The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

Ep 110: Fighting Off Distractions w/ Parker Ashley, VP Americas at Darktrace

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 110: Fighting Off Distractions w/ Parker Ashley, VP Americas at Darktrace

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Thank God, it's monday. Welcome back tothe Pavilion podcast. This is your host Tom Alamo coming at you. This is withthe tips tricks and tactics that revenue leaders need to be successfulin their roles. Welcome back to another week, excited about the content today.Before we get to today's episode, Let's give a quick shout out to our sponsor.This episode is brought to you by drift. More than 50,000 businesses use driftto grow revenue and increase customer lifetime value faster drift, helpstheir customers aligned sales and marketing on a single platform todeliver a unified customer experience where people are free to have aconversation with the business at any time on their terms, learn more atdrift dot com. One quick word, you can find more about me. Um, Tom Alamo onlinked in Tommy, Tahoe on twitter and instagram and run the millennial salespodcasts outside of this show. That's really focused on helping young salespeople develop their careers for today's episode, I've got Parker Ashleysuper excited about this one. Parker is currently the VP of America's at DarkTrace has spent almost six years, they're coming up from an 80 role tosales manager to our VP two, VP and now VP of all of America's and so he'staken kind of the long road, the in tech. It's, it's hard, it's tough tosay that it's, it's a unusual path to be there five or six years at a company.It's really paid off for him. So we talk about his journey, we talk abouthis former lives a little bit, starting as a cut co sales rep, getting intotech beads, our fiend business apps, a few other roles before landing at DarkTrace and really talk about his journey and how he's grown as a leader. So Ithink you're really going to enjoy this episode without further ado, let's justget straight to me and Parker. All right, Parker Ashley hailing down inAustin texas. Good morning man. How are you? Hey, good morning tom. I'm good.I'm good. How are you? I'm doing well. You've got, I've just got a call it out.You've got an outstanding Zoom background. A top 5% zoom background.I've seen the last 18 months man. I appreciate that. And that's coming fromsomebody who's seen it quite a few. So thank you. Put some work into thisearlier on. I figured I'd be doing zoom calls more often than not. So I wantedto have something pleasant for people to look at. I'm not much of a botanistthough, so as long as they keep these plants alive, then we'll be okay. Yeah.There you go. There you go. Um I love it, man. I love it. So you're down inAustin? How long have you been in Austin for? It's a new move for me. SoI'm yet another California moving to Austin. So I've been here since aboutFebruary. So pretty new. But loving it so far, it's been a great change butbeen in California the last 25 years so it's nice to it's nice to switch it up.Was this a like a covid we gotta get...

...out of here type of move or you've beenthinking about it for a while? I think I've been thinking about it for a while.You know I was bouncing back from I grew up in the Bay Area. I was born inum down south and south Carolina families from Georgia but spent most ofmy childhood in the Bay Area and then I bounced back between L. A. And sanFrancisco like four times. And by the last one I was like okay yeah I couldonly make this move so many times and it's it's not going to change much. I Ifeel like it's the opportunity is now too to change scenery trying tobackground new state whole thing. So it was a bit of that. I also you knowstart my new my new role is VP of the Americas and needed to be a bit morecentrally times owned both so I could get some hours back with the U. K. Andand not be working too late or too early on either side. So it was kind ofa strategic move and a fun one as well. Yeah. That's awesome. Well before weget to all the great things that you're doing now I have to start with where weare tied forever as cut co sales reps. See that was was that your first salesjob? Yeah, it was my first true sales job and I saw that in your backgroundas well. I was hoping you'd bring it up. And that was my first true sales jobman. Did it in high school and did that for probably five or six months. Ican't remember how long but right before going to college. And I mean Icredit that experience with teaching me at least a lot of the foundations ofsoft skills that I needed for my sales career. I mean it was I mean I can'ttake that experience back for anything. It was fantastic. So how long do you doit? I did it for one summer in college and uh I was just thinking about thisthe other day, I played tennis in college and so for the first year twoin in the summer I would teach camp and I was kind of like talking myself intomaybe being like a tennis coach and like that's many my job after schooland not that there's anything wrong with that, but I hurt my shoulder onesummer and then found this flyer ended up getting into cut co sales and fromthen I was like, oh, I can do this as a job. You know, like this is a, I didn'teven really get that sales was even a thing until I had that summerexperience. So it totally changed my life. Yeah, 100%. I mean there'snothing quite like the gauntlet of door to door effectively, door to door salesand you know, hats off to vector marketing. Mean their training isreally top notch and it was a great program and I ended up making a littlebit of cash, which it was, it was really cool to see like some of the,you know, your time, not just time for money, but results for money kind ofthing. And I think that was a paradigm shift for me, even when I was goingdown the medical school route, always would lean back into that experience isokay, well, I know that's at least something I enjoyed and was decent at.So I can always take it back to the...

