The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

Ep 195: Focus on What Matters w/ Fred Mather

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Ep 195: Focus on What Matters w/ Fred Mather

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello and welcome back to the pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon Barton. You are listening to is this good time? The show where I talk to pavilion members, ask some questions, say get back with anches. It's fun. Every week shows are out on Thursday, so please have subscribe and do not miss hearing from our experts. Our guest today is Fred mather. He is a CO founder of advised. Well has that an incredible career, touching a lot of different areas, including Sass, and we talked a lot about this idea of focusing on what matters, but within your business, and also go some good tidbits about when you're being hired, what you should be asking about. This one's sponsor is six six sense, the number one account engagement platform, helps you identify accounts that are in market for your solution, prioritize your efforts, engage buyers the right way with highly relevant messaging and measure what actually matters. Sense customers reported to x increase and deal size, ten percent improvement in opportunity conversion rates, twenty five percent reduction in deal to close time at a hundred percent, twenty percent improvement in revenue effectiveness to learn more...

...of visit nscom revenue collective. All right, let's see this episode ninety five. Is this good time? All right, everybody, I am here with my friend, friend mather. He is a CO founder or advised, well also an executive vice chairman at Pavilion. Fred is one of the OG revenue collective AK pavilion members. Freds, so great to have you on the pod. Finally, fantastic care brand that. I know that we've been trying to get this going for a while and so finally here we are, two thousand and twenty two, hopefully a better year for everybody and you and me finally get to chat. So I'm excited to do this. Love it, man. Well, look, I'll meet no billary. Jump right in. You have such an incredible career. Bring us through. You know the height, some of the highlights of it before. You know the whole pavilion thing and advice well, and tell us a little bit and then go into Advis well and what you're doing today and tell the audience what with that company's own now, yeah, let's do that. I mean I it was interesting when I was completing the survey for you and advance. You know there's that one section...

...where you said, well, tell us where the hard work happened and tell us where the luck happened. And you know, I do think I've been very fortunate on the luck side of things. And you know you could debate me that. You know the thought and plan that goes into how your career plans out. But you know you you hope you pick up good company that is in a hot segment with a large market opportunity and you've got all the right people around you in the product has good fit and off you go. But you still need to be in the right place, right time, and I feel I'd been extremely lucky in that regard. Well, the sort of headline is this is that I spent a big part of my early career in traditional businesses, in financial print, and that was primary in the UK, a little bit here, but really sort of relevant, I think this conversation today. It's been mostly over the last twenty five years in Sass and a little bit of Ad Tech Type Businesses, and I've been lucky enough to run sales, in some cases marketing, some cases the operating side of businesses too, but always with a tendency towards the commercial side of the House. I always also love the idea of working in industries and segments that are not familiar...

...with and enjoying their ability to sort of, you know, take, you know, portable and transferable skills and experiences and applied it in different places and through that get the opportunity to learn areas that I'm unfamiliar with. So I've worked in automotive, in financial services and healthcare and ECOMMERCE, a whole variety, and it's been exciting to sort of experience all that. And today, yes, I mean advise well, and I sort of, I suppose, hung up my sort of full time working boots about four or five years ago now and sort of dabbled with consulting and actually Sam and I did a couple of things initially together and in fact some of the things that Sam and I did from a formerlier and process standpoint around consulting are still persisting today within the advisor or modeling. May Get to that in a second. What I found with that is that, you know, there was really an opportunity to structure a firm that might be a little bit different from tipple consulting, both in the models and we followed as we looked at companies, but also to apply...

...advisory services and also investing side to the business as well. So I sort of trickled through a couple of iterations of that consulting practice and then we formed advice well about a year or so ago, and that's what we're now doing. Consulting advisory, advising companies on they go to market strategies and plans, advisory, and on the investing side. We can unpack a course those a little bit, if you like. Yeah, for sure, a pretty sure. Well, we'll go back and you know, if you were to say, you know, one of the roles that you had earlier in your career was a springboard, what would you point to? Is the thing that kind of propelled you, because I'm sure there was one or two that just were the things that you stood on after that and we're able to kind of grow up, you know, and build on. Yeah, I mean that, no question. I mean I think the most pivotal, you know, career opportunity I got and spent many years that was a company called intro links, and I'm dating myself a bit now because I left them about twelve years ago, but internings was interesting for me because you know, I didn't come from a software background before I join introlling. So is in these traditional businesses with...

