. Thanks Brandon, Good to be here. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in the apple podcast Spotify app, send it to some friends or make sure to smash that subscribe button. Moving podcast is powered by show pod for opportunity preparation or opportunity execution. Show pad is everything your team needs to add value, provide insights and engage with your customers. Want to learn more about show pad, Head to show pad dot com for personal assessment of your enablement turn. I had so much fun today. I hope you did too. Now get out there and crush your numbers.

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