The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 9 months ago

Ep 175: Fighting Off Distractions w/ Parker Ashley, VP Americas at Darktrace (Best of 2021)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 175: Fighting Off Distractions w/ Parker Ashley, VP Americas at Darktrace (Best of 2021)

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Alright, everybody, welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. This is the podcast where revenue leaders come to learn the tips, the tricks of tactics that they need to be successful in their roles. I'm your host. Thank God it's Monday. It's Tommy Tahoe. Alamo. Um, definitely hit me up on LinkedIn. Let me know what you thought of this episode. I work over at Gong. Um, we are doing a throwback for the last few weeks of the holidays of 2021 some of our top episodes. This was the number as of today, the number one downloaded episode of all of 2021 where I talked to the VP of sales over a dark trace. Parker Ashley. And we got into everything from his career path. What's made him successful. How to take on more as a leader, get into a little bit of personal finance. It's an amazing episode. I really hope you enjoy it. All right. This episode of the Pavilion podcast is brought to you by Sandoz. So Sandoz So the leading sending platform is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey. By connecting digital and physical strategies, companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than ever before. Now let's get into the show. All right. Parker. Ashley hailing down in Austin, Texas. Good morning, man. How are you? Hey. Good morning. Time. I'm good. I'm good. How are you? I'm doing well. You've got I just got a call it out. You've got an outstanding Zoom background. A top 5% zoom background I've seen the last 18 months, man. I appreciate that. And that's coming from somebody who's seen it. Quite a few. So thank you. Put some work into this. Earlier on, I figured I'd be doing zoom calls more often than not, so I wanted to have something pleasant for people to look at. I'm not much of a botanist, though. So as long as they keep these plants alive, then, uh, we'll be okay. Yeah. There you go. There you go. Um, I love it, man. I love it. So you're down in Austin. How long have you been in Austin for? It's a new move for me. So I'm yet another California moving to Austin. So I've been here since about February. So pretty new but loving it. So far, it's been a great change, but been in California the last 25 years, so it's nice to it's nice to switch it up. Was this a like a covid? We got a get out of here type of move or you've been thinking about it for a while. I think. I've been thinking about it for a while, you know, I was bouncing back from where I grew up in the Bay Area. I was born in down South and South Carolina families from Georgia, but spent most of my childhood in the Bay Area. And then I bounced back between LA and San Francisco, like four times. And by the last one, I was like Okay, yeah, I could only make this move so many times and it's it's not going to change much. I I feel like it's the opportunity is now, too, to change scenery, trying to background New State whole thing. So it...

...was a bit of that. I also, you know, start my new my new role as VP of the Americas and needed to be a bit more centrally times owned both. So I could get some hours back with the U. K and and not be working too late or too early on either side. So it was kind of a strategic move and a fun one as well. Yeah, that's awesome. Well, before we get to all the great things that you're doing now I have to start with where we are tied forever as cut co sales reps. I see. That was Was that your first sales job? Yeah, it was my first true sales job, and I saw that in your background as well. I was hoping you'd bring it up, and that was my first true sales job. Man did it in high school and did that for probably five or six months. I can't remember how long, but right before going to college. And I mean, I credit that experience with teaching me at least a lot of the foundations of soft skills that I needed for my sales career. I mean, it was I mean, I can't take that experience back for anything. It was fantastic. So how long do you do it? I did it for one summer in college, and, uh, I was just thinking about this the other day. I played tennis in college, and so for the first year, two in in the summer, I would teach camp. And I was kind of like talking myself into maybe being like a tennis coach and like, that's maybe my job after school and not that there's anything wrong with that. But I hurt my shoulder one summer and then found this flyer ended up getting into cut co sales. And from then I was like, Oh, I can do this as a job. You know, like this is a I didn't even really get that. Sales was even a thing until I had that summer experience. So it totally changed my life. Yeah, 100%. I mean, there's nothing quite like the gauntlet of door to door effectively door to door sales. And, you know, hats off to vector marketing mean their training is really top notch. And it was a great program and I ended up making a little bit of cash, which it was. It was really cool to see, like some of the you know your time, not just time for money, but results for money kind of thing. And I think that was a paradigm shift for me, even when I was going down the medical school route always would lean back into that experience is okay, well, I know that's at least something I enjoyed and was decent at, so I can always take it back to the sales route. So good to see that there's another vector market are out there being successful in Sales world. There's a you know, I've interviewed a few 100 sales leaders at this point. It's successful salespeople, and I don't know the percent, but there's a pretty solid percentage that you see the vector marketing at the very bottom of their LinkedIn as the first job. And it's it's really not a surprise to me like you. If you can swing that you can swing pretty much as any other type of sales job. I think it's just a great way to cut your teeth a great great. So...

