The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 5 months ago

Ep 214: Rob Consoli, CRO at Skuid Talks About Building A Strong Sales Culture

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 214: Rob Consoli, CRO at Skuid Talks About Building A Strong Sales Culture

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Welcome back to the pavilion podcast, where revenue leaders learned the tips, tricks and tactics they need to be successful in their roles. I'm your host, Tom Alemo. Thank God it's Monday. Let's go. I've got robbed can solely here on the line. He is the chief revenue officer over at Squid. Formerly ran VP, was the VP of America's over at open text, is that liaison technologies, ID systems sap. He's been all over. He's held vp and C sweet titles at a lot of different companies. Super seasoned leader in the space and we had a crank conversation. I've been podcasting for a while, almost five years, and we had a really good conversation, both recorded that you'll hear and then post recording. That just really speaks to the type of person that rob is and what he's talks about being a people focus leader and how important that is to him and how he talks to talk and he walks the walk and I think you're really going to enjoy this one. If you are leading a team aspire to lead a team, this is going to be a great one for you. Think you're going to learn a lot. So we're going to get a quick word from our sponsor and then we'll get straight into the interview. All right, this month your episodes are brought to you by Dochabo, an award winning industry leader and trusted enterprise learning partner for more than two thousand of the world's best brands. Now let's get into our episode. All right, coming out at of Atlanta, we got robbed Consoley on the podcast. Good Morning, rob how are you? I'm doing well of the morning, excited to excited to have you on and chat about all things sales, sales culture, leadership and and see where this one goes. So thanks for joining. I'm happy to be here. You flip the the turntables on me a little bit before we started recording, asking about how I got into sales and everything like that. My cut go backgrounds. I'd love to, now that we've got the recorder, go and flip it on you and hear how you got into sales and how that whole career started. Yeah, first of all, I love the cut background. Will leave that right there, but that is phenomenal start. I did not start my career cut cut. I'm actually an aerospace engineer by degree. So a true rocket scientist, if you will. I started my career out and forward Texas. Got To work on various programs, including the F sixteen, the Joint Strike Fighter, the F twenty two, national aerospace playing eight hundred and twelve program etc. My team was helping predict the performance of these air aircraft and helping design them as well. So it's pretty pretty exciting job. It took me all over the world. But to answer your question specifically, how did I get into sales with an engineering background? Well, I got to travel around with the sales teams that were selling us in Indonesia, Japan, Singapore, and it really happened my eyes to what might be beyond my engineering role. Wow. So what was it about that role, like when you're traveling...

...with the sales team? Like what would intrigue you about sales? I think there are a few things overall. I mean I loved learning about other companies and what was kind of going on across the world and Globe and I just had to a quest for knowledge to learn more about that. But I also saw these salespeople in action, listening to their clients, understanding what their business requirements are, being able to respond in ways that would help move the sale along. Just learning some great principles about understanding that if our customers get what they want, we actually get what we want. We reverse that order and put our own needs ahead of our customers, it's usually not going to work out well. I always think of sales as some combination of art and science. It's probably not fifty and it's probably different for everyone, but I have to imagine you're probably more on the science row just from the engineering background and how your brain operates. I think that's fair. I mean, most people would describe my personality as even Keel Right. I don't don't get too excitable. I'm very process centric, which makes me a good sales leader, meaning having a defined, repeatable sales process helps propelled companies to success and sales teams to success. So it's funny that you say that, because I do believe it as a combination of both art and science together. Yeah, that's a comment like if I had to define one word, that by director at Gong said that you know last year and a bunch of our team meetings it was it was repeatables, repeatable and or scalable. That came up every single meeting. Like how do we make this process more eatable and how do we scale it so it's someone that's done that frequently, like, do you have thoughts or tips on when you go into a situation and how you can create a process more repeatably? If how you kind of think about that? Yeah, I mean a lot of sales leaders get asked the question now, is there a particular sales methodology or process that you like, that you adhere to? And and my answer surprises them sometimes, which is, you know, there's many, I've done them all. Spin selling, strategic selling, complex sale, etc. My mindset is, you know, pick one and stick with it. You know, they all have the same kind of fundamental principles etc. But make sure that your teams are using them and adhering to them. More importantly, though, there are five attributes that I look for when I'm hiring the sales team. And again, I've been at this now and sales and sales leadership roles forever, twenty five years, so I've seen the good bat in the ugly. But there's five attributes that I look for when I'm hiring sales people. First, which doesn't surprise people, is integrity. Integrity is buying here. I'm looking for people that are truth tellers, that are men and women of integrity that want to do the right thing every time. I find that one attribute and building a sales team, to be the differentiator. I'm not looking for people that have to twist the truth or manipulate their customers to get a sale. Not Interested. The second thing I look for, and it may be because of my engineering background, I look for intellect. I looked for people that know their stuff. In fact, by design where I am today, our ratio of sale people two pre sales engineers is...

