The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 20: Selling Your Company and Starting anew During a Pandemic feat Al Torres

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 20: Selling Your Company and Starting anew During a Pandemic feat Al Torres

Hi and welcome to the revenue collective podcast. I'm Casey let Gordon, your host. Today's episode with Al Torres, the vice president of revenue and partnerships per suayable, is brought to you by Sindoso. Sindoso, the leading sending platform, is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey. By connecting digital and physical strategies, companies can engage, require and retain customers easier than ever before. Thank you, Sendoso, and let's jump in without all right, crew, hello revenue collective. This is Casey let Gordon, as Sam has dubbed Me Klg, your new host for the revenue collective podcast. I am excited to sit down today with my guest, Al Torres. Al Is the current Vice President of revenue and partnerships at Suayable, a global research platform for testing consumer impact for creative ads. And while we will talk about swayable and AL's journey to starting a new gig in the midst of a pandemic, we're going to start a little earlier in Ol story of when he found it in sold a company during a pandemic. So for any of you living that startup life, that founder life, and adjusting to the world in in remote and pandemic life, I think this will be an interesting talk. How thank you for joining me today. Okcy, pleasure, pleasure to be here with you today. Really excited to have this conversation met to me too, and so at you and I met. You and I met a couple months ago and it's been interesting through my transition of leaving a full time job and taking some time off and then you taking some time off going into a full time Gig. So it's been interesting parallel and I've so enjoyed any of our conversations we've had over the past couple months and getting to know each other. Yeah, it's been a pleasure, it really has. And this two and twenty has been an interesting year to say the least. I think a little bit crazy, and I'm predictable across the board. So you know the the craziness kind of stories individually continue, but I think mine's probably somewhat unique. And last minute I was the founder of a company called summit, saying the sales enablement software from marketers. So really what we were was the ability to track event Roi from meetings at trade chosen conferences. We had started the business about five plus years ago, a cofounder of myself, and we've gone through kind of all the trials and tribulations of a startup. So you know, I would say once a year we thought that we wouldn't be able either do a fund raise or we were going to get paid on time in order to meet pay roll or that, you know, we the systems were to be able to hit a certain deadline for a certain client. So throughout the is stressful kind of five and a half years, by the end of by mid of last year, we really started hitting our stride and we had acquired a lot of enterprise business, specifically companies like an Amazon, Docu sign spotify, and we were really kind of hitting our our headway there and we decided, you know, where we were in the midst of deciding whether we go and raise a series be around the funding we had done six point six million through a series day at that point, or should we look at a potential acquisition, since we had already kind of gone some some light interest, and so the mid two thousand and nineteen was kind of an interesting tipping point for us. Yeah, I I love that. So let's dig into a little bit of this here. So five years ago you and your business partner start this business and see, you know, see growth. You've gone through series a, you're coming into late two thousand and nineteen, right, you're hitting your stride, winning these big accounts. I think any of those names would make any organization, much less a start up, pretty happy. You know that the Amazon's, the spotify is of the world, but that's pretty incredible. So then,...

