The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 2 months ago

Ep 241: Proactive Sales Enablement w/ Brie Clements

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Proactive Sales Enablement w/ Brie Clements

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone, and welcome back to the pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon Martin. You are listening to is this a good time? The show where I put pavilion members on the hot seat for fifteen minutes. Here. They're incredible stories. Shows are out on Thursday's hit. Subscribe. Do not miss hearing from our experts. Today our expert is one of uh in sales enablement, brick clement. She's the director of sales enablement for for the record, really interesting company. Um, and we talk about how do you make sales enablement proactive? UH, some really interesting stuff for those those that are interested in that part of the sales space. This episode was brought to you by contract book. Raise your hand if you love managing contracts. We didn't think so. Contract book created an all in one contract automation platform with data at the heart of everything, to help organizations automate mundane tasks that waste your valuable time, energy and resources. VISIT CONTRACT BOOK DOT COM to access contract books complete set of automation tools for free. All right, let's do this episode one seventeen. Is this a good time? Alright, very excited to have bree clements with US bree is the director of sales enablement at for the record, Adam in Minneapolis, a very up and coming pavilion chapter. Brie, thank you for being on. Yeah, absolutely, thanks for having me excited to be here today. Awesome, awesome. Well, look, I'll meet no filler. We jump right into the question. So tell us a little bit about what do you do it for the record and uh, and then go all the way back and back up into kind of the beginning of your career. How did you get involved in sales, sales enablement and so forth? But let's start with for the record. Yeah, absolutely. So I started up for the record back in January of this year, and for the record is a really cool company because it's really focused on the mission of making sure that the official record of the courts is captured, so that way it's helping promote democracy and transparency of that actual record. So we have a sap, where is a service solution that we offer, and we're in seventy...

...four different countries and we've been growing like crazy. So it's been a really exciting time to be there and I'm doing all things sales enablement, so making sure that there's no barriers for the sales team and our sales team is almost completely new, so we've been on boarding a lot of people. Wow, where were you guys for the Supreme Court stuff? No, I'm just kidding. Um. Uh, you scrub the record. That's called. Sorry. Yeah, I mean that's incredible. So, so it's it sounds like you are you selling into basically governments for the most part. Is it always like official, uh, you know, you're in all these countries. Is always kind of official legal, UM, kind of cases that you're you're working with. Is there specialty there? Is it for other industries as well? Yeah, so we primarily work with the courts, Um, and so usually a lot of the funny does come from the government, but we are just starting to get into the legal space. So working a lot with attorneys and that's Um and especially exciting space right now because we have a new technology that's coming out soon which is basically like Syrian the courtrooms, but it's a whole lot more accurate, and that has been really exciting because it's a speech to text in real time, so you can actually see and hear what people are seeing, Um, and it's especially impactful for witnesses and everybody else in the courtroom to be able to read that as people are providing their testimony. Interesting, wow, Um, I love it. And so how did you get involved in in sales in general? I mean seems like you know a couple of places where you spent a lot of time, like side improve and so forth on. Don't you go back to the you know, what got you into being an SDR, all the way, all the way, you know, uh, several years back? Yeah, so I'll start from the beginning. Um, so, right out of college I was actually a caretaker for a family and seven kids and that was Super Fun. Um, but I think that's where my like drive for efficiency, in streamlining everything, I came from,...

...right because you have seven. And then I realized I didn't want to be Mary poppins and I needed a more sustainable career path, and so that's how I got into kind of the Saas world through a family friend. They told me about it. It was a completely new industry to me, I feel like in college and even growing up, unless you know somebody in the industry, it's basically like a whole new space to uncover. And so I started out in a very entry level role, being a B Dr Making cold calls all day and at first I was like this is really hard, like trying to get around gate keepers and people being rude, and then I figured out how to open really well on my cold calls and I loved it and I kind of became the cold calling queen back in seventeen when I started. So I was at the top of my team and then I moved into an account executive role and that was really exciting to me because I really loved the whole discovery process of really uncovering um how we can help people solve whatever painting that they're experiencing at the are nization. And every year we would have a quarterly award called the listener award, and that was based off of the conversational intelligence tool gone and I always had the best talk to lisious in ratio and everybody was like how are you getting all this information out of people, and I was like, well, I pause, I hit you, I used to maybe Chris boss techniques of mirroring right, and people just keep talking because people hate silence. And that's where it was really exciting to be able to see that success just grow wild. And then I had one of our executives be like, we're trying to figure out how to continue to grow, because when I joined the company, sided for were hyper girl forty percent year every year. We're like trying to figure out how do we keep being more revenue out of our current customers? You're really good at kind of listening and figuring things out. Do you mind just going into this role and seeing what you can do? So then I move into account management it and they're like,...