...you were on the medical school path, and now you're the VP of sales at a tech company. So, like, where did that? Where did that decision come from? To drop, you know, kind of the medical route and go into sales and go into business. That's a great question. It was all I want to do. B A b a surgeon since I was, like, 16, and I went, you know, I went yard man, I I took the M cat. I applied to schools I interviewed at schools. I was accepted into one wait, listed to most but accepted into one. But, you know, I'll be honest by that in order to really be successful. I think in anything but especially in medicine with how the industry is changing, you really have to have a certain level of passion for it. And while I was very passionate the beginning, the more exposure I had to that industry, the less passionate I became. And, um, it came down to the point of taking out a big loan and dedicating 10 years of my life with an uncertain outcome of whether or not I'd be satisfied with the job and with the role and everything like that. You know, I decided that unless I was 100% in, I shouldn't take a spot for somebody who is and who needs that opportunity. And so I backed away from that much to my parents' chagrin, but yeah, backed away. And then and at the time when I was interviewing, I was working for a small startup in San Francisco called Business Apps was run by a friend and a mentor of mine. Andrew Gwozdecky. You've probably seen him around on on LinkedIn. Our podcast is pretty prevalent, but I just ran by him at the time. And I feel my buddies worked there and I was working as an SDR. I do pretty well, you know, enjoying it. But it was really just kind of one of those placeholders for me while I applied from at school. My parents get a job, man. So while I did that, I It was around that time that I started thinking about pivoting. And I knew that if I did make a pivot, I need to really be all in on whatever it is I want to do, similar to how I've been so all in on on becoming a doctor for the last several years. And to be honest, the only thing I liked just as much or more than medicine was technology. And the only thing I knew I was good at I knew it wasn't engineering. I spent some time in the lab at USC and it was horrible at it, doing like biomechanics and stuff like that. But I knew it wasn't engineering. The only thing I knew I was good at because of things like cut Co two sales and I was already doing it my current job. So I was like, Okay, this could be something I could lean into. But I've got to get more serious about it. And that's kind of the path I've been on ever since. Yeah, and when When you say, be more serious about it, like what did you What did you do to become successful, right? Like oftentimes people like, Maybe it was you worked with a mentor or you start reading sales books or I don't know if there's some sort of training you took, but I'm just curious, like once he decided that was the path You just strike me as someone that that's a student of the game and always getting better. So I'm just curious what you've...