...was it a matter of just your own you know, building a companies exhausting, certainly, five years in a company. Was it your own journey? That said, let's start looking at what the next option is, of whether it's selling or acquiring or where. There are other factors at play and I think, you know, we can certainly dig into to what those look like in a startup world. Yeah, for sure, it was a little bit of combination of everything right. So throughout, I think when you start the business there's maybe the the massively optimistic internal viewpoint that you know one day this is going to grow into a billion dollar business and maybe go public. If you if you kind of have that general thought of being shooting for the stars. But you know, when you're really starting, you start taking invest in money, you realize they're kind of really are two options that potentially going in public one day if you grow to that level, but more likely in today's world of a technology start up at least, acquisition is probably the more, you know, realistic option. Arguably, you know, just running a small business that has a normal trajectory of growth is a possibility. But if you take money, typically that investment comes with, you know, speed and agility to get a higher return that money. So if you take investment, likely to acquisition is probably one of your main kind of targets at some point down the road. So we knew that. We knew that the conversations I mentors with our investors, but prior to taking money, and so we knew that at some point down the road that was something that we would likely can kind of consider. And the question is always when. Do you have enough product market fit? Do you have enough revenue to show interest? Do you have enough strategic value? Have you built the right team? kind of all the different reasons why someone a larger business will buy a smaller business. You know revenue is one of the key ones and probably one of your main metrics, but it's typically not the only one. Right, it's to be some level of innovation, the technology G it is, you know, acquisition for talent, the way of thinking about something where your product that arguably could be inferior to a larger product but is still taking market share because of its approach or the way that it's built or some other reason. Right. So we always had that in the back of our mind that acquisition was a likely option for us. What twenty nine team brought was, I think, more of the kind of the the story, you know blogs or podcasts that you hear about how alignment with investors started to kind of diverge and when we were looking to understand whether we want to continue fundraising or look at an acquisition, dealing with some of our investors that had some discrepancies of the way that we looked at the world, the way that we wanted to kind of fundraise going forward for the success of the business, started to missalign and luckily my partner I had enough ownership of the business where we were still kind of able to steer it in the direction that we wanted for the most part, and so we started to say, Hey, let's look at what an acquisition really look like. So we went out to the market. I want I want to ask the question real quick before we get into the story of what was next. I want to understood and as you're able to share right, I recognized that their sensitively always, but can you share anything about that misalignment and what that journey was like when you started to realize it, how you and your partner had those conversations? I mean, this is great, this is like your blood, sweat and tears into building your company, and I'm sure it was emotional. It was personal as much as it was business, and so curious of what that felt like on the other side. Yeah, it was. It was all those things you know when you when you talk about Miss Alignement, I think there is. Some people say that you know all money screen and if it's on your terms, that might be the case, but if it's on anyone else's terms, which usually for a startup that's taking investment dollars, it's typically not who you go into business with matters, you know a lot and so you know where I think we we did not. We had...

...heard for some of them. We had a lot of investors, from angels to family offices to professional DC's, who all have different incentives right of what they're trying to achieve. They all have their business in their goals, and I think we're you know, early on when you're like hey, I need money to pay for the payroll to continue moving, because we'll say client has a sixty or ninety day you know, payment terms or something like that. So cash flow is always an issue to start up. You kind of look and say, listen to the money will matter. The terms matter less about it if I don't exist, right, so let me just take the money. We could figure that out later. Well, I think some of that is understanding kind of who your partners are, bringing on the right investors, because they will be with you through the rest of it for the most part, right, and whether that's five, seven, ten years, and so again, understanding, doing your due diligence. You know, we had done some we had probably heard some stories that probably should have kind of swayed us away from taking some of the money from some investors, but at the time it just seemed like the easier route. Arguably seemed like better terms, and I think this also kind of shows why you need good lawyers and you know, and good mentors and advisors on. So you know, we didn't go into any of it blindly, but we probably were a little naive of assuming that, you know, those stories were one awesome wouldn't happen to us all. Right, lesson learn there is. If there's the the stories, the feelings, the inklings, pay attention to them. That's that's one. That is some of it. I mean, don't you think some of it's probably just experience? Like, I don't know what maybe you would do things differently today. But to your point, cash flow, team's opportunity growth, all of those things, they they are things that you had to respond to and and you know, have as a catalyst. And so I hindsights always two thousand and twenty, but but sometimes I think it's part of your experience. So the next venture you you do, if you choose to be a founder again, I know that sometimes it takes some years of re recovery to want to get that kids. But you know, that's that's the benefit of having a serial found it right is that's what investors begin to love because you you've been there and done that. So your own sophistication and I don't know if this was your first you know, for in entrepreneurship or being a founder, by some of it it's kind of the bumps and bruises, like at the battle scars along the way. Yeah, one hundred percent it is. The experience is unparalleled. I mean I wouldn't change those five years. I learned more in those five years that I probably would have taken me forty and still not have learned it as an outsider. And Yeah, there's something to be said about going through it right it you understand, you know, the nuances of building a business, of creating a culture of understanding and to build technology. So it was definitely my first foray into a technology start up and go to market strategy right, how the product fits into, you know, an enterprise versus a mid market, versus's and be the nuances of the way technology is consumed today are even five years ago versus what it was ten fifteen years ago, understanding procedures within enterprise, percurement and so you know, we all touched on those, but if you worked for large organizations, those were kind of things you arguably didn't either. You didn't deal with day today or was kind of like a second thought as a start up. Those are all things that must come into your strategy because they will affect the timing of everything, the execution and so going through it from the beginning it. It's an experience that just can't can't be replicated that you can read all the books and they can give you good inside as the things that you you know, know that you don't know, like the known unknowns. Yeah, but but it is also why people, you know, bring on advisors and bring on mentors, and I would say that was one of the things that we were very lucky to have, is that, for the most part, although we were, you know, some things we thought we knew and we were wrong. Other things we were aware of and consciously decide to do something different and sometimes at...