...some fairly old sales models, highly proven of work really well. But I had some of the adaptation to do to move into software, and that's already happened with introllings and interns just quickly. was really a sort of document manag from platform to house, secure content that they deployed into a whole load of use cases. They had a lone syndication product. All of me. Their success majorly was born out of creating this virtual dat room concept for companies that wanted to do diligence on on m a deals. And I joined is a bag carrying sales manager and got to learn, as I said, sort of the more sort of software CENTERC models and was really able to scale after a quite a few bumps on the road initially with the performance of the company, you know, through an issue from a quota of caring sales manager to all you running global sales and of course through the experiences of all the execution work and before strategy that's associated with it. You just get to learn a lot, of course. I mean we went from twelve million to a hundred seventy five minute. Over the nine years I was there we went from one city...

...to twenty five and twelve countries, and there's a law. Obviously that happens as you as you as you get taken through that and it's interesting, isn't it? You know, when you find people who are in doing for jobs today, most companies want to understand what your scale experiences and of course I got to achieve and and see that through those kind of gross satistics. And so that was no question that the most important pivolable job, pivil job. And you know, it was an outcome there too. They got sold twice and there was an IPO the end of it. So it was monetarily a wonderful outcome for me too. Nice, Nice, love it and and in you in your work today and advice. Well, when you talk to company, well, is there any common theme that you see? Let's just take maybe like a you know, you could go earlier, later stage. You know, nothing specific, but it's a really common theme that you see that the people are not paying attention to in the commercial side of thing. Yeah, it's funny, advised. Well, you we have these sort of three values or philosophies, if you will. One is a commitment to craftsmanship. The second one is, you know that, the wish and desire to help and develop people and then then, lastly, a focus on what matters in...

...each one of those within the ingredients of what they mean, are really important. I think to organization, but I think organizations, but I think the focus on what matters is really key. I was looking at somebody's sales plan the other day for two thousand and twenty two and it was a really comprehensive plan, very thorough. It was an excellent document, but what wasn't really called out for me was this is that, you know, I looked at their pipeline and they're likelihood of getting to their revenue numbering q one. I just didn't see it. And so, while I saw all these grand plans so what they wanted to achieve in the year, what I didn't see called at is what are the three things, whether it be in a pipeline coverage or a focus on conversion, wind rate type initiatives? And what is the polarizing drive across the company that you're going to, as the leader of the commercial era, get everybody aligned around in order to get us to our q one number. Because the point is this is that you can look at a fantastic plan and you can look at the execution of that plan during the course...

...of the year. If you can make your numbers, it doesn't sort of really matter, and of course all those plans have association, but it's really focusing on what matters. One of the three to five things that you're going to do that are going to allow you to get to your numbers, which, oddly, obviously is important, but will then allow you to see the full play out on the full results of executing all the wider parts of the plan. So I just it's a bit of a wood through the trees type point that I'm making, but you've got to get to those those areas and you've got to be really clear about what should be prioritized to get you to your number. Love it, love it. Well, look, you kind of went through a little bit of the luck and hard work, so you know, we'll skip that. I wonder you know, based on your work or just your history here, there any specific sific kind of tactics that you think are being overlooked, that people should employ and easy, something easy that they can employ even tomorrow. Yeah, I think in terms of tactics, I mean one of the things that I've, you know, observed, and this is a little Tangentle, but I think it has relevancies the way you're at as to how commercial leadership should think about their role and the importance of...

...the things that they should focus on. So with a o TB within on the bench, that is, within pavilion, I work with a lot of people are looking for jobs, whether they're in a job and they're searching or they're out of work. On the bench and they're obviously more agency seeking out new employment. And once they get through the interview process and sort of the tables turn a bit and really there then doing diligence on the company, one of the things that we get them really oriented around is understanding whether the numbers that they're going to inherit are achievable. And it's not that they shouldn't be stretched and they should be lofty goals, but are they achievable? And you know, sometimes you find companies or unwilling to share the information, which is obviously a sort of thing, a red flag, because then you don't know what you walk into. But I think also, in some cases we find that Cansas just need to be a bit more practive about asking for that information so that you can understand whether or not those numbers can be achieved and all the elements of sales capacity, what you want to see as an output from marketing that informs that sales capacity and, frankly, all the metrics as a...

...whole that give you a sense of where you're going to have to spend most of your focus and time in in in improving in order to get to those numbers. And of course, the thing is you know within pavilion we talk about this always that if you don't understand information like this, you know you're going to be the next person who's going to be out of a job in seventeen months. Right and today, of course, in a market where, you know, we're seeing these major, major valuations on companies. I mean it's not unusual to see fifty, sixty, a hundred times revenue on these valuations. You know the size of that cannon that is sitting on the desk of the head of sales these pointed at them. It's just getting bigger and bigger and bigger. And so just the broader point of understanding the achievability of what you're setting yourself up for a new job or even the job you are when you're looking at the goals for the upcoming year. They just really important versus hope and pray, and there are still executives above Zeros and head sales that are doing hope and praying well as to those numbers board, of course,...

