The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

Ep 220: Talking Sales Leadership & Career Growth w/ Tim Dorris, CRO at Stensul

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 220: Talking Sales Leadership & Career Growth w/ Tim Dorris, CRO at Stensul 

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Book. All right, everybody, welcome back to the pavilion podcast. Thank God it's Monday. This is the show that gives revenue leaders the tips, tricks and tactics they need to be successful. This month our podcast is being sponsored by outreach, the sales execution platform that helps revenue organizations deliver predictable, efficient growth. All Right, today I am interviewing Tim Doris. He's the crow over at Stencil. He's a limited partner for the go to market fund, which I know a lot of pavilion members are an exact member of pavilion for over three years. Prior to Stencil, he was a VP of sales over at Zuovo. He was the head of sales at convers social. His main, you know, stin early in his career, for about six years, was at Bronto software and he rose from, you know, entry level up to director of sales, and so we talked about how he progresses his career, sales leadership, his philosophy, what he's growing at Stencil, the different growth that you need between being a VP and a c sweet member, which is really interesting. So love talking to Tim. I hope you enjoyed as well and not let's get straight into the content here. All right, coming out of New York. New York, on the pavilion podcast we got Tim Doris, the Cro of Stencil, Tim Good Morton. How are you any time to very well, how are you? I'm doing well. I'm like sneakily kind of fired up to see that you're in a phone booth right now and I like in the office and you know, that just gets me excited because I missed the days personally of the sales floor and the collaboration and just all of that. The last two years have been tough for me because of that. That just that that's exciting to see. Yeah, it's really great. You know, we're just north of Madison Square Park. If you're familiar with New York, it's a beautiful sunny day. You get a few more steps in coming in the office and you know, right now it's completely optional, but we have a lot of people, you know, coming in and really enjoying sort of a different scenery, a bit more space and,...

...of course, you know, being able to spend some time with colleagues, collaborate together, have a bit of fun, and so yeah, it's been been really great. That's awesome. I'd love to before we get into what you're doing its sense, I'll talk a little bit about the earlier days of your sales career. So I saw, at least from Linkedin, looks like you started at Bronto software for the first six and a half years and the first job maybe wasn't exactly sales, is like lead qualifications. I'd love to just hear the story of how you got into sales. I don't know if you did anything like in college or before that, but but I'd love to hear that story. Yeah, in college my first internship was with a organization called university directories and it's a really interesting business model and I think they're still around in a slightly different form. But what they would do then is bid on the rights with all the kind of major universities in the US to publish their college directory, which is like the phone, College Phone Book Right Essentially, and eventually they did other more modern things like a planner and then then eventually web stuff. But when I entered with them, you know, they would publish those school directories and then they would hire hundreds of interns for the summer as they would go to all the career fairs at the College's recruit folks interested in trying sales for the summer and then they would kind of put you in a market and so, you know, you work a certain you know, I was in the Greensboro, North Carolina area, and you're there's a few different schools that they published directories for and then you're kind of going around doortodoor business to business, selling advertising space in that directory. And so rule it was a really well oiled machine in terms of the recruiting the training. They would fly everybody in at the beginning of the summer to do like pretty intensive sales on one training and then you would spend the whole summer doing that and you'd report up every every morning and every afternoon about the plan, about your sales for that day, and there's a national leaderboard and all that kind of stuff, and that was my first taste of sales and and I you know, it's really hard work, obviously, to sort of step into that...