...leaned into to do that it was exactly that, but it was first and foremost, putting myself in a position to win and I think it was joining. It was finding a company that could take me to that next level and my sales career and business was fantastic, just from a culture and camaraderie perspective. And it taught me the fundamentals and and all that stuff. But I knew I needed to kind of go up market. I knew I needed to get a more enterprise level experience like I knew, based on the little bit. I knew at the time I at least knew that much at least knew I needed to kind of grasp that experience and put myself in a give myself the opportunity to win. So that was the first bit. And the second it is exactly as you mentioned. It's going all in buying reading as much as I could find on on sales and methodology, really finding some mentors, finding some coaches, just learning and absorbing as much as I could, trying and failing as much as I could when I joined my current from Dark Trace. You know, we're still startup. I was, you know, an early employee there. It was a lot more developed than where I was from. Like a technology perspective but the sales or was pretty underdeveloped. And so, you know, I had one mentor, really, who was a senior a and then became a director there. But everything else I had to learn on my own. There is no structure. There was little in the way of a playbook. There wasn't a methodology were subscribing to. There's none of that. So I really had to be proactive in learning as much of that on my own as I could in order to be successful. And it took me some time to be honest, to do it on your own, which speaks to the power we could turn a good program. But eventually I figured it out. Yeah, absolutely. And it's not every day that you see, you know, a VP of sales that has been in a company almost six years, right? Like The stat stat is like super prevalent in most people's minds that the average tenure is what, like 15 months or something like that. So to see someone that's continued to climb, get promotions, stay at one place for for almost six years like I'm curious what that's all about, most people don't you know. I can't say that they've done something like that. You know, it's usually a year or two and and they're onto the next mission. So I'm just curious what it is about dark trace that has kept you there so long. Yeah, man. I mean, it's a bit of a taboo in the technology industry. I think, you know, you become a lifer after, like, four years. And, you know, I I definitely I definitely understand that, right. I think there's merit in having a wealth of different experiences and testing your skills in different places in different scenarios, and I think there's a lot of value in that. I also think a lot of younger people, our folks earlier in their career rather can rob themselves of potential growth and experience by moving too early and too fast, because then you know a lot of growing with the company's one.

You've got to find the right company and there's a lot of luck and there's a lot of that stuff involved. But the second one is, I think to me is, You know, I recognize that man. If you could just outlast a lot of people, there's so much growth opportunity. You know, relationships take a long time to build. Becoming part of that kind of inner circle takes a long time. And you're not going to do that if you're starting over every 18-24 months. And for me that that was an obvious formula, that as long as I could find success in whatever I was doing, as long as I saw and experienced growth and wherever I was and it was consistent, then it made very little sense to leave, right, unless there was something incredibly compelling or took me to another level somewhere else. But in terms of dark traces might have stayed there. I mean, they've really mastered that in my experience, in my opinion, in terms of always keeping somebody on their toes, always presenting a new challenge, they almost embrace my 80 HD a little bit. Never let me get bored. You know, the moment I I start to plateau in terms of the things that I'm learning in one position, they'll throw a new challenge onto my plate, for better or worse. Right? So when I was a when I was a rep, it was habia team lead and manage the standard stuff. The team lead managed a small team, do a little bit player coach. Fine. And then it was okay, now more of a director role. But, you know, we're still startups to do some player, coach, and then it was pure director of pure management and build a team. And then I I got okay at that. And then they said, Okay, now go open a new territories like Okay, that's that's a new challenge. That's interesting. I could do that for sure, and it just kind of on it went and it really made little sense to like, Well, do I want to go start this whole process over somewhere else? And yes, I would love to kind of gain a more rounded experience and learn to sell different technologies and under different management and things like that, and eventually that will be my path. But I've gotten to become exposed to so many things so fast by just staying the course. And I was very fortunate working for an organization that was on such a growth trajectory and had so many opportunities, and a lot of people may not have that their organization, you've got to be cognizant of that. But I did. I was. I was able to balance learning and earning pretty well throughout the last several years, and I think that's been a reason that I have been a lifer at my current orig, I guess. Well, I think there's something that a lot of folks can probably glean from this right if they are in that habit of Switching jobs every 18 months. So when you find yourself plateau going right in some way or another, who starts that conversation right? Has that been your leadership that says, Hey, Parker, you know, we've noticed you've really started to just kind of crush it at this current role, and maybe you're getting a little plateau or a little complacent, or you kind of maxed out your potential at this job. Here's this new thing to try or do you say, Hey, I'm kind of feeling...