...almost for two one, meaning we have one pre sales engineer support for for sales people. Why? Because I want them to be able to do their own demos. I want them to be technically astuted about what we're selling. That's gives me competitive advantage. The third attribute I look for people that are self starters. They're people that know how to run their day. They don't need to be micro managed. They own their own success. They can propel themselves forward. The next thing I look for is strong work ethics, of people that know how to work hard and when to work hard. I live for people that have strong work family balance as well, so when they're at work, they're working there, as I say, they're not cheating their family by not doing their work at work or surfing than that or doing things that are not productive and contributing to their selling. And then filing the fifth attribute, I look for people at our team players, you know, for me I would call it servant leadership, people that are willing to help others be successful and succeed in their organization. And those five attributes are what I look for and hiring and forming a team and that's been propelled prevailing my team in my company and other companies I work for to their success. Does that make sense? Yeah, it's. I'm curious, like you've got that dialed in. I mean you know that like the back of your hand. So how longing did it take you to come up with that list and how is that of all pet of overtut you know, it's funny. I mean I was reflecting back, you know, as I've built sales teams and maybe in a few minutes we can talk a little bit about my career, but reflecting back on you know what what made our successful. The last company I was with was there for eight years. Rose, who grew up into the chief avenue officer roll. We sold the company. Started there we were about twenty million dollars, rose it to over a hundred million, sold it for over three hundred million to a four billion dollar company. I mean that that's a success story and once you go through the gauntlet of doing something that like that, you reflect back and go what were the attributes? What were the things that made that successful? And in those five attributes emerged from them. It's very I have to imagine that one of the books that you either have read or probably like has to be sales acceleration formula, just because of the Engineering Mindset of Marco bears and I just know that it's a book I've read. It's trying to get ready to be a sales leader and he talks about, I think in the first chapter, like the attributes that he looks for and sales people, and it's not, I don't think it's these five, but there's definitely some crossover there and that definitely just gotta struck a chord with me. Yeah, for sure. You know there's a that that intangible. You mentioned art and science, right, and we we all know the salespeople that have been consistent performers year after year and no matter what company they go to or what role or what book of business they get, they can continue to hit their number over and over again. And they they've got that last attribute, which is that fire in the belly right there. They're willing to do whatever it takes to make the company successful or to get that sale or to work with that customer make them successful. But at the end of the day all falls back in those five characteristics I mentioned. You mentioned servant leadership and that was something that I wanted to pick up because I noticed that you put that...