...work, sometimes it didn't, but we very seldom winning completely blind with no information, and that was because we had a good, you know, a good mentor advisor team along with us who had done this in several instances and it talked about, hey, you know, if you take on certain terms now, they those things could bite you three years from now, and we had probably said at the time a three years and now who knows where the world is. It's fine. Three years. Three years later we're like shit, we shouldn't have. Shouldn't that two years ago. So you know, you do, you live, you learn. You kind of I would say you're kind of like the teenagers. Your parents tell you like be careful, this could happen. You're like, oh, that's not going to happen to me, and then it happens here, like crap, parents are right. That's kind of what the startup is with your advisors. They give you some advice because they've seen it happen. You know, more often than not and every you know, sometimes you get lucky and it's not the case, but but more often than not they're probably on the right side of the of the result. And so that's how I would kind of talk about started start to like teenagers and hopefully you're able to kind of grow out of that that phase and into adult, whole adulthood with good parents. I love the analogy. I'm, you know, cracking up at that thinking about just all these rebellious teenagers and then the the advisor parents. I think they're shaking their head and back in my day that's exactly it's exactly totally all right, so tell me. So I I'm fascinated any time anybody goes through an experience like this. To your point, you can read all the books, but I mean that's one of the reasons I love this podcast is you're hearing such human stories. Tell me, you know, if you can synthesize it down into one, maybe two points, what's the the best thing you learned during that experience? And then we'll get into you know, what that aquisition all that looked like. But what's the best thing you learned? And then maybe the most painful thing you learned? Could still be a good thing, but painful to learn it. Yeah, so the best thing we learned about the start up was that, in my mind, culture of the team is the number one factor of success and that the culture likely will have to change over time. Obviously, you know, when you're two three person company to a two thousand and twenty five Person Company, which is where we were towards the end, is very different, and so the the culture that you define, the vision that you have as the founders and leaders, that is one of the biggest reasons people join a startup and so being very clear, concise, consistent amongst that vision, to create that so in type of culture that you want to have, I think is one of the most critical elements to success and to kind of battle through the inevitable obstacles that you will have and when everyone is aligned, you're able to kind of come together kind of get through that. I very much look guys like a sports team when everyone's kind of on the same mission. Yeah, people figure out their roles, they help out where they can. It's truly a team effort and and that type of culture of we're all on the same mission, we all have the same kind of goals, we all have our roles within that to get to achieve that, it's really the only way to kind of be successful. In regards to one of the biggest pain points, I think was actually give you two and there were probably a lot win too, but they were different. Two, which was from the investment side, was taking money from people that you really want to work with and you trust. That was number one and that would be across the board, even if it meant raising less mind and then I think the other thing was having a little bit of patients, especially around the product where you know, we were giving my background is in sales. We were always selling ahead, but understanding, if you're building the technology, that there is a nuance and procedure and process to doing so, and so not trying to sell too far ahead, because there were times where, you know, we overpromised under delivered, and you always want to do the opposite. And so you know patients. Unfortunately, is a lot of Sali seople don't have, and...