...internally like I'm losing the drive a little bit. I'm plateau going. I need a challenge like, can we put something else on my plate? How does that conversation usually go? I think that's a That's a great question. You know, I think there's a couple of views to this because I've been in both situations. I've been in situations where being overeager can actually hurt your chances of growth because it almost comes off as ungrateful or impatient. And I've seen it a number of times where somebody who has one win or two wins, they're like, I want a promotion now and it's like, Well, that's not the right timing for it or whatever the case may be, but it's somebody kind of. The people kind of keep their head down and have that consistent wind. But they make sure people know about their winds, of course, and they're, you know, they're creating a an audience, an alignment within the executive group or whatever, but they're constantly winning, and they're just doing it because that's their job. Those people tend to come out ahead, but the other side of camp is, You know, I think in terms of sensing your plateau, if you sense that you're no longer growing and being challenged, you're the only one that's going to know that most likely, like sure, there's somebody who there's great leaders out there who could see like okay, this person needs to be challenged more like they're too far in their comfort zone to see outside of it, and we're going to pull them out of it and that that does exist. But a lot of times you're gonna know more. So where those boundaries may or may not be, at least when you feel a plateau coming. And I think a philosophy for me has always been okay. So once I feel pretty comfortably that I've mastered close to master the current role I'm in or the current task that I'm doing, you know, just start working on the next thing. You know, obviously, don't don't drop any of the duties and responsibilities that you have and that you've agreed to an assigned to those are yours. But you almost have to start thinking to the job you want and and performing and acting within the job you want. And you see this a lot advice where people are like, you know, you don't have to be, you know, be promoted to a leadership position. To be a leader, you could be a leaders and they eat within your team. You just have to go out of your way and coach people and things like that, and leadership will notice that kind of stuff. I think very much so. The rest of the organization, the team will notice things like that. And so for me, it's It's been a combination, you know? I think a dark trace done a great job and identifying when I'm I'm getting a little bit restless or when there's an opportunity around that, they think I'll be a good fit for they reach out. But it's also been me taking on other projects that I didn't necessarily have to. But I was trying to constantly challenge myself into new things and an example of this was before I was promoted my current role, which is kind of overseeing the commercial growth and strategy for all of the Americas. I was a regional vice president in the Southwest. I was overseeing largely just the commercial, some of the operations because I built that office up. But one of the things that led to this new role was I started looking at trends across the business. I started...

...looking at things that were concerning not just me, but other people, executives and otherwise other regional VPs, and I started working to identify and use data to try to find You know what those trends could be associated towards, like, what was the cause of some of this negative outcome? And where can we make improvements and experiment to try to fix those things? And, uh, you know, I'm trying to be very vague because I don't want to share too much, but effectively, I was able to use I went and use data and experimented to solve one of the key problem, which was one of the challenges that we had was kind of moving up market as an average rather than kind of slowly trickling back down market. And I was able to use data to kind of solve one of the key areas that was leading to that movement down market and make a trend back in the right direction, which is the direction the business wanted to go. I was able to support it with data. I was able to find it using data, and that was way outside of my roll. Like I wasn't in sales office. I barely I didn't have a sales office person under me or anything like that. I just kind of did it on my own. And then I was fortunate to have somebody in sales has helped me out with some of the data in the back. And then I presented that to management and they were like, Great, you should You should try to do this more broadly. And so it was kind of working in that role that you want and finding your next opportunity by acting in it, I think. Yeah, and how much time like would you say? Like, what was your split? Right. So you get to the point where you feel like you've mastered the current role or close to it, right? And you see this opportunity and it sounds like you did that as a rep and you've done that as a leader as well. And you find this opportunity that you can make a bigger impact. And you also probably understand that this is going to be catapult your career forward, right? If done well, what's the percentage of time split that you spend on, like the current role versus, like, this new opportunity? Oh, I mean, it's it's like 80 20. It's like Pareto principle kind of thing, you know? Um, but It's a pretty a marginal split right the majority of my time and still spent doing my day to day role. But then I maybe it's like, you know, we may take on side projects. I think Google still lets their employees do similar thing, which is really smart because you never know what somebody is going to be able to think about when you have all these collective brains working together with different experiences. So I think it's still a majority of my time spent doing my current role too small bit of my time Doing other things, but that that ratio probably changes the longer I am in that role because you optimize a lot of processes. You get a lot better like when I get into a new role, like 110% of my time is spent trying to figure out how to do that job until I start clicking and I start making realizations and then I okay, I could do the same work in less time and then you optimize and you get systems in place and then suddenly you know you can get eight hours worth of work done...