...oh my gosh, you're doing such a great job, we're gonna build this team out. So it went from one person to sixteen people in the matter of a year, and then I started onboarding all these people and that's where some of the sales enablement juices started flowing, where I was like there's gotta be an easier way to onboard all these people and share all the knowledge that I know in my head, and I started seeing those people find success really quickly and that filled my cup up more than me hitting my quota at a hundred and twenty five percent and seeing my deals win, but seeing those people go from like knowing absolutely nothing to then being like an expert and so confident and comfortable, and that that's where they were like, have you ever considered enablement? And at that time we didn't really have anything and enablement. It was more like learning and development and that was under hr and that was kind of in like a different space. So then I get hired, and this is almost a year ago now, into enablement. I have my whole team that's in learning and development and there were based out of Copenhagen and because it's summer, they all go on their summer holiday. The manager that hired me goes out of maternity leave. So I'm all jacked and super excited to start this new position and then everybody who I thought was going to be there to support me then leaves for an extending period of time and I'm like what do I do? How do I get started? What does success look like? Now I'm all alone and I'm trying to figure out this stuff out. And that's actually how I heard about pavilion. And then I started talking with all these people in enablement at pavilion and they were like, Oh, don't do this, we did that when we first started. It was horrible, and they started telling me all these like little dirty secrets of enablement, of like this is how you actually find success, you have to have a champion. Sure, do you have a charter? Here's an example of my charter. And everybody started sharing all this information and it was so inclusive to be a part of that community. That's Rad that's such that's such a cool story and...

I love the transition from, you know, managing obviously younger children, perhaps two salespeople. I'm sure a lot of the I've said this before about others who are parents, like some of the tactics that work with my kids also are the same things that that do work with, you know, with members of our team. We're all, uh, the base computer is all the same, whether you're five or whether you're twenty five. So well, look, we we always talk about luck and and hard work and kind of being the two elements to get you, you know, somewhere. I wonder if you have any kind of, you know, moments of luck that have really accelerated your career. I mean you even touched on one way. You said, Hey, there was a family friend that introduced me to SAS. Love you to touch on on any of that. Yeah, so I definitely think there's hard work and luck, and so I think, yes, I was blessed to have a family friend that got me the interview, but I would also say I did a lot of hard work before even had conversation with that family friend, doing informational interviews, and I started doing those when I was in college just to try and figure out, like what do I actually want to do, because it seems like there was a disconnect between like what this ideal career was and then like what the actual day to day of what that job looked like, and so that's where I wanted to get into more of the nitty gritty and the grind of like what are people actually doing in their day to day and is that something that I would be passionate about? And so all of those informational interviews is what led me to that family friend and then I did a bunch more informational interviews to try and figure out, like is this truly something I'd be interested in? And if somebody would have asked me ten years ago saftware sales, I would have laughed and been like no way, that sounds so boring, and now it's something that I'm super excited and passionate about because I really understand the impact that it has on our overall users and community. I love that. I love that and you know, obviously you know throughout your years you've learned a lot. You said you've learned...

...a lot through pavilion. You must have, you know, tactics when it comes to sales enablement that could supercharge somebody else's efforts. I wonder like share a couple of those, I mean, or even go into a little bit of like those dudes and don'ts that you started to talk about, now that you've kind of set up your own program and now have had, you know, six months of setting up a new one in a new company. Yeah, so something that I think is really easy for people who are an enablement to get stuck in is being reactive, because enablement can be this catch all to try and fix all of the problems that the sales team might be facing. And so a good way just to get around that and to be more proactive is to really build out a charter. But to be able to build out a charter you really have to understand what are the needs of the organization. So one of the first things I did when I started out for the record back in January was just a needs analysis and talking to everybody on the sales team, but across the organization with the different department heads, just to understand what's their current state, what's working, what's not working, what are some quick wins that people see but they might not have the time or bandwidth for the best approach strategically to implement. And then after that, then I wasn't able to align that with our businesses priorities and then get some alignment and buy in from the leadership team to understand the importance of some of these strategic projects that I was going to be starting to work on. And getting that buy in was super important because all of these priorities. Now that I've been in this role for about six months, a lot of those things have changed as the business has evolved, and so having that constant alignment is super important and that was something that during my time at side, improved. It was a really big challenge because there are different members of our leadership team that weren't aligned on those core priorities and it almost made it seem like I would talk to one person and they would be like yes, go to this initiative,...

