The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 3 months ago

Ep 123: A Career in Food Tech w/ Erica Anderman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 123: A Career in Food Tech w/ Erica Anderman

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone. Welcome back to thePavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon Martin you're listening to. Isthis a good time to show where I put Pavilion members on the hot seat for 15minutes. I asked some questions. A lot of fun. This one's going to be fun.Erica Anderman is with us. She's a VP of sales and restaurant partnershipsthat seated and she spent her whole career in Food tech. So we're gonnatalk a lot about that and certainly it's a place in a space that I love asI've spent my whole career in food tech. This episode was brought to you bydrift. More than 50,000 businesses use drift to grow revenue and increasecustomer lifetime value faster drift, helps their customers online sales andmarketing on a single platform to deliver unified customer experiencewhere people are free to have a conversation with businesses at anytime on their terms, learn more at dot com. Alright, let's do this episode 57.Is this a good time? All right. It's so...

...great to have Erica Anderman with me.She is the VP of sales and restaurant partnerships at seated. Eric and I knoweach other for way longer than just being pavilion friends. Erica, thankyou for being here. Of course excited to be here. All right, well look, I'llmeet no filler. We can bullshit forever, but let's just jump right in. Let'sgive the people what they want. Tell us about your current role and the paththat you took to get here. Yeah, of course. So I currently oversee therevenue or get seated. We are an app to discover local restaurants. You getrewarded for dining out or ordering in. Previously, I have actually been infood tech for pretty much my whole career. I got started in college, Ihelped a company called Campus Food which was coming down, it was the firstonline ordering to come to college campuses, which dates me at the time.Super exciting. I actually went up to their office in new york and just likefell in love with the energy of the sales team in new york and new, Iwanted to be a part of it, so I was...

...fortunate and got introduced to WileySurly, who is the ceo of single platform. So I joined single platformas one of the earliest employees, stayed there for about five yearsthrough the transition to constant contact and then endurance. And then Imoved over to slice where I was also one of the earliest employees um andhelped run the revenue teams, their love it and you and I both share thisis our entire careers have really been related to restaurants have been inrestaurant tech. Wiley's perhaps one of the kind of godfather entrepreneurs ofrestaurant tech in a way it feels like so many people who are involved inrestaurant tech today have connections to single platform, it's like uh andeven within Pavilion, I think somebody mentioned that a recent happy hours,like you can't throw a rock in new york without hitting an old single platformperson or yes, that was the other one,...

It's but you know, I've worked withplenty of people outside at this point of the original crew and I do thinkit's just pretty incredible how many just amazing people we had there, whichis a credit to Wiley and the team, but I mean I'm guilty, I actually justhired a new director of customer success that was a single platform, sotry to put into words what was so special about that. Yeah, you know, itis always good to be honest, I reflect on it a lot of like what works so wellthere and I think what it was is just a simple mission and bringing everyone injust super excited to build something exciting and excellent training. So webrought on really good people, you put them through the sales training thateveryone went through, everyone was part of a class and the culture wasjust one where we all knew why we were there, what we were building towardsand we loved the people we were working with and just the fast growth, right?Like we from when I joined november 2010, less than two years we sold $100million like I, that's what I thought...

...startups for all about after that, so Iwas like wow this is fun. So yeah, I mean I think a lot of it was just umhiring the right people and making sure everyone was really aligned around thatvision admission. Yeah. And then moving over to slice, Imean you have another person in a Lear who is an incredible entrepreneur, butlike even more passion for the mission. I mean, nobody cares about theindependent pizza operator more than slice. I mean, what would give me onetakeaway from working in that environment between him and Pete andall these other amazing leaders? Yeah, absolutely. And you hit it right on thepoint there is that it really is about everyone understanding that largermission. And for me, you know, I raise it all the time of like how importantit is that everyone understands what you're working towards. And really just,it didn't matter what seat you took when you know that what your overallgoal is to help these local pizzerias...