...sales route. So good to see thatthere's another vector market are out there being successful in sales world.There's a, I've interviewed a few 100 sales leaders at this point, it'ssuccessful salespeople and I don't know the percent, but there's a pretty solidpercentage that you see the vector marketing at the very bottom of theirlengthen as the first job. And it's, it's really not a surprise to me, likeyou, if you can swing that, you can swing pretty much as any other type ofsales job. I think it's just a great way to cut your teeth. A great, great.So you were on the medical school path and now you're the VP of sales at atech company. So like, where did that, where did that decision come from todrop, you know, kind of the medical route and go into sales and go intobusiness. That's a great question. It was all I want to do. B a B a surgeonsince I was like 16. And I went, you know, I went yard man, I I took the Mcat, I applied to schools, I interviewed at schools. I was acceptedinto one. Wait listed to most, but accepted into one. But you know, I'llbe honest by that in order to really be successful, I think in anything butespecially in medicine with how the industry is changing, you really haveto have a certain level of passion for it. And while I was very passionate thebeginning, the more exposure I had to that industry, the less passionate Ibecame And um it came down to the point of taking out a big loan and dedicating10 years of my life with an uncertain outcome of whether or not I'd besatisfied with the job and with the role and everything like that. You know,I decided that if, unless I was 100% in, I shouldn't take a spot for somebodywho is and who needs that opportunity. And so I backed away from that much tomy parents chagrin, but yeah-backed away. And then, and at the time when Iwas interviewing I was working for a small start up in san Francisco calledbusiness apps was run by a friend and a mentor of mine. Andrew Gwozdecky,you've probably seen him around on on linkedin or or podcast, he's prettyprevalent, but it was run by him at the time and I feel my buddies work thereand I was working as an SDR, I do pretty well, you know, enjoying it, butit was really just kind of one of those placeholders for me while I apply formed school, my parents like get a job man. So while I did that, I it wasaround that time that I started thinking about pivoting and I knew thatif I did make a pivot I need to really be all in on whatever it is I want todo similar to how I've been, so all in on on becoming a doctor for the lastseveral years. And to be honest, the only thing I liked just as much or morethan medicine was technology. And the only thing I knew I was good at, I knewit wasn't engineering. I spent some time in a lab at USC and it washorrible at it doing like biomechanics and stuff like that, but I knew itwasn't engineering. The only thing I knew I was good at because of thingslike cut Co two sales and I was already...