...it's probably one of the key things you need in the startup because things will break. It takes time to build things and it cannot, thinks, going to happen so fast. So those are probably kind of the the ones that could have generally always stick out. I think there's so much interconnectivity between the best things, who learned and maybe the painful things, because right a team should should bring different things sales. It should be persistent, they should be growth hungry, they should be thinking ahead, but to be able to have, whether it's, you know, another founder on board or team members that can balance that patience that can be thinking about, you know, not just the immediacy of taking dollars but the long term trust and relationship. And so I'm curious within your founding partnership or maybe even early stage team, did you find that you personally had to emulate a lot of those those maybe competing values, or were you able to have multiple people in your team playing those roles? Yeah, so we realize was that we needed to play those roles as founders. You know, it's a requirement that you play them right, because otherwise it can feel, you know, disingenuous, and so you need to kind of portray that and believe that and live that all the time. And the key was, though, as you're busy and whether it be fundraising or doing sales calls or traveling, when travel was you know, I think we did what I've done in a long time, but when I knew it, I remember you used to do it, and when I you know, when you're kind of gone or out of the office or and meetings, you do need to have a team that will emulate that for you right and so hiring the right leadership was a key factor. I would say that was one of the interesting things that we started to do later on where, you know, at the level that we were at, which was, you know, very small team for all tense purposes, was we we looked at people who had worked at startups for as a a key metric, you know, outside of a resume, because you know, we had done the, would say, early mistake of hiring on a on the resume alone, meaning that they had, you know, great schooling, that had come from a big name company, they were in the industry. If you looked at the resume, anyone, any outside of would looking said this is impressive, this person should be successful. There's no doubt. And it was a complete opposite right because they hadn't been or understood the nuances of being at a start up and what it required. And so we found was obviously those things are important, but the ability to, you know, work at a startup requires you to get into the weeds, to be self sufficient, to you know, learn things on your own, because you don't have the resources, you don't have necessarily the the the experts in the room with you all the time. And you know, that was one of the things that we started to look for when we were hiring, and that worked at super well for us because obviously we still look for certain skills sets, but skill sets that had worked in a startup or had done it maybe within a certain amount of time, so they knew what they were getting into, because I think the expectations that other people have as it starts are all cool and fun and that they're right. You know, they all have great lunches and, you know, snacks and all that kind of stuff, and most setups are not Google or facebook, and even if you fill them in, I don't think you can clem into that bucket now, but even at the time. Right. So, so that was one of the key eliments that, from a hiring culture perspective, that we really looked for. That was a key, a key elimn and then the other thing was obviously we really focus on like interns to kind of really evaluate people, and that was actually super helpful because we did find, though, that a lot of, you know, young people out of college had a big thirst for, you know, doing things on their own, learning on their own. I think this kind of concept of remote work or remote learning, you know, way for startups is a big plus, because people are kind of, you used to self learning, and so what we did notice...

...was that, you know, the those kind of coming graduating from colleges had a had a pretty robust thirst for for startups and a good kind of acclamation to getting into the weeds of everything. So that was kind of an inche thing where we were able to promote a bunch of our kind of young interns who went from intern to coordinator to a manager and kind of growth throughout the business and take on different roles. So that was also kind of a successful model for us. I love that. We could probably have an entire other session around, you know, talent strategies in a startup and and how you do that, how you build team, how what is culture look like? And I'll hold you to it on a follow up session. Okay, so we're five years in. You and your partner of take an investment, some investment that you know, sounds like from painful lessons learn maybe not not always aligned, or, you know, the the dollars weren't green, to use your words. You're in q two thousand and nineteen. You say, okay, let's look at our different options, right. We maybe go out for a series B, we look at possible acquirers, we look at just different, different avenues and decide what's best for the company at this stage. And so take me, take me through two thousand and nineteen. Q Four. Yeah, so it I should probably started in q three. Of twenteen where we were kind of contemplating. We had gotten approach with some interest, you know, partnerships that I would say, you know, look, that made a lot more sense more as acquisitions. But you know, the the approach was more of that and you know, we were we knew that we had a good runway into the the first half of two thousand and twenty and you know, you obviously want to try and raise money before you're out of it. So that that takes time and to donally speaking, will take kind of three to six months. So we knew we had to kind of start soon. If that was going to be the case, then you know, some investor drama and suit and we we said, listen, they're the reality is