...and four and so on and so forth. And I think so. The ratio changes, the more mastery you gain at your existing role. You could have free up more time to do other things. Yeah, absolutely. So one topic I wanted to talk about. You brought up your 80 HD earlier. And, uh, I saw one of your posts on it that I really liked and thought this would be helpful conversation to have and and your post was something to the extent of like saying that you have a d h d. And you know that you get distracted pretty frequently, But yet you've also really excelled in all these different things we're talking about. And just like some of the tips that or things or habits that you have that kind of help you stay focused. I'd love a few, shared a few thoughts on that. Yeah, definitely. I mean, it's still I'm playing with a stress ball right now, and I don't know if you can stay on the camera. I'm like, constantly touching stuff like moving stuff around. You know, it helps to a point, I guess, but it's still very much there. Um, so I think focus has been really hard, and I don't I'm not one, you know. I don't like taking like medication to help with that. It's just not my thing. You know, it's totally okay if that's your thing or some people need it to to solve their like imbalances or whatever for me. I just always tried to stay more natural. So, you know, taking like Adderall or Ritalin or something that was just it was never an option for me. So I had to find other ways to kind of manage manage my mentality. And there's a lot of stuff like, you know, meditation and those kind of mental focus and other exercises that I think are helpful for everybody. No matter what I mean, it's just so good to get tuned with yourself and understand your own mind and emotions and stuff like that. I think that's really helpful. But then there's like the actual, like tactical tips, so doing things like time blocking. I used to keep a like a like a small clock on my desk, and I put 30 minutes down and I'm OK. I'm only doing this one task for 30 minutes, and that's it. until that time is up. I'm only focused on this shutting down email my personal phone, much to the frustration of my parents and friends doesn't have, like, sound notifications on it. So if somebody calls me if my phone is on silent calls tax, etcetera, I just get the pop up. I don't get any sounds or anything like that to pull me away and distract me. So, like little things like that have always been really helpful. And then one of my favorites is, uh is like, kind of this, like parking lot approach where you, you know, I just have a lot of random thoughts throughout the day. And if you're not careful, you know, I can let that just take me away for, like, 30 minutes or an hour. And I'm down this, like Internet and YouTube rabbit hole, like researching this one little stupid thought I had. So I have this kind of parking lot of ideas that keep a notebook or notes in my phone, and I'll just write it down. I'll just have this parking lot, just random thoughts that...