...doing it my current job. So I was like,okay, this could be something I could lean into, but I've got to get moreserious about it and that's kind of the path I've been on ever since. Yeah. Andwhen, when you say be more serious about it, like what did you, what didyou do to become successful? Right. Like oftentimes people like maybe youworked with a mentor or you start reading sales books or I don't know ifthere's some sort of training you took, but I'm just curious like once youdecided that was the path, you just strike me as someone that that's astudent of the game and always getting better. So I'm just curious what you'veleaned into to do that. It was exactly that, but it was first and foremostputting myself in a position to win and I think it was joining, it was findinga company that could take me to that next level in my sales career andbusiness actually fantastic just from a culture and a camaraderie perspectiveand it taught me to fundamentals and and all that stuff. But I knew I neededto kind of go upmarket. I knew I needed to get a more enterprise levelexperience. Like I knew based on the little bit, I knew at the time I atleast knew that much, at least knew I needed to kind of grass that experienceand put myself and give myself the opportunity to win. So that was thefirst bit and the second, it is exactly as you mentioned, it's going all inbuying reading as much as I could find on on sales and methodology, reallyfinding some mentors, finding some coaches, just learning and absorbing asmuch as I could, trying and failing as much as I could when I joined mycurrent from Dark Trace, you know, we're still startup, I was an earlyemployee there, it was a lot more developed than where I was from like atechnology perspective, but the sales or was pretty underdeveloped and so youknow I had one mentor really who was a senior a and then became a directorthere. But everything else I had to learn on my own, there is no structure.There was little in the way of a playbook. There wasn't a methodologywere subscribing to, there's none of that. So I really had to be proactivein learning as much of that on my own as I could in order to be successful.And it took me some time to be honest, to do it on your own, which speaks tothe power we could turn a good program. But eventually I figured it out.Absolutely. And it's not every day that you see, you know, a VP of sales thathas been in a company almost six years, right? Like the stat stat is like superPrevalent in most people's minds that the average tenure is what like 15months or something like that. So to see someone that's continued to climb,get promotions, stay at one place for, for almost six years. Like I'm curiouswhat that's all about. Most people don't, you know, I can't say thatthey've done something like that. You know, it's usually a year or two andand they're on to the next mission. So I'm just curious what it is about darktrace that has kept you there so long. Yeah, man. I mean it's a bit of a tabooin the technology industry. I think,...

...you know, you become a lifer after likefour years and you know, I, I definitely, I definitely understandthat right? I think there's merit in having a wealth of differentexperiences and testing your skills in different places in different scenarios.And I think there's a lot of value in that. I also think a lot of youngerpeople, there are folks earlier in their career rather can rob themselvesof potential growth and experienced by moving too early and too fast, becausethen, you know, a lot of growing with the company's one, you've got to findthe right company and there's a lot of luck and there's a lot of assetsinvolved. But the second one is, I think to me is, You know, I recognizethat man, if you could just outlast a lot of people, there's so much growthopportunity, you know, relationships take a long time to build, becomingpart of that kind of inner circle takes a long time and you're not going to dothat if you're starting over every 18-24 months. And for me that that wasan obvious formula, that as long as I could find success in whatever I wasdoing, as long as I saw and experienced growth and wherever I was, and it wasconsistent then it made very little sense to leave, right? Unless there wassomething incredibly compelling or took me to another level somewhere else. Butin terms of dark tracing my stay there, I mean they've really mastered that inmy experience in my opinion, in terms of always keeping somebody on theirtoes, always presenting a new challenge, They almost embrace my A. D. H. D alittle bit, never let me get bored. You know, the moment I I start to plateauin terms of the things that I'm learning in one position, they'll throwa new challenge onto my plate for better or worse, right? So when I wasuh when I was a rep, it was Habia, Team lead and management. You know, thestandard stuff, a team lead, managed a small team, do a little bit playercoach, fine. And then it was okay now more of a director role, but you know,we're still startups to do some player coach. And then it was pure Director ofpure management and build a team. And then I got okay at that. And then theysaid, OK, now go open a new territories like, okay, that's that's a newchallenge. That's interesting. I could do that for sure and it just kind of onit went and it really made little sense to like, well do I want to go startthis whole process over somewhere else? And yes, I would love to kind of gain amore rounded experience and learn to sell different technologies and underdifferent management and things like that. And eventually that will be mypath. But I've gotten to become exposed to so many things so fast by juststaying the course. And I was very fortunate working for an organizationthat was on such a growth trajectory and had so many opportunities and a lotof people may not have that their organization, you've got to becognizant of that. But I did, I was, I was able to balance learning andearning pretty well throughout the last several years and I think that's been areason that I have been a lifer at my current Oregon I guess. Well, I thinkthere's something that a lot of folks...