...environment where you get sort of like, you know, kicked out of stores and stuff like that, but it was a great learning experience. I really enjoyed being in control of my own destiny. Right Hey, I've got I've got my feet, I've got my book, I've got, you know, the day to spend. I'm going to make the most of it and I'm going to try to be, you know, the best, you know sales intern for the summer and did that and came back the next summer as a like manager of some of the interns at a few different markets across like North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee. So you're like a college kid, you know, spending the summer driving, you know, around this little region, doing ride alongs with other interns and reps and and that was another great experience. But yeah, that's that's kind of my first taste in sales before even graduated college. That's great. I've told this story before on the Pod, but I started in Cutcoa in college as well. And you've got to be a twisted individual, I feel like, to you know, enjoy so like I enjoyed, you know, going door to door, and I feel like that's probably a very, very small, you know, one percent or less of the population that would actually get some sort of joy and pleasure and satisfaction from doing that job versus it being, you know, their worst nightmare. was that job like something that, you know, was pushed to you, like you're like, oh, I maybe I'd be good at sales, or's like Hey, I'm in college, I need a job for the summer and like I'll just try this thing. I didn't know if he had any predisposition to like sales or talking to people or anything like that. Yeah, I think I think from talking to like upper classmen and other people, I sort of narrated down to sales and marketing. So I feel like I was going around the career fair looking at both of those types of roles and, you know, this is the one that sort of stood out as as what would be a really good experience and you know, but really, I mean it wasn't a sophisticated decision. It was kind of like you get a few offers and and you're like okay, like I'll pick this one and we'll spend the summer. You know, it's only three months. Like it's not a huge, you know, decision at the time, but it really does set the course for for a lot of other things. Either to continue on that track or, if you don't like it, to do something Elson. That's the...

...whole point of an internship, right. Just sort of experimented, test and see, you know, is this for me or is this not? Yeah, yeah, completely agree. And then at Bronto it looked like mean you you rose up the ranks. Your role after that was head of sales, and so that was in like six seven years. You went from lead qualification associate to head of sales at a start up, and so I'd love to just hear, you know, obviously performed well and you hit numbers and things like that, but anything else that you would kind of like point to your success of how you were always kind of continuing to get yourself ready for the next role, in the next role and continue to progress. Yeah, I mean, first of all, it was an amazing run for the company and for a lot of people involved there. I mean I really just cherish those years of Bronto, and I'm not alone. If you talk to like Brown too, alum, there's a really strong community, even years later, of people who you know is just the time of their life, time of their career really. You know, I ended up at Bronto very you knows, a lot of luck of what of how I land it there. So I was initially looking at a different role coming out of college, and there's a kind of a long story but essentially the the office I was looking to go into, the guy run in the office left the company and so shut that office down in North Carolina and it took a while to like get back in touch with the recruit and everybody else had that company like well, we shut the office down, we still have the role open and the offer still valid, but it's in New York now and was like the say, but at the same pay as North Carolina. And you know, I really didn't have any interest in moving to New York. It wasn't really where I was trying to go. And then for the same pay is just like I like, I'm going to pass on this and end up getting in touch with a guy who was going to report to he was like, I actually took a job as coming called Bronto and they have similar opening to what I was going to hire you for. You should come check it out, and so that was that lead qual it. Basically it's an str roll, but it was under marketing and you know, just the SDR term didn't exist then, or wasn't...

...very popular at least, and so yeah, very like chance. You know that that sort of sequens sequence of events happened. But I joined we're about forty was employee number forty four. We were there in Durham and the American tobacco campus really really cool part of town, like a on the verge of all the downtown restaurant restoration of Durham there in two thousand and nine. And Yeah, to be honest, I wasn't the top performing SDR or lead qualification associate. I was like pretty good, but I wasn't at the top. But I really liked the sales part of it and that's almost what slowed my numbers down. You know, I wanted to get more into discovery versus just passing the meeting off and things like that. And you know, I done sales before. I had confidence in myself that I could I could do a sales roll. At that time all the salespeople were like enterprise sellers, so they were going after big deals. They had a lot of experience and I didn't see a career path, you know, beyond lead qualification associate. And so I started to get a little bit frustrated and updated my resume and was starting to like look around on and one of the top sales people sort of heard through a company I was applying that I was looking around and he sort of whispered in to the the ear of the VP of sales like hey, I think this guy might have something you you know, we should look at having a role for him. And at the time they were thinking about launching their first mid market role, and so that like kind of whisper in the ear and we didn't really have a process for how to apply into a different apartment. Right I was reporting in a marketing and so I had to like apply on our website and it went through like hr and they rejected my resume because I didn't have like the sales experience they're looking for, and just kind of a weird process thinking back to it. Anyway, I just went directly to the VP of sales and was like look, I know we're opening for this role. Here's what I've done in my like sales internships, here's what I've done in this role. I really think I could come in and do well. I want to have a shot at it and you know, he listened to me, and credit to him. He said, look, we'll put you to the process of everything else and if you're the best candidate, will move forward. So I had like sneak around to like interview for this...