...with input onto that, and it just, it just reduces the chances to success for that individual on the team at large. Yeah, I love that and it's so true and super relevant, especially for those that are that are looking for roles. So going you know, who are some of the folks that you find inspiration from? Give some shoutouts whether the uppercommers are folks that are are kind of people that you would recommend others to follow and see their content? Yeah, I mean content. I'll be part of it, but I think it's a little bit more broad for me. I mean the thing I love about pavilion. I know your question wasn't necessarily directed there, but I just gotten to meet so many people. Is that. Yeah, you get you get exposed to obviously a massive variety of people, but also people are different points in their career and you know, I just love all that. And so maybe a couple of answers. Sticking with pavilion people, I mean I really love what car lacey's doing. I mean's just a super human being. He's been a massive advocate, you know, early on for when was pavillain was really expanding in the Indian Indianapolis chapter and way more, and I just love his content. I love the fact that he's such a...

...humble guy. You know, I think I ms Linkedin profile. He talks about, you know, here, US, here to serve marketing. In there he runs marketing and less need, the company works for, recently got bought by seismic and he just is just a superhuman being that is just doing great things and he actually put a wonderful document in the knowledge hub grew with him pavilion on on a go to market outline. But sure to also think is really super which in a says two things. A what he's doing around stuff like that is really additive, but also the fact that he's so willing to openly share and offer people approaches that he could follow. They could follow that as similar to him. And then I would say, listen, there's a bunch of other people in Pavilion about. I work a lot with Kaitlyn McKie. I think she's a wonderful lady, and I know Carly Dell is doing special things relative to running marketing at pavilion. But maybe the final thing I'll quickly answer is that I got involved pretty early on in pavilion with an associate group before the associate program became sort of what it is today, and I was asked run a group around a bunch of different topics, around sort of go to market and overall commercial with a whole bunch of people that maybe a more of a sort of manager or director level, and I just absolutely...

...love that group and I got just as much out of the sessions as they did, learning maybe from some of the experiences I had. So you know, people like you, a Tory Moss over at greenhouse. He's running up some probably more by now. Will Evans and Matt de se are over electric, which is obviously a rocket ship. Andrew K Kale, who we all know is a CMO, over there. Mike Kaufman Hoff is at spring health, also working with another pavilion member, Mark Jacobs. I mean it's all those people doing really well Vale Velas it just works, and Olivia, handless at Procol, and I know the all doing really, really well, and so you know whether the putting out content or not. I just love to see how the progress is going for those guys and we keep in touch, although not, unfortunately, recently, facetoface. So that maybe that there's some good examples for you. There are all names that many, many folks in your chair have said before, which is just confirms that these are these are the people to be paying attention to. I love it all right, man. You know, all in all, sales go to market leadership. It's...

...cool, but going a restaurants is way cooler. Where should we be going to eat? What's your spot? Your tidbit for us? Well, I live, as I think you know, Brandon in the grammacy flatn era, and you know it is a candy store choice for certain. There's a lot around there. The one that I've been to recently that I most enjoyed is res Dora and if you meet a restorer, I have not yet, it's on the list for sure. Well, if you can get in, I mean this might be the time of year to do so. I think it's a like northern Italy, Lombardy style of Italian food, heavy emsass on Pasta. I mean it is it is a want of a restaurant. It's nothing grand. I mean it's one of those ones that sort of sort of Dan. It's a sort of a semibasement. It's not big back there, but the food is absolutely a magical and Pasta's the the meat is really good. They have a wonderful wine list. I'd highly recommend that. Love it, man. It's on the list and maybe I'm going to make you come with me. Yes, yes, incredible to chat with you, as always. For anyone listening that' that's trying to figure out what they need to be doing...

...with their business advis wells and incredible resource. You should chat with them. I'm sure that they're looking to pick up new customers. So that's my own personal shoutout for it for advice. Well, a great people and obviously get to interact with Fred and soak up all analogy. Has Meant so great to have you. Really look forward to hanging out. Yeah, absolutely brought up. Great talking to you. Have a super weekend. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you like to show, rate, review, apple podcast spot. If I ab sent it to friends, give me a subscribe. What's up? This episode was brought to you by s powered by AI in predictive analytics. Six sense helps you unite your entire revenue team with a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue program I had so much fun today. I hope you did too. Now get out and crush your numbers.

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