The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 5 months ago

Ep 199: Every Problem is Solvable w/ Morten Bruun

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 199: Every Problem is Solvable w/ Morten Bruun 

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone, and welcome back to the pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandonboart, and you are listening to is this a good time? The show where I put pavilion members on the hot seat for fifteen minutes. They tell us incredible stories. It's Super Fun. Shows are out Thursday, so hit subscribes so you don't miss hearing from our experts. Our guest today is Morton Brune. He's the VP of global operations at works on. We talked about how every problem is a solvable one as long as you put the right amount of resources towards it. I loved that idea. This month sponsor is Sandso, the leading corporate gifting platform that inspires human connections for revenue driven teams to stand out at strategic points throughout the customer journey. All right, let's do this episode. Ninety seven, getting close to a buck here. Is this a good time? All right, everyone, I'm so excited to have Mortin Brune with us. He is the VP of global operations for works on. Excited to chat about all things you know, and great to have you here,...

Morton. Well, pleasure to be here him. So I thanks you. Thanks for inviting me. Pretty excited about it. Well, awesome, and I'll meet NOE filler. Jumping right into to the pot, tell us a little bit about what you do today and then how you got here. You have a even incredible work history and I want to kind of get into that. Sure. Yeah, so today I oversee works on so global operation. I joined works some almost one and a half year ago. The first sort of mission was to start up works them in the in the US. So we're the company expanded into London a few years ago and then next up was what's the US? So I've set up the North American team. We're now twenty five people. So yeah, basically we're still in that journey right, but but now we see our global operations. So look very much into everything sort of in the background as well. So that includes revenue operations, micing, sales operations, go to market strategy, all of that. Yes, and tell everyone what works and does, just just for those that don't know. Sure, so, where some helps company that uses a lot of independent contractors and free dances. So a lot of, especially large enterprises,...

...would have a pretty significant contingent workforce and tippity when you work with you know, dad volume of contractors. You have a lot of administrative issues, whether it's paying people or the compliance aspect of contracts. So you can essentially think about us as an HR system for independent contractors. Would do payments and pay rolling and compliance. We give you sort of an overview into you at full talent base of contractors. So just make it easier for everyone to to hire in penning contractors. Got It awesome. And and before that you'd a couple interesting stops along the way. I mean you e spent obviously a lot of time in Copenhagen. Is that where you're originally from? I'm like a country a countryside guy, but but I moved to Copenhagen when I was eighteen or nineteen, I think so. I think beautiful. So you've been there for a minute and and you had some stopovers, doing some consulting with mckinzi also at Google to you know, tell us what it was like to work, you know, for a branch of Google all the way, you know,...

...far away from maybe we're some of the hubs of Google, are sure? So Google with my first job. So it was in many ways amazing. I really loved my time there and I think, especially as the first job, you get very spoiled, right, you know, you have all the perks and the benefits and Nice nacks. People are very nice. You work on some exciting stuff. So so I really had a fun time there. And sometimes when you work like outside the larger offices, I think Copenhagen when I joined Google, was, you know, thirty, forty people maybe. Wow. So you sort off you get a little bit of the start of feel you sort of a small, small office and and you know, not a big company and Denmark by any means, but you still have sort of the global cloud of Google and whatnot. So that was pretty exciting. and M kids was a little bit the same. Right. You know you're part of a big global company, but your office in itself, and Copenhagen was also rather small, so you sort of still get that intimate feeling while you started part of a big corporate as well. So I think was quite cool.

Any interesting products that either one that you could, you know, dive into that that you remember the were pivotal, or just kind of fun, Fun ancdotes. Yeah, I mean I think both places you get a lot of responsibilities, right, so you you get to work with really big companies and sort of the brand of Google and mckinzie gets you into many interesting conversations. So I think, especially a google, you really get thrown out into deep water. You wore I was an account executive for part of my time. There's a managed group those partnerships with some large Danish companies. That's so one of the things that I did was that I am there flew sort of a delegation of sea levels from from the largest Dan is Talco, to San Francisco where we visited the big headquarter and had meetings with couples of inches can guys. Of One of them was the guy who heads up ai for Google cloud. Oh Wow, that is pretty dope guy. So I think you just, you know, twenty five at the time and I'm I'm sitting here with all these CEOS and whatnot and talkinging about a I which I know nothing...

...of. So that was a that was sounds pretty fun. That's right, man, very cool. Well, look, I think you know we always talked about success coming from both hard work and luck, and I wonder if you have a story either from your path that the really kind of propelled you to get to where you are today. Share. It's a good question right. I think for me one of the things that I learned at the place like mckinzie is that most problems can be solved if you just dedicate time and put in the hours at it. That's really the Mackenzie recipe. I think I thought that there was going to be this secret book of frameworks that you could pull out and then you'll be able to crack any solution. But spoiler, little alert, there's there's really no such things. So the only thing that you can really do is, you know, put your very best into solving an issue and then then you'll be able to do it. So I think that's been one of my big learnings in my career, is that there's really no reasons to be scared of jumping into a situation or trying to tackle an issue, no matter like how hard or daunting and may seem. oftentimes,...