...in the same company. But I did the like pitch I did to the whole thing and you know, I had some people that were really helpful and preparing for that and anyway, I feel like I did well. And I met with Matt Williamson, who's the VP of sales at the time, again and part of what he had said was like look, my family wellbeing is on the line for you taking this role right, and so I have this vision of like almost putting a picture of my family, my kids, on your desks. You sort of know what's at stake and it's like a very like power whole thing at the time and I was like well, you look, let me, let me think about it. I don't want to react to early to that statement. That's that's very real for you, and let me let me take that in consideration and and let you know I feel tomorrow. And I came in the next the next morning. It's like adm and he's at his desk and I had bought a picture frame, just like a CVs or whatever, and I came in and put the picture frame on his desk and I was like I'm ready, and you know, he sat a smirk and he just looked back and he shook my hand and you know, pretty soon I had an offer for that mid market role. But yeah, that was a that was a big, big step in my career, just moving from that sort of lead qual role into that first commercially your first mid market a yearl man. Sometimes you just need, you know, things need to align, you know, like that. That salesperson had to have her through the grape vine you were leaving. They obviously saw something in you and you need people to take, you know, chances on you earlier in your career, right so that you can prove them right. Yeah, and you know, when I look back and at my career, there's been so many people like that that, for whatever reason, just saw something in me or willing to go out of their way to help. And you know, certainly it's you got to have the attitude and mentality of being proactive and having belief in yourself and wanting to learn and absorb that coaching and apply it. But people can sense that. People can sense, okay, you want to make something happen and I think you're going to actually listen to what I have to say and apply it. You know you'll be surprised about how many people will respond to that and invest in you and the trajectory that that can put you on. Yeah, feels like it's you know, it's it's not. I...

...hate to say it's, but it's not incredibly hard to stand out, oftentimes right, if you do the small things well and your coachable and, you know, you take what your leaders are saying and you try to come up with new ideas and new processes and try to build like it's yeah, I've at least in my experience, that you get recognized if you have a decent or good or great leader. You know they'll recognize if you're, you know, willing to take on extra responsibility and ready to get to the next step. So I don't I think sometimes it's easy for people in my age bracket to maybe be more entitled to Hey, I've been here for a year or six months or three years, like I'm ready for that next role. But I think you have to prove that you're ready for it before it just gets handed to you. Yeah, and I think that's it's not just a generation thing. I think it's that mentality difference exists across many generations. You know, some people want to go and make something happen and some people, you know, want it all mapped out for them. And certainly we have to do our part as leaders to have, you know, a career path designed so people can see, you know, the vision of their role and things like that. But for me personally, the biggest roles that I've taken on and the ones that are the most trajectory changing have been the ones that weren't outlined on a spreadsheeter or presentation, and it's sort of you seen opportunity and you make a case for it and you know you have a tracker herd of delivering and you know you you get you get a shot and then it's up to you to deliver. Yeah, I love that. I want to fast forward a little bit. Something that caught my eye was your time at Converse social and and at Zoovoo pretty early into like the conversational marketing Ai, you know, conversational intelligence market, like two thousand and sixteen, two thousand and seventeen. Obviously you know I'm at going so that that caught my eye is like Mane, you were, you were early in the space. Yeah, you know, I think you know one thing that led me to my role at at Converse social is, you know, at Bronto, I after a...