...can probably glean from this, right? Ifthey are in that habit of Switching jobs, say every 18 months. So when youfind yourself plateau going right in some way or another, who starts thatconversation right? Has that been your leadership that says, Hey Parker? Youknow, we've noticed you've really started just kind of crush it at thiscurrent role and maybe you're getting a little plateau, you're a littlecomplacent or you kind of max out your potential at this job, here's this newthing to try, Or do you say, hey, I'm kind of feeling internally like I'mlosing the drive a little bit, I'm plateau going, I need a challenge. Like,can we put something else on my plate? How does that conversation usually go?I think that's a that's a great question, You know, I think there's acouple of views to this, because I've been in both situations, I've been insituations where being overeager can actually hurt your chances of growthbecause it almost comes off as ungrateful or impatient. And I've seenit number of times where somebody who, you know, has one win or two wins,they're like, I want a promotion now and it's like, well that's not theright timing forward or whatever the case may be, but it's somebody kind of,the people kind of keep their head down and have that consistent when, but theymake sure people know about their winds of course, and they're, you know,they're creating a an audience, an alignment within the executive group orwhatever, but they're constantly winning and they're just doing itbecause that's their job. Those people tend to come out ahead, but the otherside of camp is, you know, I think in terms of sensing your plateau, if yousense that you're no longer growing and being challenged, you're the only onethat's going to know that most likely, like, sure there's somebody who,there's great leaders out there who could see like, okay, this person needsto be challenged more. Like, they're too far in their comfort zone to seeoutside of it, and we're going to pull them out of it, and that that doesexist. But a lot of times you're gonna know more so where those boundaries mayor may not be at least when you feel a plateau coming. And I think aphilosophy for me has always been okay. So once I feel pretty comfortably thatI've mastered close to mastered the current role I'm in or the current taskthat I'm doing, you know, just start working on the next thing. You know,obviously don't don't drop any of the duties and responsibilities that youhave and that you've agreed to an assigned to those are yours, but youalmost have to start thinking to the job you want and and performing andacting within the job you want. And you see this a lot of advice where peopleare like, you know, you don't have to be you know, be promoted to aleadership position to be a leader, you could be a leaders and I eat withinyour team, you just have to go out of your way and coach people and thingslike that and leadership will notice that kind of stuff. I think very muchso the rest of the organization, the team will notice things like that. Andso for me it's it's been a combination. You know, I think a dark trace done agreat job and identifying when I'm I'm...

...getting a little bit restless or whenthere's an opportunity around that they think I'll be a good fit for they reachout. But it's also been me taking on another project that I didn'tnecessarily have to, but I was trying to constantly challenge myself into newthings. And an example of this was before I was promoted my current role,which is kind of overseeing the commercial growth and strategy for allof the Americas. I was a regional vice president in the southwest. I wasoverseeing largely just the commercial, some of the operations because I'vebuilt that office out. But one of the things that led to this new role was Istarted looking at trends across the business. I started looking at thingsthat were concerning not just me, but other people, executives and otherwiseother regional BPS. And I started working to identify and use data to tryto find, you know, what those trends could be associated towards. Like whatwas the cause of some of this negative outcome and where can we makeimprovements and experiment to try to fix those things? And uh you know, I'mtrying to be very vague because I don't want to share too much. But effectivelyI was able to use, I went and use data and experimented to solve one of thekey problem which was one of the challenges that we had was kind ofmoving up market as an average rather than kind of slowly trickling back downmarket. And I was able to use data to kind of solve one of the key areas thatwas leading to that movement down market and make a trend back in theright direction, which is the direction the business wanted to go. I was ableto support it with data, I was able to find it using data and that was wayoutside of my role. Like I wasn't in sales office, I barely I didn't have asales office person under me or anything like that. I just kind of didit on my own and then I was fortunate to have somebody in sales has helped meout with some of the data in the back and then I presented that to managementand they were like, great, you should you should try to do this more broadly.And so it was kind of working in that role that you want and and finding yournext opportunity by acting in it I think. Yeah. And how much time, likewould you say like what was your split? Right? So you get to the point whereyou feel like you've mastered the current role or close to it, right? Andyou see this opportunity and it sounds like you did that as a rep and you'vedone that as a leader as well and you find this opportunity that you can makea bigger impact. And you also probably understand that this is going to becatapult your career forward, right? If done well. What's the percentage oftime split that you spend on like the current role versus like this newopportunity? Oh, I mean it's it's like 80, 20. It's like Pareto principle kindof thing, you know? Um but it's a pretty a marginal split right? Themajority of my time and still spent doing my day to day role. But then Imaybe it's like, you know, you may take on side projects, I think google stilllet their employees do similar thing, which is really smart because you neverknow what somebody is going to be able to think about when you have all thesecollective brains working together with different experiences. So I think it'sstill a majority of my time spent doing...