...in your Linkedin Bios. You one of the first ways that you described yourself. What does I think? That's a term we've all heard, but maybe it means something a little bit different to some people. What does that mean to you? Servant Leadership? Yeah, great question. I mean for me it means that I'm willing to roll my slaves up and do something that I would ask my team to do, really jump in the pond or jump in the water and help them be successful. So you know, whether they need help with a contract or they need help with a sale strategy or they need help putting a sales deck together. You know, despite my role, there's nothing that's above me that I wouldn't do to help my team be successful, and that leadership atribute. In fact, you know, I want to cultivate, and have cultivated, a culture of US really caring for each other, not just talking about it, but genuinely caring for each other in our organization, and we have a pretty unique company here at squid. It has to be one of the Best Company cultures I've ever been with in the past. It starts with our leadership and, just you our empathy, in our care and concern. One of our key attributes for our companies, or is that we're caring heroes in a way, right. So, overall, so it starts at the top, but I'll give you a couple tangible examples of what that looks like. You know, the fact of the matter is, if you spend enough time with anyone in an organization, you know they're either coming out of a tough time, going into a tough time or maybe in a tough time, and when you pause long enough to genuinely care about that person in that individual, wow it means the world. We've been on the other side of that we've received that kind of care and empathy, and so has a servant leader. I want to not just care about a quota and a target and what we're accomplishing, but I want to care about each individual on my team, and particularly where I am today, squid, our executive leadership team has that level of care and concern and empathy and our entire company really has that care and concerning empathy, for example, we have a monthly sales call every month. We'll have one next week. We usually do it the first week of every month and I'll pick three people in my organization that can tell their story and so they've got a slide or two or how room, and they want, they can put whatever pictures or background or things that bring them joy on those slides and I got to tell you it's the most important part of our monthly sales call that we do and the team loves it and we've learned so much about each other outside of work that it draws everyone together like we're in this fighter, in this battle together to be successful. So it's been really fun, it's been really rewarding. Yeah, I feel like you know, sales is such an interesting profession. When we think about teams because in some regards you know how your teammate performs. If you're a sales rep, in reality, doesn't really make a difference on how successful you are on paper or how much money you make or what your commission is going to be or anything like that. But when you do, when you are part of a company that the team is truly a team and helps each other, I think it's rare, but it can really it's just a has a special environment to be a part of and it lifts everyone up and everyone's being successful...

...and everyone's helping each other out and cares about each other. You can really kind of feel that and I've been a part of a few of those teams that have been a part of a few teams that are the opposite of that, because for the palpable difference between between how that feels, how do you, how does a leader that works under you, how do you either, you know, kind of vet that in the hiring process or and or coach them when they come under you to like you make sure that they are kind of like showing that as part of their team and building that type of culture, because it's really hard to do. Yeah, I think you're right. It is hard to do. And you know what I learned is it really starts from day one. So even when I'm interviewing or communicating with a potential prospect or someone that we're going to hire, I'm going to be my authentic, full self to that person. You know, I don't have to hide behind a tile or hide behind my accomplishments or anything else. I want to bring my full self to that discussion so that that person feels comfortable enough to let their walls down and let me see their true self and who they are. And when we can find those kind of people that are willing to do that, we can look for those five attributes and make sure that we've got got the right people on board. I think if you talk to my leadership team, you would find that this is not just a job that you know, this is a place where they can be their true, authentic self that I'm rallying behind them. Like you could talk to my leaders about my biggest accomplishment would be to help one of my leaders become a chief revenue officer in a company someday. I'm constantly thinking about, you know, their career and how I can help them get to the next level line because they've got families, they've got career past, they've got goals and ambition. So I've learned. You know, making it about me is much less interesting than making it about other people and about their success and I really thrive on that. So yeah, and I think you know it's it's we mentioned this before the call that I think sales has changed probably more than the last two years than in the five or ten or however many before that, just with covid and every everything or most things being virtual. Has that? Has that changed in how you vet out some of these five attributes, because I imagine you just get a different feel for people when you're in when you're in person with them right you can kind of get a sense for what type of person they are and you can read their body language better and you can see how they're acting in the waiting room or you know how they treat the you know, receptionist or, I don't know where, all those different things and you just don't really get that or you get maybe different inputs on a zoom. So I'm just curious you. Have you found like new ways to kind of vet some of these out, or do you feel like, Hey, I have these these questions, I have these kind of ways that I can judge and I have, you know, good Eq to understand that and it's been consistent. Yeah, I think you're right. I think the the Eq is important and a good sixth sense, as you will but you know, I think backs like two years ago and we're all, you know, thrown in this post covid world and you know, we're on zoom calls and stuff. I mean I hated it. I missed the interaction of being in an office and being around other people. But you know, we've gotten very good at it. There's...