that, you know, in acquisition is going to be the best method to kind of resolve this versus kind of bringing more people into the into the bubble. So we said, let's see what this looks like and luckily my partner I had enough, enough control of the business for the most part to kind of to move the needle there. And, you know, we went out to the market, we put ourselves capped on said let's see what we can do in a relatively short period of time because this was right around that mid to end of October and twenty and nineteen had a you know New Year's and Christmas that fell right right in the middle of the week. So that was two weeks in. December was pretty much gone. So we had about a six weeek window going into the New Year that we knew we need to kind of make some things happen, and so we end up having about thirty conversations basically November and early December. Company that helping sales people that manage to have thirty net new conversations and November and December. So kudos there. Thank you. Yeah, I have to say it was probably one of my most aggressive sales outreaches in quite some time, even with the business. But you know, the death of the business or success of the business, variety on you can kind of force you to figure things out hotly. But we had those conversations and they were all, you know, some some very large players, two more kind of medium companies to some private equity, and we dandled that down to those that were more serious. We had about turn of them dive into the data room towards the end of December into the new year. By mid January we ended up having three offers and two of them were heavier announced but but strong offers, and then one was an all cash deal. Now, you know, interesting when you, I think, you look at things, you would say we're in a great subjectory. You know, we've signed some big name clients. We were probably in the best position we've ever been hitting. Some of these numbers were aggressive, as as intended by the choir, but things that we think we can all hit if things stay the way they were. And what was interesting was that my background is in finance, partor in sales and you know, I just felt like the market hadn't had...

...a turn ten years and the first things that typically a cut our tiene marketing events and we said, listen, that that environment, which after ten year bull run, is likely to happen at some point soon, and probably more likely in the next two years. You know, this all cash deal still a good deal right. It maybe doesn't look as being on paper over two years, but it's it's a good deal. Everyone gets jobs, most of you know the investors are going to be happy and this is a good win right. It's like hitting a double in baseball. Versus maybe the home run. YEA, doubles guaranteed. The the home run is, you know, twenty five percent chance, let's say. And we said, you know what, we've seen too many instance where people get too greedy in the long run just doesn't work out. Let's let's just take the win and we took that deal. We felt like it was really good alignment. It would ended up being with this to equity partners, be a sevent there's the largest event management software in the world. So everyone. They took the entire team. My cofounder and I decided and kind of early negotiations that, you know, we didn't necessary feel that we want to kind of go over a full time and they understood that. Have to say, they were super gracious and understanding. They've done like sixty acquisitions in the last like five years, so they were, I think, pretty adeptive the understanding kind of personalities and founders being in a different kind of mental state. But we we negotiate, obviously a transition period to kind of help them move everything over and interesting of the team, and we did that. But they wanted a quick close and we were fine with that and they wanted a three week close. It was probably of the five years. Those three weeks were probably the most stressful because dealing with lawyers every day, about documents, with the documents say and don't say. I think every day I thought like we didn't include some statement like this is going to kill the deal. We're done. But three weeks went by and February twenty we officially closed and I can tell you that both in our minds and probably the general conversation in the office had zero of zero word covid attached to it at all. And about ten days later that completely changed and we were talking about not community the office for a period of time. And about thirteen days later, like the world, that changed. So you know, you go back and look about running things down to the wire. You know we could not have cut it any closer. So yeah, we're going. That's to be a good win. Yeah, I mean that's insane, like the fat one, the so many pieces about this one. You Win these deals with companies that any of US listening would be, you know, mind blown to do business with. Right then you say, okay, it's probably the emotional journey of investor drama, to use your word, aggressive sales kick you guys, you know that speaks to it, to the talent. They're both of the product that you had as well as your own ability, is to tee up all these meetings, get ten opportunities on the table, dwend it down to three, q one, you negotiate this deal, covid happens and you still sell. And, by the way, this is an event tracking and Roy Platform. Like, how did you process this, like coming off of this right now? It's up to where almost in October when this airs, it will be October. What is the six months been post acquisition for you? I mean, I did what did you do to really process this? How is the company doing today? And then how how have you reset and kind of reground it after going through what I imagine, to your point, was like, you know, five years over three months, or or whatever it was. Yeah, no, I mean I can say that my partner and I, probably three weeks into into the sale or the official close, basically said to ourselves that we are the luckiest people in the world right now. A lottery after that. Yeah, we taught I think I did...