...my current role too small bit of mytime doing other things. But that ratio probably changes the longer I am inthat role because you optimize a lot of processes, you get a lot better. LikeWhen I get into a new role, like 110% of my time is spent trying to figureout how to do that job until I start clicking and I start makingrealizations and then I okay I could do the same work in less time and then youoptimize and you get systems in place and then suddenly, you know, you canget eight hours worth of work done and four and so on and so forth. And Ithink so the ratio changes the more mastery you gain at your existing role,you could have free up more time to do other things. Yeah, absolutely. So onetopic I wanted to talk about you brought up your 80 HD earlier and uh Isaw one of your posts on it that I really liked and thought this would behelpful conversation to have. And and your post was something to the extentof like saying that you have A. D. H. D. And you know that you get distractedpretty frequently but yet you've also really excelled in all these differentthings we're talking about. And just like some of the tips that or things orhabits that you have that kind of help you stay focused. So I'd love a fewshared a few thoughts on that. Yeah definitely. I mean it's still I'mplaying with a stress ball right now and I don't know if you can stay on thecamera. I'm like constantly touching stuff like moving stuff around. Youknow it helps to a point I guess but it's still very much there. Um So Ithink focus has been really hard and I don't I'm not one you know I don't liketaking like medication to help with that. It's just not my thing, you know,it's totally okay if that's your thing or some people need it to solve theirlike imbalances or whatever for me, I just always tried to stay more naturalso, you know, taking like Adderall or Ritalin or something that was just, itwas never an option for me. So I had to find other ways to kind of manage,manage my mentality and there's a lot of stuff like, you know, meditation andthose kind of mental focus and other exercises that I think are helpful foreverybody, no matter what I mean, It's just so good to get tuned with yourselfand understand your own mind and emotions and stuff like that. I thinkthat's really helpful. But then there's like the actual tactical tips. So doingthings like time blocking. I used to keep a like a, Like a small clock on mydesk and I put 30 minutes down and I'm like, okay, I'm only doing this onetask for 30 minutes and that's it. Until that time is up. I'm only focusedon this shutting down email. My personal phone, much to the frustrationof my parents and friends, doesn't have like sound notifications on it. So ifsomebody calls me, if my phone is on silent calls tax etcetera, I just getthe pop up. I don't get any sounds or...

...anything like that to pull me away anddistract me. So like little things like that have always been really helpful.And then one of my favorites is uh, is like kind of this like parking lotapproach where you, you know, I just have a lot of random thoughtsthroughout the day And if you're not careful, you know, I can let that justtake me away for like 30 minutes or an hour and I'm down this like Internetand YouTube rabbit hole like researching this one little stupidthought I had. So I have this kind of parking lot of ideas that keep anotebook or notes on my phone and I'll just write it down. I'll just have thisparking lot, just random thoughts to pop in my head and I'll just write itdown and I'll revisit it later in the day. And if it was really something Iwant to explore, I can't because there's some good thoughts that pop inmy head. But I know if I let myself be taken by that thought for too long, itwill completely distract from what I'm doing. So I just put them down, savingfor later and then try to revisit it in its own time block. So little thingslike that are really helpful for me. But for those who spent enough timewith me, they have known that it hasn't necessarily solved My 80 HD but it hashelped me stay productive. Yeah. And on a similar threat, we were talkingbefore we started recording about kind of like over filling your plate withtasks and responsibilities and obligations you mentioned as of late,you have kind of tried to start shrinking that back a little bit to bemore focused. Could you talk a little bit about how you do that if it's a waythat you say no to people, if it's maybe it's time blocking. Like youmentioned as being more productive at certain hours of the day that allow youto do that and focus. I'm curious what actions you've taken to kind of shrinksome of your tasks back. Yeah, I think the biggest one is your first point,which is being willing and able to say no. And I saw a post this morningactually, I can't remember who posted it, but apologies if it was you andyou're listening. Uh but I saw a post that was talked about being protectiveof your time, how it's the most critical asset and how this person, Ithink reduced their work week from 5-4, 4 days and they saw zero differentproductivity and they start cutting all these other projects out, delegating.And I think that's all well and good. You know, I think saying no to thingsthat aren't aligned with your goals and your missions is something thateverybody needs to learn to do. And it's really tempting, especially in acareer when earlier career whatever just say yes to everything. Andsometimes it's helpful right? If you're early in your career and your missionis to get ahead, then yeah, maybe you just want to volunteer for a bunch ofstuff until you find your group. But eventually you kind of know whereyou're trying to go and you could very easily identify. Okay, does thiswebinar really benefit me in any way? Like does this move me toward my goal?Okay. No. Then why am I doing it? Why am I spending time working on this? Andit's distracting me from other things. Right? So saying no is the first oneand I had a ton of like mastermind...