...other things that we can talk about that have made that more palpable than than in the past, in the early, early days of this two year venture. But very comfortable now being on camera, very comfortable engaging people on zoom calls and on video calls, etc. And asking the questions and paying attention to, you know, I. Movement and their body language and how they respond and aren't, you know, are they actually engaged in the conversation over all? So I think we've learned how to adapt and compensate for for not being in person. But all that being said, I'm sure like you. I I thrive and I desire to have that community right and to be around other people, and so we're making the most of that. And now that the world's kind of opening back up again, you know, we're starting to travel more and be together offices and have different meetings and it feels so good to be back right, so good to be back in among other people again. Yeah, for sure. I'd love to get tactical with you for a minute about something you brought up earlier around sales reps to sales engineers. I think you said you had one undo four ratio, or I guess four to one sales reps to to engineers, if I'm understanding I don't know much about your space that you sell, and it sounds like that's a differentiation for you all. I know a lot of you know friends of mine that sell really technical products. They have a one to one with a sales engineer and they even say, Hey, you know, I know how to sell, but I don't even know. I don't know a lot of INS and outs of my product. You know, I let the sales engineer take that. That's that they tell me. So I'm just curious that. I'd love for you to explain that a little bit more for any folks that are in a more technical sale just kind of like your philosophy behind opting for reps that are more intelligent about the product or the market versus relying on just more more sales engineers to kind of handle that. Look, yeah, look, I mean, at the end of the day, I think that the high tech sales career is perhaps one of the most lucrative and beneficial careers that we can have. You know, we can have the income of doctors and lawyers and other professionals, right. So the that comes with that comes with the cost. In my opinion, if you're going to be the very best at what you can be in this high technology sales landscape, you need to know the technology that you're selling. If you've ever said in a sales meeting, Hey, I'm not the technical person or I don't always have all the answers or my guys going to answer those questions, if someone says that in a meeting that I'm in, that works for me, they're going to get a reprimand because you've just taken yourself out of the conversation. You've just eliminated any credibility that you have whatsoever. What I'd prefer you to do is to study the technology and understand what we sell and get very good at objection handling and over overcoming customer and prospects questions and when you don't know the answer, just say, Hey, that's a great question. I will get back with you this afternoon on that and just be honest with them about it. But I want them to be experts of what we're selling and I've sold much more complex technology than then what squid cells today overall. So you know, I don't I'd like to say it's not rocket science. It's not, but I've got a very competent...

...team. We do regularly monthly technical trainings, what I call a talking tech session, to continue to acclimate them and give them additional information so they can become experts in by the way, those salespeople that have the strong technical background and have the knowledge and they continue to gain that knowledge, they will go on to be some of the most successful salespeople in the end in the industry because they can do it. And so why not differentiate yourself and make that investment? Yeah, it kind of takes a way that you know every salesperson or good salesperson wants to be that trusted advisor, you know, to to a customer and a prospect. And I do feel like, depending on what you're selling, there's, you know, spectrum of complexity. But if you're not able to handle the wherever you are, it does take a little bit of that advisor Space Away and then it brings it to you know, it just kind of feel opens the gap for AK potential competitor. And if you're against them, and a lot of things seem similar, but the salesperson on their side just like can truly understand it and explain it to them and, you know, relate to them on that technical level. At least to me, it feels like your you might lose the deal because you don't get that advisor status and you don't have that same level of trust that's built up right and if you bridge that trust because you're answered a question that you perhaps didn't know the answer to and answered it incorrectly, and then you know you've tarnished your reputation from the onset. Look, I've sat in many, many ceio offices and fortune one hundred and five hundred companies and I'm able to go toe to toe with the C Sea Hio and challenge them about their architecture, their plans or what have you. I mean it's it's great knowledge and great, great credibility. It just, you know, help smooth things along. So how do you feel like that has served you? You know, staying, maybe not in the same industry, but at least, it seems like, with the same buyer. Like it doesn't seem like you're you also sold a lot to see rows and CMOS and, you know, HR leaders. How do you feel like? I don't know if that's been strategic or just kind of been like where your interests have been and you've found good companies to follow, but do you feel like that's been a strategic Lens and how it impacted you positively to stay kind of in the same at least in the same buy or persona for your career? Yeah, I mean to some degree. I mean I've sold to all different percentage but I have stayed in information technology and application development for the past thirty or so years. So I'm become an expert and that particular area. Now, that doesn't mean that I can buy the way we sell today to revenue and sales leaders. We sell to customer and operations leaders and we sell to people operations leaders as well. Right, so I'm having conversations with other personas and can have those tangible conversations with with them as well. Yeah, I mean again, just invest in yourself and continue to understand and learn the technology that you're selling and, more importantly, you know the value proposition. You got to put yourself in the buyers shoes. What does it mean to them? How is their life going to be impacted? What does a wind look like from their perspective? You know, I try to put myself in their shoes and look at, you know, what...