...actually, but we definitely taught. I didn't want on that one, but we we definitely realize that. Man, when they say timy is everything. Timy is everything, and so we said it. We said we were just very lucky. It's better to be lucky and good. You know, it wasn't something that happened overnight. We put a lot of time and effort to get to where it had to make that happen and to get into a good place. I mean, you know, I would say there's no doubt that we would either have been out of business or truly had to fire sale the business, you know, had things been delayed. You know, a month, so right. A week, yeah, it or week. Yeah, basically week, it would have been like wall, let's see what happens with this thing coming from China, and it would have been like yeah, let's not do steal. So yeah, it was one of those we felt very lucky, but it almost in a weird way, I felt like those five years of the hard work and everything to push it and push ourselves in towards the end of two thousand and nineteen to make something happen, to kind of get through the investor drama, to put our team into a good place, into a good home, to kind of get that win, that all the that effort in the the speed and urgency that we did it, you know, ended up paying off in obviously something that we could have never have anticipated or plan for, but I think that's why, you know, you push as hard as you can, as fast as you can, because you just you never know, and that that's a very good example of it. But since then, you know, took a little time off, took a few months, a little time, like I'm doing my sabbatical now. I want you to tell me what's a little time, but my little time was probably about two months. Two months I haven't had a still too but a little over to now had two year old, so it was great to kind of spend some time with him and you know, we were quarantined anyway, and so you know, it was it was in a weird way it was a good quarantine for us because it was just, you know, family time and then there was no kind of work, or I didn't really have to work from home or that kind of so it was, in odd timing of a nice little break across the board. But after about two months I started getting itching and trying to do stuff and figure out kind of what was next and figured the dependemic wouldn't make things any easier. And you know, and I'm one that always loves to learn and continue learning. So, you know, I had done some advisory work in the past and decided to continue to do that. So I took on about four or five clients, most of them around a series around to funding tech companies and helping them around there go to mark a strategy, general advisement across you know, investment in structure, and then also we had gone through an accelerator called entrepreneurs round table accelerator Earra and New York, which is a great experience for us, and so I became an entrepreneur residents. They're helping across some of their classes that come through around similar type things. So was doing that for a number of months and then, across those introductions from investors and other people that I just knew, I ended up getting introduced to the founder of swyable. He's a physicist, former head of global digital product for the New York Times and cool, casual. Yeah, casually, and you know, he, he. You know, he was an interesting, interesting guy. He's an Australian, which the action always gets you to kind of listening a little more what they're talking about. And then I was intrigued with what they were building. You know, my background is in the marketing media space. Prior to to kind of the startup and most of the the tech start a platforms, there had been in like the media distribution world and that world has been kind of hit hard from lower valuations, harder MNA or it just been kind of a harder world over the last part five to ten years. To to quote unquote, be successful, I have a successful kind of outcome. But what I found that they were taking out of a very different approach and they were focusing much more on the...