...groups and all these other things thatI was participating in and just dipping my toe in way too many different waters.And I had to start cutting those back saying, is this really align with mygoal? Is this really mission driven or oriented? And if not then cut it out,it doesn't matter like why am I focusing on it? It's just a distraction.I'm not going to put enough energy into that one thing to make it worthwhileand it's sucking energy away from the things that are moving towards thatmission. So just saying no to those projects, those little side tasks,those things that aren't distracted, I think is the biggest one for me, morethan almost anything else in terms of cutting down on time. The secondbiggest one is still time blocking because people have access to mycalendar and I'll notice stuff just kind of populates on it if I'm not verycareful. So in the morning I block out like a two hour chunk of time in theafternoon, I blocked at a two hour chunk of time and those are just nomatter what those times for me to focus on whatever project that I need tofocus on, Those are always blocked a recursive every day in my calendar. Itdoesn't break except for extreme exceptions. But I think I think thosetwo things is, is what helped me try to stay focused and try to make sure myplate doesn't get too full because it's happened before and it is absolutelymiserable to try to juggle all of those plates and you just feel like you'removing backwards not making any meaningful progress when you're tryingto do too much. Yeah, it's super timely because I've been over my recentvacation for the listeners. This is the first conversation I've had with ahuman in a work capacity coming back from vacation. So hopefully I'm hangingin there. But I've been reading free to focus by Michael. Hi it. I don't knowif you've read that or are familiar with it, but it came as a I think I sawdrift ceo David cancel talk about a while ago and picked it up and abouthalfway through. And it's talking a lot about this type of stuff essentiallyhow to get more done in less time. And a lot of it is about cutting things out,automating it, delegating it time blocks, things like that. I love it. Ihave not read it but it's now in my kindle cart. So thank you for thatrecommendation. But I assume it's similar to the principles of like thefour hour workweek and stuff like that. Which which you know, contrary topopular belief, isn't about working four hours a week. It's aboutoptimizing your time so that you have more dedicated focus toward the thingsthat really matter and move the needle. So it's interesting. Thank you for thatrecommendation. Yeah, absolutely. Just on the topic of of learning and readingand things like that. Any books or resources that have either helped you alot throughout your career or that you mentioned to people to to read whetherit's sales or leadership or psychology or anything like any topic really isfair game. Yeah. Um you know, I'm sitting next to one of my bookshelveshere and I love reading so I could kind of go down this path for a while. Iused to when I was and scr was reading...