...couple years of being a sales rep, I had an opportunity to move to London to be the first feed on the street and set up our first office in the UK and the really expand into Europe and I spent three years doing that and that was really life changing. You know, I met my now wife. We built that business from nothing to a twenty person team and really kind of had at a really strong foothold in that market. And then that's what led me to kind of arrive in New York and that experience of working internationally, I think, really set me up to take that first had a sales job at converse social. Yeah, in terms of the space we yeah, I like a lot of things have changed since then. You know, conver social was really applying this sort of social piece to the customer service. Use Case specifically, and that's it, okay, and then use Zoozoo, you know, then smart assistant, they've rebranded. was really about how do you take these more complex consumer buying experiences and help guide those in an online environment? Right, the stuff that you kind of need a salesperson to help you in a store, whether that's a TV or a laptop or a washing machine or something like that. Right, how do you kind of bring the human experience of question and answer to arrive at a better decision to the online experience? And so that's kind of what we were accomplishing there. But two could runs a lot of learning experience. You know, all my experience at Bronto, I knew the products so well that really set me up in my management roles as I grew there. But then stepping into a different industry, you know, a product I wasn't familiar with in a management role, that was really challenging. Right, I just didn't have all the context of how I would sell it to then kind of pass that your knowledge on to to the reps that I was managing. And that was really like a big learning moment of okay, like this is humbling. I got. I ought to learn of how to like figure this out without all the previous context. And you know, I see it's Dencil. Obviously you spent about three years, or just short of three years, the VP of sales. Just got recently, at the end of the last year, promoted to Cro so first of all, congrats on that. I think there's probably a lot of folks that...

...are parts, you know, members of pavilion listening to the podcast that are, you know, v piece of sales or head of sales that, you know, that's their goal. They want to get to the CRRO roll. So I'd love to hear as much as you're willing to share about you know, I guess how you what skills did you have to develop to kind of earn that next level? Like what did what did it take from you? Like what's the Tim as the CR row? That's different than what you know. Got Tim the VP of sales job, you know, all those years ago. Yeah, I think there's a few things. First, a shout out to pavilion. I did the crow school as a VP of sales and that open my eyes to a bunch of things. You know, I've learned a lot of better, more structured ways to approach a revenue model and the planning piece as a VP of sales and working collaboratively with, you know, my CEO or VP of finance, are VP marketing and my peers. They're another big learning from. You know, I think this was talked about in Crow School, that I think Sam says and I wrote down and have I really tried to live by it. As as you move up in the ranks of leadership, it's your team is less your direct reports in your department. Your team becomes your set of peers, so your your marketing counterpart, your finance counterpart, all of those folks, and the more that you can lean into working collaboratively on like building the company with that group like that change in mentality is a huge is a big leap to make, but it's a really impactful one, and so I think that's one of my biggest takeaways over the last couple years is learning that and applying it, and that's part of what set me up here. And the more that you can kind of think about the broader business impact and less about your department, you're going to have solutions that exist outside of sales and how that impacts the CS side of the House, how you know marketing and sales should be working together, how we feedback to product and I think just stepping into have a bigger voice into the broader strategy and other decisions that are cross departmental. Certain they help to provide that...