...compete against the big chains, likeevery single person at the company noticed that and so no matter whatyou're working on, you know, you're aligned on knowing that that's whatyour focus is. The other really special thing about slice is we built out ouroperations in eastern europe and this little known where a leers family isfrom and when I first started there and they were like Erica build out theaccount management team, but not in new york, they've got to be built out, youknow, out in Macedonia and I was like, I couldn't even point out where it wason a map when I first started, but once I went out there and just met thepeople, there was just this really special connection where they were soexcited to work for this american company. So many pizzerias are owned byimmigrants where I would go out to the office and we have an account managerdoing an on boarding and Turkish another one you know saving an accountin spanish and then another person talking and you know it's just Albanian,it was wild and it was just this really awesome mix of you know theseimmigrants small business owners in the...

US talking to these account managerswho were so grateful for the opportunity that we gave them out therethat it was just something really special that I I imagine in this placeI always think about this place in Macedonia because I feel like the wholetown worked for slice so I can't wait to go there and be like I know a Learand then like the whole the whole place is there'll be a festival uh you knowjust because you know him. So anyway. Um Well yeah I know like the amount ofpeople, it's kind of like went up, you know, observed was out of providence. Ifelt like everyone they they must have hired everybody in providence to workand observing the amount of people that work there anyway, we're just gossipingso hard work and luck Tell me a story from either or both. Yeah. You know,I'm I'm pretty strong on on hard work leads to luck. You know, I one story Iguess I'll share is my kind of first year at single platform. I had no idea.You know what I wanted to do if I...

...wanted to sell. I was a marketing major.I was really young and they brought me on to sell and manage my own accountsfrom a sales perspective since I was brand new, they put me on pretty muchwhatever was needed at the time it was setting meetings, it was before SDRSwas a term and my job was to fill our head of sales calendar every single dayand with meetings. And I took that quite literally where I went on pagesdot com and I just called every single restaurant right near each otherbecause I was very particular about making sure that he didn't have to movearound too much and could go door to door in each neighborhood. And I justsat down at the time was probably a cardboard box and I called every singleday I didn't speak to anyone else at the business. And so a year later KennyHerman who's, you know, he was on the exact unit single platform now one ofmy closest friends, but he always tells a story about how like we didn't knowErica spoke for the first year, like I didn't talk to anyone internally at thecompany, I was so intimidated and just nervous about kind of I just wanted todo a great job now, you know, they joked that you can't get me to shut up,but I believe that like, by doing that...

...by just doing the job exactly what Iknew my job was, and just doing the best job at it, that's what has gottenme tapped on the shoulder to continue to take on new roles and newinitiatives is because people trust to know that, you know, if I'm going toown something, I'm going to do it right. I love having employees who if you handthem something, you just don't have to look back at the name and they willcome to you when there's problems but like just get that shit done and I lovethat, That's great. Alright, what are you what are you crying for? Oh sorry,no, no, no, start, go back. Give me a tactic, You're like the queen oftactics. You had every which way that you'd get restaurant able to give usone tactic, get like an smb to pick up the phone. One thing we always try toturn it on is turning it into the buyers mentality, right? In terms oflike, you know, we're not just asking you to be on at a meeting, but talkingabout how we're choosing you a lot of it back at single platform was, we werebuilding lists of options for the Hilton group at the time of, you know,dining options in the area, we're...

...considering you as an option. You know,you're one of the better steak houses in the, in the West Village. Wereconsidering adding you guys as an option, would love to talk to the ownerto see if you'd be a good fit. You just completely flip it and you know, nowyou're selecting them, you are the one that's in control and it just changesthe conversation a lot less of like, you know, will you consider us and alot more of, you know, we have a limited number of spaces and we'reconsidering you, which just changes the conversation. I know this tactic frommy friend Karen Ellemann employed it there for sure. So I love a good Okay,now, what are you hiring for? Yeah. So right now, I actually just told you Ifilled my director of customer success role, which I'm excited about. We arehiring for a sales ops, admin or kind of, you know, someone to lead sales ops.It's underneath Natalie marshall who runs robots for us, who's a completebadass, she's amazing. So she's a great person to come and work for. So yeah,someone who's looking to get into sales...