...and then I attacked to another person and they'd be like no, why are you working on that? That's not something that should be a priority right now. So getting on alignment at the top from the very beginning is so crucial. Um, and then in that charter there's a lot of things like defining what sales enablement means. A lot of other enablers that I've talked to it can mean something different at their organization. So having that common definition, while it seems pretty rudimentary and simple, is so important to everybody actually understands. Where is your focus, who's your audience that you're actually serving at the end of the day? And then what are you not going to do? And I think six stating what you're not going to do is as equally as important as stating what you are going to do. That's great. Just really quickly define the charter because, like, I don't know if everyone understands what that means. Is it is it kind of like a one page or like define what that is. Yeah, so I've seen lots of different examples of charters, but the one that I use and the one I'm using currently really outlines what sales enablement is, what my mission and focus is, who I'm serving, my key projects based off of my needs analysis and alignment with leadership what I won't be doing, and then having different metrics that are tied to the projects that I'm doing that are going to achieve a certain business outcome. That's super important to be able to measure what you're actually working on and doing. A lot of times in enablement people will look at surveys and things that are a little bit more subjective, but at the end of the day the business needs to perform and we're all here to grow revenue Um and that's where I want my metrics tied to. And then my overall communication strategy and plan and having a way to articulate to the organization on either an annually, quarterly, monthly or weekly basis what we're doing to really help support the sales team. I love that, and any positions that you're currently hiring for. So we're...

...hiring for our customers support team right now because we've really built out our sales team, but our sales team keeps bringing in so many new customers that we need more people to help support them, and so that is one area that's really growing a lot just because as customers are getting set up Um and they're running into different support things that they need that I extra help with. That's the team that we're really trying to help support, the support team. I love it. Love it. And what about shoutouts? I mean, who are people that you know either their content or their message inspires you and you would say other people should follow. Yeah, so one that has actually evolved in the last couple of months is uh Balyn uh and I'm not even sure how to pronounce her last name. I've briefly worked with her, but it's Uh Vaga and she just started her own personal brand company and it's called word with two D's, and she started it with somebody that she met on Linkedin and they had never met in person and they met through their networks. And she has so much content about how to build up your own personal brand and she's been really inspiring to follow because she quit corporate job she started this company with somebody that she never met, but she's really talking about the importance of having your own personal brand and how you can continue to establish and grow your personal brand as your career walls. I love that. That's great. and Uh of course. Last but not least, I ask everyone, and I need to know, can be a mini can be anywhere you wanted to be, but you've got to give us a you know, a restaurant that we should go check out. Yeah, so, Um, one of my favorite spots that I went to earlier this year was in South Beach Miami, in Florida, and I was actually there during all the Formula One racing. Um.

But Gianni Versacchi, his mansion got turned into a restaurant and the atmosphere and all of the food is super good. One of my friends ordered dinner in this giant cheese wheel and it's basically like Fetacchini Alfredo, but they mix it up in this giant Parmesan wheel and then it's just like coated in cheese and they bring it out to you and do the whole presentation at your table. Um, and they also have fun things like twenty four Carrot Gold Margarita. So it's definitely a fun spot to go check out. A lot a luxe experience, Um, and a little and a little bit warmer than than where you are in in many so hey, so great to have you on. I'm sure there are so many others who, Um, you know, either want to have a career path and in sales enablement ind or, you know, have questions about it. Great to hear your perspective on it and I hope people reach out to you around the halls of pavilion as uh as you're continuing to be an expert in space. Yeah. Well, thanks again for having me. Happy to be here and Um, feel free to connect with me on Linkedin. I'm always happy to share my journey of kind of having navigated from sales into sales enablement. Love it. Thanks all right, that's the show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love a show, rate and review apple podcast, spotify APP, send me an email, send me a slack. I want to hear about it. I want to hear that you loved talking with Brie, or just send it to some friends and have them listen to this great episode as well. This particular episode was brought to you by contract book. Contract Books Digital Contracts Management Platform, allows scaling businesses to automate and manage the entire contract like syn cycle, in one flow. GET STARTED FOR FREE AT CONTRACT BOOK DOT Com. I had so much fun today. I hope you did too. Now get out and crush your numbers.

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