...my technology are, my solution offers them. Yeah, and while we're here, before we get to some rapid fires, maybe you can just educate US per minute or two on exactly what squid does and high server customers. Yeah, sure, absolutely so. Squid is a company that's based in chatting, in Tennessee, where almost a decade hold. But we're solving a problem that really is plagued all applications that are in the market place today, is, which is providing a very beautiful, bespoke user interface. Most applications that people use today they don't want to use their difficult or cumbersome. Look at some of the technologies out of the box, like sales force, People Soft Work Day, to Leo and others. Those applications out of the box really don't provide what companies need to run their business. So what ends up happening as you have to hire teams of developers to go build those applications and ways that make the meaningful and useful. And Squid is a lowcoat tool kit that allows not even developers can use it, but even people that don't have a development background to build very beautiful applications that are purpose built for their specific needs. Overall, we've been doing that for the better part of the last decade and sales force and more recently, with an acquisition that we made of a company called in flight, we've now taken that technology into other platforms. Like I mentioned people, Soft Work Day, success factors to lay out. We can literally sit on just about any application framework and give that user a better experience. I love it. One thing before we get to the rapid fire. You mentioned the acquisition. When you think about acquiring companies as a crow, and there's still much that needs to get done I'm sure from a people perspective, a culture attack. What it what comes to minor use like the most important thing that needs to get done or maybe even the most challenging thing that needs to happen. Well, there's a lot that has to be done. I mean, unfortunately I've got a lot of experience and acquisitions. We made seven at my last company will propel our growth about half organic growth and half growth through acquisition. So you know from all fast as the organization organization, that that the technology platforms need to come together. For example, those sales force instances need to come together as well, right and get everything into one system. Again, squid is a product that is designed to access multiple sales force organization. So really out of the gate we can provide a cohesive common interface across those two spare platforms. But that's usually one. The people integrations another challenge to write. Where do these people that you're acquiring? Where do they fit into your organization? And sometimes they don't all fit and we try to make them work and give them opportunities and so forth. But my experience is that they'll be some portion of the folks that come over that they'll decide this is not for them or, you know, not the right rule or responsibility. We want to minimize that as much as possible. We do that by interviewing and understanding what their goals and expectations are. We're fully integrated. We're three weeks and we fully integrate our sales teams into one, into one organization right now, which is exciting. We've got some talent. The other...