...ops and helped lead that for us. That'ssomething we're currently hiring for. I feel like that's such a, it's such anice role to go into if you want to, if you don't know where you want to be insales yet go there, go do sales up for a year and you'll figure it out fromthere. Exactly, yeah, it's actually story Natalie who's running red box forus. She started in sales, then moved over to on boarding and then she alwayswanted to be the one working on the reporting. She always was so interestedin the reporting aspect that we gave her that because we knew that that wassomething eventually the girl with the phones to work on that and she's justcompletely taken it made it her own and because she had both the sales and postsales experience before, it's just made her so much more effective. So yeah,you get a real view of the whole business. I mean like sales ops, peoplecan, can predict revenue, they can tell you if a company is going to besuccessful, Not exactly working at on red box at a marketplace is also reallyfun. Supply demand. You know, dynamics...

...is one thing I just love looking ateach week and it can get really fun if you're into it. Love it. And who do yougive some shout outs? Like who do you dig their content and, or like up andcomers that you'd want to shout out? Yeah, sure. So content wise, one personI just, I had the pleasure of meeting earlier on in my career who have turnedto a lot is cassie Young, she's an operating partner at primary. She wasformerly the C. R. O. It sailed through. She's just like so smart. Um She hasreally helped it just from a data perspective. She's so good. It justlooking at you know she's a lot of good content. She puts out about doingcohort analysis the right way and how to segment out you know, your customerbase. But I just think she's one of the smartest women and just a great personto learn from. And then another one actually kat cole. She recently joinedthe board at slice. She was just an incredible story, she was like awaitress at Hooters and then worked her...

...way up to become VP at Hooters and theneventually just completely took on, she became ceo of focus friends so just anincredible career and now does a lot of content on leadership and just like howto run a company with empathy. I really like the content she puts that also Ido as well. She's she's very inspiring, generally a really cool person. So it'scasting by the way cool and last but not least very important to both of uswhere we eat and give me, give me a secret. Give me give me any like whatgive me one secret of where we should go eat together. It depends. I mean ifyou want where I currently am which is actually in L. A. Versus where I willsay pizza is kind of the thing even though I'm no longer at slice, but mostpeople come to me for pizza so we could do either. You want tacos and what'syour secret in new york? What's your what's your secret slice spot? Not not,not pies like underground slice spot. So I'll say one that most people don'tknow about. There's a place in the east...

Village called Village Square. Theyopened up a few years ago. The guy is actually from the original printsstreet family. There's a lot of drama there. I don't want to be included.Whoa. I do know that they have a slice that is just as good if not better thanthe infamous Prince Street slice. So she definitely check it out. Wow thatis big talk. We're going to go check it out. We're gonna do a taste test whenyou're back in new york. I would love to go to both blind. I'm gonna give ita blind and you're not gonna be able to see and we're going to see if that'sactually true. America sounds great, incredible. I literally, we could talkforever. I really appreciate you and what you've done and the way youbrought up women as well into sales orders and like really been a beacon ofkind of happiness in the restaurant sales community, right? Like therestaurant tech sales committee. Love it. So great to follow all the stuffthat you're doing, can't wait to see...

...what's next and uh keep in touch.Absolutely great talking to you. Thanks for having me. Alright, that is ourshow for today. So thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, dothe things I'm telling you right now, rate it. Just go right now, read fivestars Apple podcast. Spotify, send it to one friend or just hits a bag. Easystuff just for me, remind this episode is brought to you by drift. The new waybusinesses by from businesses. You can learn more and get the conversationstarted at drift dot com. I had fun today. I hope you did too not go crushyour numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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