The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 19: Do You Have a Book Brewing Inside of You? Matt Bray Tells All

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 19: Do You Have a Book Brewing Inside of You? Matt Bray Tells All

Hi and welcome to the revenue collective podcast. My Name Is Casey let Gordon and I'm your host. Today I'm sitting down with Matt Bray. Matt is the author of the book the Partnership Principle. He'll be telling us a behind the scenes look at what it was like to write a book, and for those of you listening that may have a book brewing inside you, this is the place to go. They also want to give a shout out to today's sponsors. This month's sponsor is Sindoso. Sindoso, the leading sending platform, is the most effective way for revenue generating teams to stand out with new ways to engage at strategic points throughout the customer journey. By connecting digital and physical strategies, companies can engage, acquire and retain customers easier than ever before. Thank you to Sindoso and let's dig in with Matt. Hello Everyone, this is Casey let Gordon, your revenue collective podcast host, and I am sitting down with Matt Bray, the author of the new book the Partnership Principal. Matt, thank you for being here. Thank you all right. So, when I got the email from Sam that you and I were going to talk. I was so excited because this is a side of our revenue collective community I don't think we've explored yet. And when you and I were talking, you said this topic is around. If you have a book brewing inside you, I'm going to tell all. I'm going to tell about my experience of writing it, the goods, the Bads, what it was like to take time off, how I took my knowledge and experiences and put it down to paper. And even with that, will see the last ten percent of giving it over the finish line and and what that looks like. So I'm I'm excited to sit down today and appreciate you, you know, talking about your journey. Yeah, thank you. What a journey it's been. I think when people constemplate or have this idea of writing a book and actually think, right, what am I going to write it about? Who's going to be my target audience? Were going to be my goals, and all that kind of fundamental that process and thought pattern that you've got to sort of stop putting down and create some logic in direction out of it. There's a stat that says only one percent of people who actually think about doing it actually do it, it's actually walk out the other ends and say that I've done it and being, for me, a phenomenal achievement to say the least. But I did do it in in six months, which a bit mind blowing. A lot of people take a fair number of years to do it. But it did the help of obviously taking the time off through the period of Covid and filling and obviously being part of revenue collected, gave me kind of inspiration stop sitting down and writing and actually dealing with some of the challenges that a lot of members of the revenue collective have within the arena of partnerships, which is still, to some degree, an unknown dark car when it comes to generating indirect revenue. So really I was give it a purpose, I guess, through the revenue collected, to sit down and really start writing at it really took on shape from its Im from there. And why? And if you went out to do to create what effective was a guy book in bottleships, tricks and tips and all that, full of stuff that you could use to generate revenue turned into two hundred forty nine pages of for nine thousand words in book form. This probably some Amazon. So yeah, it's it really took shake, took forward the go mind. It was that journey to say. But but it's a really good journey. So, yeah, happy to share that with you on this book up. That is amazing. I think you by far one. You're in the one percent of people that published a book actually followed through. But to you're probably the most productive person I've experienced during quarantine. Right, like you, you took this limit and turn it into lemonade here, and I think that's amazing. You've been starty kind. I think my job is the podcast house, right, I got to blurtter you up so I get all the real, real dirt. Yeah, remember, remember, I'm British. Say So, I don't do the Woohoo thing, but but I but I'll try and do my quicket clap. And we're getting a lesson here people in American and British dynamics. Right, it's great. We're hitting hitting all the topics. Okay, so quickly, just so I can situate our members in in your experiences, you were coming off of working at sales trip and now you are working at signatio. Tell me a little bit about both companies and and what your role has been around partnerships. To your point that the dark art. Yeah, okay, so two kind of questions in one. They're so. So what's my history and partnerships and that sales trips and Signavia journey. Okay, so I took a little about the signal vio. The sel trips is not be a journey. First. So...