...thing that's really cool about inflight and fun when you do an acquisition is you want to assess that culture. Is it a cultural effit? And we're a perfect match together. The curing hero, the empathy that we have. It's good. Is the same that they've built their in flight company on in their customer base and relationships. So it's been a great marriage so far and we're excited about what the future brings. That's awesome. All Right, let me hit you with a couple rapid fires, rob so people can get to know you a little bit better. First and foremost, we're big learners on the PODCAST, so I'd love to hear you know we mentioned it a few at least one book earlier, but if you are a reader, I'd love to hear any books that have helped you as a as a leader, as a person. Any topic is fair game, but curs if there's any that stand out or anything you reading now? Yeah, I've got I've got plenty of bookshelves and now building my online library as well. But I have to say, just from a personal standpoint, probably the book that's had the biggest impact on my life as a book called Grace Slop by Stephen McVeigh. You know, I'll just leave that there, but it's a really understanding the grace that we live in and kind of who we are as individuals and hugely impactful and I've I've shared that book with dozens of people that have also said their life is impacted. From a sales perspective, I think one of my favorite book is new strategic selling by Miller hyman. I mean it's just, you know, it's for people that are trying to get themselves acclimated to sales. It's all the principles that we need to learn. You know, for example, what are the four types of buyers that we have in every sales cycle? You know, how do you leverage red flags into opportunities? Just such great nuggets in there and you can take that knowledge and morphit into, you know, other sales methodologies that are out there, like challenger sales, etc. But get the fundamentals down overall. So I love reading and I love the quest for knowledge and continue to just learn about things I don't know anything about. I love it. I'll have to check out grace bok. Had not heard that one yet. I don't know if you learn through podcasts or blogs or newsletters or youtube or anything else like that, but any any other or linked in any other platforms or people that you follow on any of those types of mediums that have stood out to you recently? Well, I got to tell you I'm very impressed with pavilion overall and just the wealth of knowledge and no matter what background or experience or title you have, just your tremendous resource. So we've expanded our use of the pavilion platform beyond just a couple people in the organization to other leaders that we have. Overall. I'm always in a quest for knowledge and so various news sources that I use and Linkedin. I've actually gotten off the most social media, facebooks and the snapchats and the others, just because I didn't find those things to be productive in my life personally, and so I'm really investing my time and things that I can actually get good benefit from and learn from. Other other platforms. I would say probably Linkedin is with one of my favorites. Yeah, I've gone cold Turkey on every social media other than Linkedin and I guess Youtube if you count that, but off of instagram and twitter and all that in the last month or...

...two and it's life changing. Honestly, I don't know if I don't know if I'll ever go back. It's just such a huge time suck and I think overall, and I'm you know, I do miss, you know, sharing photos with family and friends in those kinds of things, but we just do it outside of outside of this platforms. Today it's been it's certainly giving me more time in my life, for sure. Yeah, yeah, it feels like you're working with twenty six hours in a day at first. So obviously pavilion is, you know, a community where folks are trying to learn and network and all these different things. What's your number one networking tip? Number one networking tip, I think overall, is to be authentic and be genuine and all of your interactions that you have certainly don't just blast emails or Linkedin in meals to people that are not personalized. Take the time, till my sales seeing this, to take the time to understand who your buyer is and try to connect with them at a personal level. I think in this post covid world that we're in right now, that is probably the best way. Like, for example. I mean I get lots of emails from companies that want to do business with me, but if they're not personalizing that message to me and it's just a form email, first of all it's ninety percent of those are going to go to spam anyway, but the ones that slip through and make it to my inbox, I'm not going to read them. If you take the time to say hey on Itistre in Auburn Grad or you went to Smu and Dallas Texas and got your masters, or hey, you're thinking about the the Auburn Tennessee game that's coming up this weekend, I'm going to take time to listen. Why? Because you took time to do some homework and who I am overall, and I think that's so important. At the end of the day, we just need to treat people the way we want to be treated and I want to treat people with kindness, with empathy, with interest, with my attention. So don't just gloss over these spam emails and and you know these cadences that are just normalized. They're not going to pay off. You're just wasting your time their vanity metrics. At the end of the day, you just say that you sent twozo emails in a week, but what did you actually get free to that? Probably little to nothing. Take time to really care about somebody. That's powerful. I got a couple more for you, rob what is going on in the headphones music wise nowadays, on spotify or wherever you tune in? Yeah, that's that's funny. You should say that I got great solace during covid by riding my bike vertually every morning. So on a good day I'll be out riding, you know, twenty miles a day during the week, forty two, sixty miles on the weekends, and so that playlist that I have is hugely important. Listening to podcast and stuff, that's the time at which I pick up things that I want to want to learn more about. I happen to listen to a lot of Christian and worship music. I love s rock and roll, so I have a whole repertoire things that I listened to that just motivate me. By the way, last year I put in over two thousand seven hundred miles on my bike last year. So they us so and it's just headspace, like I got to get out from behind this desk in this computer...