...popped in my head, and I'll just write it down and then we'll revisit it later in the day. And if it was really something I want to explore, I can't because there's some good thoughts that pop in my head. But I know if I let myself be taken by that thought for too long, it will completely distract from what I'm doing. So I just put them down, save it for later and then try to revisit it in its own time block. So little things like that are really helpful for me. But for those who spent enough time with me, they have known that it hasn't necessarily solved my a d h d. But it has helped me stay productive. Yeah, and on a similar thread we were talking before we started recording about kind of like over filling your plate with tasks and responsibilities and obligations you mentioned. As of late, you have kind of tried to start shrinking that back a little bit to be more focused. Could you talk a little bit about how you do that? If it's a way that you say no to people, if it's maybe it's time blocking like you mentioned as being more productive at certain hours of the day, that allow you to do that and focus. I'm curious what actions you've taken to kind of shrink some of your tasks back. Yeah, I think the biggest one is your first point, which is being willing and able to say no. And I saw a post this morning. Actually, I can't remember who posted it, But apologies if it was you and you're listening, Uh, but I saw a post that was talked about being protective of your time, how it's the most critical asset and how this person, I think, reduced their work week from 5 to 44 days and they saw zero different productivity and they start cutting all these other projects out delegating. And I think that's all well and good. You know, I think saying no to things that aren't aligned with your goals and your missions is something that everybody needs to learn to do. And it's really tempting, especially in a career when earlier career, Whatever. Just say yes to everything. And sometimes that's helpful, right? If you're early in your career and your mission is to get ahead, then yeah, maybe you just want to volunteer for a bunch of stuff until you find your group. But eventually you kind of know where you're trying to go, and you can very easily identify. Okay, Does this webinar really benefit me in any way? Like, does this move me toward my goal? Okay. No. Then why am I doing it? Why am I spending time working on this? And it's distracting me from other things, right? So saying no is the first one. And I had a ton of, like, mastermind groups and all these other things that I was participating in and just dipping my toe in way too many different waters. And I had to start cutting those back saying, Is this really align with my goal? Is this really mission driven or oriented? And if not, then cut it out. It doesn't matter, like, why am I focusing on it? It's just a distraction. I'm not going to put enough energy into that one thing to make it worthwhile, And it's sucking energy away from the things that are moving towards that mission. So just saying no to those projects, those little side tasks, those things...

...that aren't distracted, I think, is the biggest one for me more than almost anything else in terms of cutting down on time. The second biggest one is still time blocking because people have access to my calendar and I'll notice stuff just kind of populates on it if I'm not very careful. So in the morning I block out like a two hour chunk of time in the afternoon. I blocked at a two hour chunk of time, and those are just no matter what those times for me to focus on whatever project that I need to focus on, those are always blocked a recursive everyday in my calendar. It doesn't break except for extreme exceptions. But I think I think those two things is is what's helped me try to stay focused and try to make sure my plate doesn't get too full because it's happened before. And it is absolutely miserable to try to juggle all of those plates, and you just feel like you're moving backwards. You're not making any meaningful progress when you're trying to do too much. Yeah, it's super timely because I've been over my recent vacation. For the listeners. This is the first conversation I've had with a human in a work capacity coming back from vacation, so hopefully I'm hanging in there. But I've been reading Free to Focus by Michael Hyatt. I don't know if you've read that or are familiar with it, but it came as a I think I saw Drift CEO David Cancel talk about a while ago and picked it up and about halfway through. And it's talking a lot about this type of stuff, essentially, how to get more done in less time. And a lot of it is about cutting things out, automating it, delegating it, time blocks, things like that. I love it. I have not read it, but it's now in my Kindle cart, so thank you for that recommendation. But I assume it's similar to the principles of like the four hour work week and stuff like that, which, which, you know, contrary to popular belief, isn't about working four hours a week. It's about optimizing your time so that you have more dedicated focus towards the things that really matter that the needles That's interesting. Thank you for the recommendation. Yeah, absolutely. Just on the topic of of learning and reading and things like that, any books or resources that have either helped you a lot throughout your career or that you mentioned to people to to read whether it's sales or leadership or psychology or anything, like any topic really is fair game. Yeah, um, you know, I'm sitting next to one of my bookshelves here, and I love reading so I could kind of go down this path for a while. I used to when I was an SCR was reading about a book a week, which turned out to be a bit bit overwhelming, So I've cut that back. But there's a few books that I love, and it changes. That list changes constantly, but I think you know if I'm going to talk about more career growth stuff. One book that I've read recently that has been phenomenal is seeing the big picture by Kevin Cope. And if you're an aspiring executive or you, you want to kind of grow your business career outside of maybe just the sales function or whatever the case is, it's really important that you understand the bigger picture concepts around business, and this was like one...