...if you just do your very best and you put it in the work and the effort, you'll come out on the other side with a with a pretty good solution. So so I think that has been one of my main learnings. At least. I like that. I like the man. That's that's very cool. was there ever, I mean what was like the hardest situation that that you got put into? It, Mackenzie, something that it was kind of above your head. Well, I mean I think my one of my first projects was was pretuerman transformation at a big payment processing companies. Oh Wow, and if you've been doing advertising as an account executive with Google for four years, you have no about anything and that is that area. So so I think that was definitely a place where you just like there's not even you know you you're on deep water, but it's like you're in the middle of the notion. There's no land inside, there's no nothing. You just really have to just work from first principles and and try to like apply logic and rationals or something. You know, try to get as much input...

...as you can from like the real experts, but at the end of the day your best shot is, you know, just do your best and and work very hard at us. So I did that for three months and I think, you know, the client is probably the right ones to evaluate that. But but I think everyone was pretty happy about the outcome. So cool, cool, and look, before we before we move into some of the easier quicker questions, you know, tell us about what made you want to move to the US and and and or, you know, was that part of joining works? On it was kind of part of the deal, was to come to the US in the first place. And then what made you want to come out and be in New York? I mean, I know why, because I think it's a great city in the world. But sure, until it from your perspective, I mean the Corny answers love right. My my wife got a job in the city. So so we asu moved to you a while I was working at mckinsee. Oh cool. So I always wanted to go to the city and live here like full time. Then I've been working with the founders from works some while I was at Google. So we've always been, you know, staying in touch and in the beginning...

...were talked about, you know, if I should join work some and then it was more mad of like when I should join works. The I think of really missing sort of the fast pace that you see in many startups. And even though you know McKinsey and Google are pretty fast paced company as is, while at the end of the day they're just their big culprits a swam. And so think what I really wants it to. A sort of the combination of being at a startup that was very fast paced, very ambitious, where there was like a great team and really exciting vision, and then New York. So when worksome wants it to open up their their US office, that was that was pretty much a perfect, perfect scenario for me, and I know it was a bit of a Noba Nice, beautiful and let's let's jump into some things that are practically what's something that is a sales or marketing tactic that you think people overlooked, that they should be, you know, deploying? You know, straightaway? I think there was, I think there's quite a few. So so I think one of the main ones, I think, is really understanding, you know, who are you selling to and...

...what their motivations are. Right. So I think the sort of exercise of, you know, thinking through what your ideal customer are, and oftentimes, I think you see that from looking at WHO's actually using the product to day and really loving it. So understanding who those personas are and like, you know, what characterizes him. That was something for me that I think helped us a long way, because you can often be sort of lost and in either the data or just, you know, trying to understand a big segment at a time, but really assooming into one specific use case and trying to understand that was what's really helpful, cool, awesome. And any key positions that you're hiring for? So we're building up our operations team. So we just onboarded our miting operations manager this week, which we've been quite exciting. So in addition to that, we're hiring a few analyst as well. So I think for us we've seen just the importance of having data available to all the stakeholders being able to surface great insights to, you know, leaders across the revenue teams. It's been really powerful. So I think operations is like really my core these days and there and both people with great insights into tooling...

...and systems, but also with the with the great understanding of data. Yeah, it's it's really key, awesome. And and then give some shoutouts anybody that you know come up and commerce or bolts who you follow and kind of appreciate what they're putting out in the world. Sure, I mean I think I really love sort of the team that we have here to works on, but but if I were the thing outside of that, Kevin Shoe, who's a cofound and CEO of catalysts. He's well, first of all, he's a dear friend of mine, but he's also my goat to and everything from, you know, building a great company and and and a really a strong culture and scaling up in a very short amount of time has been super helpful. Emilidrby, as well as you, a templify amazing revenue leader. We've used a mel a lot when we were building up and scaling up our own team. He's been through the same journey of starting up a Danish company in the US. Yeah, so I think those two have definitely been key for me. Yeah, awesome and awesome and, you know, last but not least, I'm not going to let you off the hook with just the US...

...restaurant. If you give me one, you're going to have to give me something a Copenhagen, because I got a couple in mind. But what's what's the spot? We got to go here, you can say anywhere, and then you got to give me the Copenhagen one. Wow, so the Copenhagen ones. I mean, I think most people, or at least if you are very much into food. You'll know about the noma and and you know Geranium and like the big mischiling stars restaurant. You know those are exciting. I think my scene is more, maybe a little bit more, you know, underground and local. I like guerrilla a lot in the meat packing that's really good if you want to have like, you know, a fun time. Right there is another place. There's a big new area called Cleveen, which is sort of a little bit of an island Oh in the Hart with Copenhagen. They have a ton of great restaurants along the ocean. So you can sympically sit down at the waterfront. You have this amazing view in over of the city. You can jump into the water because it's cleans you can take a swim and then go back at the bar, grab a drink and and and a snack and then then you're pretty good. That would be minight out in Copenhagen. I think that that sounds good. I Bet I hope...

...it's like August or something. The Wall is warm. I guess that's the thing with governating who do this for like two months in the year and then after that you know you you should stay inside. Yeah, I know that man well, Morton, so good to have you on the pod. You know you're working on some exciting stuff and it's cool that you've taken a leap to come to us and do this stuff here. I excited to just be connected and support you along the way. Man. Yeah, of course. Well, it's been a pleasure of to be here, so looking forward to staying in touch. Nice man. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in the apple podcast or spotify a sentences some friends and make sure to smash that subscribe button. This episode was brought to you by some Doso. They are redefining the way businesses inspire human connections by offering an intelligent gifting experience with a global fulfilment infrastructure, highly curated premium vendors, deep analytics and personalization at scale. I had so much fun today. I hope you did.

You now go crush your numbers.

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