...and just get out into nature and not have my phone ringing and email and text to respond to, but just get a level of sid and if I can do that every day, I'm in a good place. Yeah, I feel the same way about running. It's just that it's as good for your soul, I feel like, in your mind as it is for your body to get out and get the blood movement and especially if you do it outside, is just a different feel to it. Absolutely I love it. Okay, let me see anything else we got. Well, I've got to ask you before we head off. Who would you want to see come next on the pavilion podcast? Gosh, that's a great question. Yeah, I mean we have some vendors that we that we do some some great business with that I think we'd be phenomenal for you guys to have on there's some interesting technology out there that we've been looking out and playing with. One of them is a technology called autobound. It's helping us do exactly what I mentioned earlier, which is to get triggers about companies that we want to do business with, but also get that inside information about that person individual so that we can connect with them personally, and I would love for you to have their CEO of that company and Co founder of autobound, Daniel Weiner, on a call with you. He's a great guy, by the way. I got to meet him hero and Atlanta. We just connected. We have share a lot, a lot of shared interests and likes, just in terms of treating people and building a company, but I think you'd be a phenomenal person to have on your podcasts. That's great. My second to last question for you any tech that you've used personally, whether it's in your personal or professional life, that you picked up recently that that's made it a difference or something that you're kind of inspecting and checking out? Anything that's like top of mine for you make it more productive or I don't know you anything like that that stands out, or maybe you're a low tech type of guy. No, no, I'm definitely a high tech kind of guy and I'm very biased. I'm a huge apple fan, so everything that is is apple. You know, I just try to automate the things that I can automate. My whole home is automated with that Apple Home Kit and we made devices and things like that, so I just have fun with it. I've got apple home pods throughout my house to stream my music, like things like that might if you looked at my phone, is an engineer. It's incredibly organized. I got all my apps exactly where I need them. When I ride my bike, I get, you know, my heart rate and my distance and how does this compared to my last ride? I'm a huge tecky. Yeah, okay, I like to use like a whooper Straw or something like you stram. Oh, yeah, I'm not strong. Yeah, okay, Nice. That's what I use for running. Sweet. Well, Rab I precate you coming on. Before let you go, can you let people know the best place to connect with you if they want to learn more from you, if they're interested in working with squid or working at squid? Maybe could just let us know at the best places to to learn more about that and to reach out to you. Yeah, thank you. I'm and not love to be connected with you on Linkedin, so please reach out to me. I'm under ROB consolate, rob...

...see how and Soli. I think my linkedin handle is Robert consolely and Linkedin. Also, squid is. SKU ID stands for a software kit user interface design. So there's actually a name. People pronounce it squid because that's what it sounds like. And we're just at squidcom again, a great company, Great Technology where we've had just unprecedented growth and success in the marketplace. We'd love to have a conversation with you, if you're a sales or revenue OPS leader or people ops leader or customer success operations leader, about how we can improve the life of your team with beautiful applications on the platforms you're currently using. Awesome. Yeah, we're definitely go check out squid. Hit Rob up on Linkedin connect with them and rob. Thanks for joining us. Is Great. I had so much fun here. Thanks for having me today and look forward to continue to see just the great things of pavilions doing. Yeah, thanks rob. All right, take care. All Right, folks, this episode was brought to you by do Chebo. No, Chebo is redefining the future of enterprise learning with its AI based learning suite. With Dochebo, you can create and manage engaging content, the liver training to customers, partners or employees and measure how learning impacts your people in your business, all with a single suite. Find your learning and development sweet spot at Doch ABOCOM. Thank you for listening to this episode. Feel free to give me some feedback on Linkedin. My name is Tom Alamo. Hit subscribe and until next week, get after it, y'all. Pose.

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