...experience and show that you're thinking beyond, beyond sales. I think the other thing is finding opportunities of things that don't exist and going and building it right. Like I came in running just the direct sales team. It was small at the time, but we built that up and we had a need for revenue operations. We did we didn't need and saw an opportunity for partnerships. We further built out our solutions team and bring it enablement right, and so having those things under me as vp of sales kind of shows beyond quoted, carrying a ease, the ability to manage these other functions and make it all work in harmony together to drive the business outcome. Those are certainly important to yeah, that's really interesting, the mindset shift, because you know running is a sales organ kind of creating that predictable revenue models probably something that at this point you can do. You know that like the back of your hand. You've done it at multiple orgs. But then once you're your responsibility your team is, you know the CMO or you know the chief customer officer or the head of product or whomever those people are. Any tips for folks that maybe those seem like they get you know people have different goals sometimes right and there's different difficult conversations that you might need to have where there's difference in opinion. If folks are in a situation like that, do you have any any tips for how to collaboratively handle those solutions to keep moving the company forward? I don't have a silver bullet, you know. I think one you just have to take the step to spend the time with people to understand how they operate, how they prior at eyes, what their goals are and if there's misalignment and goals. You know, those are things that need to be brought up right. You Never gonna have a kind of perfect harmony of everybody's has the same target and whatever. You kind of need to break it out in a different parts of the funnel or different parts of the business. But I think identifying opportunities to understand one another and bring alignment between those teams as a big part of how you move forward right. If you're if you're just trying to spend one on one time every week but there's there's a gap in alignment,...

...you're not going to get very far. You got to spend the time to address that. If you've identified it. You know, beyond that it's just like anything else, building a relationship, building a rapport you know, wanting to without an agenda, work with somebody to accomplish a common goal, right, and that's that's, in the end, what it comes down to with how you would work with a different organization with its product or marketing or something else. Yeah, that's great advice, Tim. I want to read something for you real quick. This is a post of yours couple weeks ago on a Thursday. Tomorrow I've got a massage booked and along overdue lunch with a friend. That's it at stend. So we've had one Friday a month off for mental health break starting last summer and it's been amazing, especially for someone with with young kids. And you go on a little bit further and that post blew up and what I think was one of the reasons maybe we connected because I came across it. I'd love to hear more about the one Friday off for month and the focus on mental health that you know stencil takes, you know, for the company I found. I think that's super interesting. Yeah, you know, we identified I think it was like spring of last year, Spring of two thousand and twenty one just, you know, it's nothing new, but like people feeling burned, burnt out or or you know, we're growing fast, we're hiring, but there's just still of seeming like more stuff, especially on top of like key people's shoulders, right. And so we decided to experiment last summer with, once a month, the Friday off for the entire company, because as much as you can encourage people to take vacation and take their time off, and we certainly do that as well, it makes a difference when the entire company is off, because then you don't have like the meetings that you're missing or the inbox flooding or a bunch of slacks waiting for you. That really tempt you, if you're like on you know, vacation or whatever, to tap into that. And so that's been really powerful. It's been really well received. So we piloted it in the summer of last year and then we decided to hey, this is really successful, we're getting positive response. We don't, you know, feel like...

...we're losing productivity. Let's keep it going, and so we've been doing it since then and, you know, I think the culture here is really about listening to people even beyond like what we're hearing directly, trying to understand where people are and how can we make Stencil or really rewarding place for people to work and build their careers. And so there's a lot of ways that we approach that, whether it's thinking about about mental health and giving that time off, whether it's about, you know, the career paths and really prioritize promoting from within and, you know, wanting people to have what I had at Bronto. You know, that six and a half your journey where you really get to stamp your career and set you up for the next the next trajectory, and a bunch of other things that we prioritize right. You know, we just had yesterday and in an internal session, you know, two of our folks who have family ties and were born and families in Ukraine and they spend a session with the company. It was optional, but a lot of people joined and they just kind of gave the history of the country, Ukraine, and and sort of a step back and provide a lot of context for what's going on there and directly from people who have, you know, lived part of that and are a part of the the Stencil, you know, culture and I was really special to me to see, while it's very cool that they have the platform to do that, and it wasn't like architected and sort of a forced thing, and they had the willingness to kind of speak up and really educate folks about what's going on. And you know, that's a hard thing to like put on a job description when you're trying to talk about the culture, but that's just an example of how we operate and is really cool to see those two women kind of present on that yesterday and and I walked away with certainly some learnings and more awareness and different perspective than I had before. Yeah, that's amazing. And maybe before we get to the rapid fires, maybe you could just for folks that aren't super familiar with Stencil, you could just give us the quick kind of rundown of what you folks do and how you serve your customers. Yeah, we are the platform for...