...creative side of marketing. They're our background is in politics and advocacy and started really as a social impact company out of Y combinator. So they were really hard focus on how do we get the creative and messaging to or how creative a messaging impacts voter and ten and voter impact, and so that's really where their roots are. was to really kind of help those trying to change the world get their message across in a way that actually resonates with people, and so they tried to basically bring science into the way that you gain those insights and so they built that a whole you know, they've spent a lot of money building out a whole data science platform to be able to kind of not not just take surveys, but to analyze these surveys and build in kind of what's called Ourct, or randomized control trial testing, which is kind of the the goal standard for any type of science test, right, for any time experiment. It's what the FDI uses for vaccines to prove that their their efficacy and that they work. And that's what they brought now to the creative world, and so they started to expand, started getting interest from brands of saying, you know, one, we need to be agile, because brands obviously have taken approach that corporate culture has a broader impact on society. One early and to the way that they message. Our consumer is consistently changing, right, and their consumer, the way that they view created, the way that they view messages, whether it because the seasonality, whether it be because of new product launches, whether it be because of the certain environments or things happening in the world today. Brands need to be agile, and so what they built was a platform that can get you these incredible, you know, scientific results within twenty four hours, which typically are things that were done by large agencies, market research agencies, that would take, you know, several weeks of several months. Focus groups, which you know right now, if they're being done, they're being done over Zum, and kind of taking what has been an old school manual process and really turned into an actual technology. So within that advising work and talking to them, you know, we they kind of approached me of if it was something that I would be interesting going to help them build out their go to market strategy and both from partnerships and their revenue. And Yeah, I just fell in love with the team. A lot of people smarter than I think. I think God happened another your Stanford, NBA's and PhDs, but you know, I just thought there was a really big opportunity to, you know, have an impact on the way that marketers reach their consumers, specifically marketers who want to have a bigger impact, which I think is kind of a unique take to their to their market research. Totally. I mean there's so much timeliness about what their what's labels bringing to market? I mean certainly right now, and it's that you all coming from the political and Advocacy Space Amidstt. You know, as we go in to November, I'm sure has an entire, you know, piece of Your Business. And then, to your point, company is in brands and I think we're seeing this even more on the other side of this pandemic. You know what company stand for, how they're they're coming to market is so much more than the products they're selling or, you know, traditional means of marketing. It's really this holistic view of how consumers are viewing them and and engaging. So I am excited for what you're bringing to them and what they're bringing to the market. That's that sounds like fun. It is. It's been a it's been a month. It's been Super Fun. It's super exciting to see it again. I think it all, what was one of the things I really kind of got drawn into was a culture of belief. Right. They believe what they're doing, they believe in the product, they believe in the data. They believe and what the data can help companies do and drive their message, both of the political front and on the brand front. And so you know, when you work with people that are excited about what they're doing daytoday, you know that that just makes everything so much easier. Yeah,...

...me, it goes back to your point around the the culture piece, especially in an early stage company, and belief is a really good rallying cry. How this has been this has been an honor for me to sit down with you. I mean, I've come to know you, but I got to hear more of your story and I think you know, as I think about the revenue collective community and WHO's going to find value in this story and also, you know, who should connect with you, I'm thinking those that are founders, are may be interested in being founders. I think about those that are in those early stage companies that are going through the growing pains, those that are maybe even in the established companies that are saying, how do we become a bit more innovative, how do we create a culture that people that want to be here, that belief? I can see so much relevance and I would ask for you, who do you want to be connecting within the revenue collective community? You know, if people are listening to this, who are those folks that should should get in touch and how should they get in touch with you? Yeah, absolutely. Mean the revenue collective group has been amazing. I've definitely been highly engaged there, whether it be through slack or any of the lunch meetings on a weekly basis. The amount of town sharing the people have done, the you know, you post a question, you get thirty answers. People would just genuinely willing to help each other out. So I think the network in the group has been amazing and I'm more than happy to talk with anyone. If there's anyone that I think you know that thinks that I can be helpful in any way or give them a certain perspective, I'd be happy to have a conversation. They can reach out either via email, which I believe is successful, through revenue collective, or through the revenue collective slack. I definitely check in a minimum months a day, although the number of notifications as increased drastically over the last last six months to a year. But I'm pretty excessiful Linkedin, I'm accessible. Always happen to talk with a team. Yeah, and anybody that you know. I'm going to be looking to grow my team as well. So if they're people looking for new opportunities, I know there's a big kind of group out there that is in transition or on the bench likely, probably going into next year, will be kind of reaching out the sun to have some conversations as well. So they're people are kind of aligned with the mission and excited about what we're doing. Be Happy to hear from them, you know, sooner than later. Excellent. I'll thank you so much for joining us today. This has been a wonderful conversation. I've learned a ton and I'm excited to hear the here, the feedback from our group when we when we share this story. Awesome case. It was a pleasure speaking with you. Thanks so much abouting me on. All right. Well, we will see see you out there in the community and we will be publishing this here soon. So I'll thank you and with that we are signing off. Thank you, Al that was a pretty good inaugural episode for me. I loved being able to sit down with you here about your story and I appreciate how much authenticity you brought with that. Let's wrap with today. This episode was brought to you by Sindoso. They deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make your outreach more personal. All right, revenue collective. It's been fun. This is chaog signing out, take care of.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (242)