...about a book a week which turned out tobe a bit bit overwhelming. So I've cut that back, but there's a few books thatI love and it changes, that list changes constantly. But I think, youknow, if I'm going to talk about more career growth stuff, one book that I'veread recently that has been phenomenal, is seeing the big picture by KevinCooper and if you're an aspiring executive or you want to grow yourbusiness career outside of maybe just the sales function or whatever the caseis, It's really important that you understand the bigger picture conceptsaround business. And this was like one of the best books I've read for that interms of just really putting that perspective. Seeing the big picture byKevin Cope is great. Some of my all time favorites like 48 laws of power. Ilove that book. I recently reread Marcus Aurelius meditations, which is afantastic, if you're big on kind of mentality, you know, he's an originalstoic philosopher, so fantastic, kind of meditative book stuff. But I thinkthose are kind of some of my favorites right now, but you know, ask me againin three months, that list will change. Yeah, I love it. I love it. Those areboth great, great recommendations. I have not read the first one, seeing theBig picture, I've never heard of it before, but I haven't noted down andwe'll check it out. So I appreciate the book recommendation. Of course. So,last question for you before we kind of wrap things up. Obviously we're talkingon the Pavilion podcast, huge emphasis of the group is, you know, networkingand helping other people out and trying to grow your career by helping others.So I'm just curious whether it's Pavilion related or not. Just yournumber one networking tip that you have for people that are trying to growtheir career. Oh man. And this is something I'm still figuring out everyday. I think a couple of things, I don't know if I could distill it downto one, but I think what's really important is that you find a group likePavilion or another mastermind type of group with like minded people trying toreceive similar goals. You just want to be in the room. It's kind of like thefive people you spend the most time with is, you know, who you will likelybecome sort of thing if you're not getting, if you're not having theconversations you want your current group. It's so easy now, especiallywith technology, go out and find a group like that where you couldimmediately have conversations with like minded people. So that's that's mynumber one. I've done that in my investing career. I've done that mysales career. I think that if I'm going to pick a number one, that's it. Theother one is like, you know, for me, I've found tremendous value and workingto build a bit of a brand online and I'm no master at this by any means, butI've using like things like linkedin to try to create a voice and try to use itto genuinely connect with people, one of my favorite things to do. And I'vebeen really bad about it the last week because we've been slammed, offendedyear and stuff. But every morning I would try to go through my connectionson linkedin, I'd send a video out to somebody Brandon moore who had chatwith in the past, just, you know, kind of thanking them for being part of mynetwork and however, we met whatever...

...experience we had, you know, kind ofjust gratitude for having them in my network, but more importantly sendingthem a bit of positivity in the morning, just letting them know that justchanging their day up, you know, getting something else out there, likedoing things like that, is reminding yourself that at the end of the daywe're all we're all people, we're all human, and it helps to have a littlebit of a human touch and human outreach every now and then, you know, just makethe outreach, and I know, you know, tom you reached out to Mark Cuban way backwhen when you had a tough quarter, I saw that post, and I thought that wasawesome. You know, just make the outreach, you know, if you want to talkto somebody, if you want to meet somebody, just do it. I think that'sgoing to be really important, and um, you know, don't make it about anyagenda, just reach out. If you have a question, people love to help peopleask the question, I'm sure somebody will be willing to help you. Andsimilarly, if anybody ever wants to reach out to me, please do. I lovechatting with people and getting all calls and I don't know a lot yet, butif I can help you in some way, I absolutely love to. Yeah, that'sawesome. I love that video tip, I'm going to have to steal that and uhdouble down on the positivity that's out there. Yes, sir, I love it. I loveit. We could all use a bit more in our lives. Yeah, for sure. Well, Parker, Iappreciate you coming on. If anyone has questions for you about anything thatwe talked about, they want to meet up, they want to get a video from you onlinkedin, what's the best place to catch up with you? Yeah, man, umdefinitely linked in. Just reach out. You can find me on their Alternatively,I, I have a website with like account li link if you're really so inclined tobook time, I probably should share that though because who knows what kind ofcalendars invite somebody beginning soon, but Lincoln is probably thenumber one. You reach out to shoot me a message and happy to connect awesome.Parker. I appreciate your time, man, this is great. Yeah, thank you Tom Iappreciate you having me on. It's good to catch up. All right, thanks forchecking out that episode. Hope you enjoyed it while you were probablymultitasking, doing something else. Let's give a quick shout out to oursponsor. This episode again was brought to you by drift. The new way businessesby from businesses. You can learn more and get the conversation started atdrift dot com. I'll be back to you next monday if you're anxious and want tochat or connect with me. In the meantime, I'm tom Alamo on linked inTommy Tahoe, on twitter and instagram and I'm posting every single day aboutsales and growth mindset. So not further. Do make it a great week. Talkto you next monday. Say something. Mhm.

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