...collaborative email creation. So if you go and ask your marketing team, your marketing operations team about and what does it look like when you go to create just seems like a simple email asset to send out through Marquetto or Eloqua or itterabowl or whatever mark animation platform you're using. It's a very manual, time intensive process that involves a lot of hands, often a lot of html code and CSS and QA process. So we, you know, simplify, streamline out process and provide an environment where people can collaborate, versus using a bunch of disparate tools like Photoshop and dream we were and a lot of manual back and forth to get the thing done. So great companies like from mural to OCTA, to capital one, so high growth tech companies to Fortune. Fortune, five hundred companies are leveraging us to get their time back so they can focus on higher value work and in the ultimate outcomes that they're responsible for looking to achieve. Awesome. All right, tim going to hit you with a couple of rapid fires to let people know a little bit more about you. When you're ready, you want to take a deep breath, you want to have a sip of coffee. That took us take a sip of coffee up. Okay, all right. First Up, we're big learners at pavilion and for this podcast, so I'd love to know if you are a reader, if there's any books that have stood out that have have impacted you as a as a person, as a leader? Any topic is fair game, anything that stands out to you. Seven Habits of highly affective people is the number one book I recommend to folks seeking a book recommendation. seek to understand before being understood. Isn't that from there, Stephen Covey? Or No, am I am I miss did I just embarrass myself on the PODCAST BY MISS quoting? I think got my death the other I think there are of a similar era, but I seven habits is it is Stephen Covey. That might you might be right, you might be right. It might be a different it might be from a different book, though. We'll cut that out all right. I'm not sure how else you like to learn. A mushure if you're a podcast listener and you follow folks on Linkedin or youtube or newsletters or blogs...

...or anything like that, but any other form of learning that you get into that has helped you out recently. You know, I'm a big fan of Jason Limpkin. You know, I think his like bite size takeaways of how to build a business and how to look around corners and some of the data that he shares about, you know, looking at companies at certain stages, especially at, you know, IPO. I find that stuff super interesting and helpful. And Yeah, really, you know, really into a lot of the stuff that he puts out there. Do you tend to follow what he says on Linkedin or twitter, or is actual blog? I'm just curious. Not a big twitter guy. So, y'all, I'll look at him on Linkedin. Watch a fair amount of youtube videos, like I'm an audio visual learner, so I also like to see the sort of video segments that he does too. Okay, yeah, I mean he's the goat of the SASS world, no doubt about it. Tim What goes on in the headphones? Music Wise, spotify or Apple Music? Like, what are you? What do you listening too? It's going to be you look at my own repeats, it's everything from chief Keif to and Conto to like throwback to stuff I listen to in high school, like taking back Sunday. I'm all over the place, but in content, I got a I have two girls. I've got a five year old and almost too, so and caught the entire and conto soundtrack plays in our house every single day, every single day. The chief Keith to in Conto to taking back Sunday, is a wide it's a wide variance. It's bizarre for sure. Obviously one thing that pavilion folcus is on is community and networking. Would love to hear your number one professional networking tip. Networking tip this is this isn't going to be a short answer, but you know, I'm a big believer and you know I work with a professional coach, like a leadership executive coach, and a big part of what I've been working on there is just about creating a vision and visioning and really sort of putting out on paper and into the world like what you're what's important to you and what you're searching for and I think, being very you know,...