...of the best books I've read for that in terms of just really putting that perspective seeing the big picture by Kevin Cooper's Great some of my all time favorites like 48 Laws of Power. I love that book. I recently reread Marcus Aurelius meditations, which is a fantastic if you're big on kind of mentality. You know, he's an original, stoic philosopher, so fantastic, kind of meditative book stuff, but I think those are kind of some of my favorites right now. But ask me again in three months, that list will change. Yeah, I love it. I love it. Those are both great great recommendations. I have not read the first one seeing the big picture. I've never heard of it before, but I haven't noted down and we'll check it out. So I appreciate the book recommendation, of course. So last question for you before we kind of wrap things up. Obviously, we're talking on the pavilion podcast. Huge emphasis of the group is, you know, networking and helping other people out and trying to grow your career by helping others. So I'm just curious whether it's pavilion related or not. Just your number one networking tip that you have for people that are trying to grow their career. Oh man and This is something I'm still figuring out every day. I think a couple of things. I don't know if I could distill it down to one, but I think what's really important is that you find a group like pavilion or another mastermind type of group with like minded people trying to receive similar goals. You just want to be in the room. It's kind of like the five people you spend the most time with is who you'll likely become sort of thing if you're not getting. If you're not having the conversations, you want your current group. It's so easy now, especially with technology. Go out and find a group like that where you could immediately have conversations with like minded people. So that's that's my number one. I've done that in my investing career. I've done that, my sales career. I think that if I'm going to pick a number one, that's it. The other one is like, you know, for me I've found tremendous value and working to build a bit of a brand online, and I'm no master at this by any means, but I've using things like LinkedIn to try to create a voice and try to use it to genuinely connect with people. One of my favorite things to do. And I've been really bad about it the last week because we've been slammed at the end of year and stuff. But every morning I would try to go through my connections on LinkedIn. I'd send a video out to somebody Brandon Moore who had chat with in the past just, you know, kind of thanking them for being part of my network. And however we met whatever experience we had, you know, kind of just gratitude for having them in my network, but more importantly, sending them a bit of positivity in the morning, just letting them know that just changing their day up, you know, getting something else out there, like doing things like that is reminding yourself that at the end of the day, we're all we're all people. We're all human, and it helps to have a little bit of a human touch and human outreach Every now and then, you know, just make the outreach, and I know you know, Tom, you you reached out to Mark Cuban way back when when you had a tough quarter. I saw that post, and I thought that was awesome. You know, just make the outreach. You know, if you want to talk to somebody, if you want to meet somebody, just do it. I think that's...

...gonna be really important. And, um, you know, don't make it about any agenda. Just reach out if you have a question people love to help people ask the question. I'm sure somebody will be willing to help you. And similarly, if anybody ever wants to reach out to me, please do. I love chatting with people and getting all calls, and I don't know a lot yet, but if I can help you in some way, I Absolutely Yeah, that's awesome. I love that video tip. I'm gonna have to steal that. And, uh, double down on the positivity that's out there. Yes, sir. I love it. I love it. We could all use a bit more in our lives. Yeah, for sure. Well, Parker, I appreciate you coming on. If anyone has questions for you about anything that we talked about, they want to meet up. They They want to get a video from you on LinkedIn. What's the best place to catch up with you? Yeah, man. Um, definitely linked in. Just reach out. You can find me on their. Alternatively, I I have a website with, like, account Li Link. If you're really so inclined to book time, I probably should share that, though, because who knows what kind of calendars? Invite somebody beginning soon. But Lincoln is probably the number one. You reach out to shoot me a message. I'm happy to connect. Awesome park. I appreciate your time, man. This is great. Yeah. Thank you, Tom. I appreciate you having me on. It's good to catch up. All right. Thanks for checking out that episode again. This was brought to you by Sandoz. So they deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make your outreach more personal. I'll be back next Monday with another episode. Until then, hit me up on LinkedIn and get after it. Peace, If you see some, he says mhm.

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