...put it understanding what you're looking to get out of things, that they will start to pop up right. You know, I remember I was like I kind of only want to like angel investing. The be cool to dabble in and it was one of my first revenue collective. You obviously now pavilion dinners and I sought sat next to Max from outreach and then, you know, we got connected, me to get chat and then later you know, probably a year later I see he's starting GTM fund and I'm and I was like that's that's exactly what I want to be a part of. That's how I envision, like do, being angel investing. That's really cool. So it got in touch with him showing GTM fund for the very start of it. You January last year, and yeah, I don't know. Just like my lesson there is be intentional about you know what's important to you and what are you interested in, and start to look for those opportunities and they will present themselves and then you just got to act on them. That's such great advice. There's really something powerful about saying you're speaking it out, like what what it is that you want? If it's a new job, if it's you're hiring you in this case, you want to get into angel investing. If you didn't actually say that, you know, would backs have hit you up proactively? Maybe, maybe not. It's probably more likely that he wouldn't have because he wouldn't have known that that's something that you're interested in. I'd so I think that is stellar advice for people of wherever they are in their careers or whatever they're interested in. Yeah, it applies to all parts of life. You know, I have a have goals for you know this this quarter that aren't related to revenue. It's you know, I want to do unique activities with my girls that just like aren't the day to day, week to week. And how do I create unique memories? Right, and you kind of keep track of it, right, you'll sledding, your bowling, you try new things and you know, I've got a goal for six, six for q one, and I've already already hit that. I'm on past exceeding que. Isn't it funny how us, the sales people and sales leaders, like ten to map out like our personal our personal goes like, yeah, I'm on, I hit my quota. You know, I'm on, tracted it or exceed. It's just funny the Verbius that we use, as I do the same thing. You know, you operate a certain way and it doesn't, you know, starter stop only with work. And so if...

...you can take the things that work for you in your career and apply them to your personal life, because a lot of people, myself included, get so focused on the career and then you forget to be intentional and we have goals to sort of build that future, in that vision in your personal life that you do for your career, and so that's a big thing I'm working on really over the past couple of years and continue to work on, is how do I bring that same, you know, tenacity and approach and passion and proactiveness and setting goals and hitting them into into my personal life, because that's that's the most important thing, right, and often it gets you just kind of float on a little better, it gets kind of pushed the back burner, but it actually should be front center. Yeah, I absolutely agree. All right, Tim who is one person in your network that you'd like to see come on to this podcast next? You know, I had to hit you with that referral someone who I'm spending more time with here at Stencil who I think is just an absolute rock stars nine a GTM function, Natalie Rass. She's she leads our people ops function, but so much of people are like we work really well together and really see these things as intertwined versus separate departments, and I think that could be a unique perspective, right, not just sales or marketing or CS, but you know, how does people ops kind of fit into all this. I think Natalie be a fantastic person to have on awesome Tim before I let you go, I know that you folks at stens are hiring, you know, a boatload of people in some really key executive hires that you're looking to make in the next few weeks or months. So I'd love for you to just elaborate on that and then also let folks know if they want to reach out to if they want to connect with you, where's the best place to do that? Yeah, some really exciting roles that are they're open. Vp of customer success role is open, so to be overseeing our entire post sale function, so support services the CSM team. We've got a VP of sales roll open, so this would be overseeing our direct sales team. So both are commercial and enterprise functions. Ahead of partnerships. Isn't live yet. By the time that says released, that will be open and live. A leader for SDR, so sales development leader...

...as well, and then, of course a's, both commercial enterprise CSM's strs. Were always hiring for those as well, and you can find man Linkedin Tim Doris to ours as a good place to connect with me. Send me a message and if you know somebody and a player, you know that's a we have an awesome group of people and then awesome people attract other amazing talent and it just builds on itself and that's something we're really proud of here at stuncil. And you know, I think the difference maker of companies that really make it and and have a big impact versus companies such as sort of physical out yeah, absolutely, Tim, I appreciate you coming on. Everyone definitely go check out the roles. CHECK OUT TIM on Linkedin shooting a connection request and Tim, thanks for coming on. Man, this is great, Tom. Thank you really enjoyed appreciate it. Thanks, G for checking out that episode. This was brought to you by outreach, the only company that offers sales engagement, revenue intelligence and revenue operations together in one platform. Outreach helps teams prospect more efficiently, practively fixed deal risks and, when more predictably, discover how you can prove your sales execution at every stage of the sales cycle. By visiting outreach dot I am.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (262)