I spent to Korea working in two kind of ecosystems. I guess these easy swear said it. One ecosystem I've spent good for fifteen, twenty years working which is in business travel. So I done everything from set up three service companies or travel agency. They process transactions but they do the consulting, implementation and manage services kind of off the back of it. And then part of that it's employee why they're in business travel has employe their management. So I've spent about four or five years working for a company called air class that sold payment products. was owned by LUFT UNSER and I ran enterprise sales cross Europe for them. And then there was a very cool little company that was growing in Europe called conquer who was just starting out, and I got asked to go work in their partnerships division as employee what thirty, I think it was them, and then took that all the way through to for the acquisition by FAP for eight point three billion in two thousand and fifteen. So you had a phenomenal journey there and there's a lead. This is the kind of a leading into. So I had a career Bris jove and I also had a moved after the ex position into the sales force ecosystem and I worked for a mature ipe called exactly, and then that led me to meet and start up bounders that sold their invoicing solutions, sell sporce and had a bit of money and want to do something different. So I got together to them put a large amount of investment into a new company called cells trip and we built it literally from idea to winning the innovation ward at dreamforce for our product on salesporce back in two thousand and the routine, I think it was. So I had a phenomenal right there and then obviously covid hit pretty bad and pretty much for the Stop to business travel in its entirety. Everyone's working around now, you know. So so forever we start up to you're looking to re pivot redesign. We think you know what the formula is where you got to take your what Your Business and we it was obviously we need to absolutely scale down and I put my hand up as a well, look, my wife wants to go back to nursing, homeschooling with a kid. I'd love to bit of spend some of the family. Ever, spent two and a fight years building the start up and it's valued a hundred million. That at that point and I think we'll look. I'm going to take a take a step back and take time out and actually I'm the sort of character that I've got to do something. I want to get back. So a week into go voluntary furrow I got absolutely bored and I was spending a long the time with Sam Jacob and the team and a telepont the community and I had this idea of a book and spent the next six months doing that through writing that they were. There was obvious that we needed to make some massive cutbacks within the business. So I took a out. Kept sort of my footing through a kind of board, kind of levels, but wanted to get my hands dirty again in partnerships and I got asked by a very good friend of mine, the used to run allantic to conker come and join him a Signavigo to go build out the mere channel operation. So, Ye, know me, I like doing Ethel Self, building partnership programs and scratch. It needed some infrastructure around. It needs some maturity. I sort of the challenge and and took it. So I'm sort of three weeks, four weeks into that role now. So yeah, really phase two in kind of taking they recently had two d a million and investments for makebacks partners so they've got some money to spend and and they can invest it in getting some more employees into into partnerships, building out the PRM solutions, getting really just getting your Self Enterprise Ready to partnership program is what I wanted to do. COULD BE A book number two? It can, absolutely so. Your experience is really you know, you've certain you've been in the startup space and it sounds like you are in correct me if I'm wrong here, but you are excellent at coming in when we have the foundation of something and we're ready to grow up, we're ready to get to your point, enterprise ready, and the ability to do that. You know, partnerships. They're a long term play and they're usually have to have a lined incentives and I'm sure that's what we'll get into around the art of the partnership principle. Is that the area that you you've just developed your sweet spot in. So that goes back for the twenty years. You know. I mean the business. Our leag system is really interesting because it is so symbiotic and work together. It really is the true essence of how partnerships work and it's really interesting taking the learning from that industry and then applying it into...

...cells force industry and at that and really into the substake and everything. We grew out conquer. When conquer was we had to do this some scratch. No building out, you know, a ferral program, resetup program, building out the platform, so other technology you provided to go build that solutions onto our architecture that we can go. You know, some of they could re self through our sales channel and their products and solutions making us, making their for auct global stickier and a larger the other nights of the stuff. But you know, it was always from scratch. You know, and I've always I always think you, if you, if you understand the basic principles of what you need to do to go build out a partner program even on a limited budget. You know you can make a subcess of it, you can generate in direct revenue, but you just got to know. You just got to know the process and an apply the right methodology, and I think that's that's where I find the most amount of fun. I find I find in the kind of where your where your face is. I start the book with a quote from Theodore Roosevelt and citizens and republic speach, and it's like, if he fails, at least he fells way while so daring greatly so that the base or she'll never be with those calls and timid souls. You know, then you need to know victory or defeat. I think that's it. You've got to just try an Arrow and you've just got to run in it. You got to run a limited budget and you got to just see what works and if you apply the the principles a partnerships and you get those pieces right, you can grow and you can grow this in direct space that I think is relatively untouched in a lot of businesses because business is really focus on that direct route to market. Always direct route to market. But in fact we're now living in an age where we are connected. We are living in an environment where we're adding customer value by bringing the solutions together to provide greater value in the wind, win, win for all parties who are part of this joint value propositions by which brings revenue and just knowing how to do it. So so the book really kind of looks at that. I spend twenty years doing that and it was my piece at tried to write this down and give those members the revenue collected and those of Rovue revenue leaders looking to figuring this time to go drive revenue an option to say, well, there is something else out there. You don't have to look at how to go directly to the market with its marketing, to SDR the SALESHELLE, wherever it there is an ecosystem that you can take advantage of that can accelerate your revenue and really and strengthen your position in your company and strengthen your company's position in the market. That they so just by doing it right. So write down the ingredients and Alex helps and see Ras make that happens. I love it. So okay, thank you for for walking us through that in. So, twenty years in, you take the voluntary furlough, a weekend, you know, your time off with family, you say I gotta get to writing. So had was the book concept something that you had thought about for a while, or was it truly born during this, you know, this quarantine or or time off period? Great Question. Yeah, so I think everyone's got a book in the right and then bark. I don't think I really knew what I was taking on when I said I when I had this crazy idea and light bulb moment of doing it to keep myself busy. However, you know, it's a tick box and it's something I think it's is that everybody say. The kind of the topic really came to me while I was on the channel, partner flag channel of the revenue collective. So I've been a member for about a year and a half and what I found myself doing a lot of times of a bit of down fign from from work, was was going on to the flat channel and, you know, responding to a lot of the challenges that the revenue leaders had in this area of partnerships. You know, and I had this problem around conflict in my reseller channel. I have this problem around setting up the setting up agree. That's what Greema should it like? What does a business plan look like? I'm thinking of opening up a new market. Do I take exclusivity? That all these types of challenges and questions that were absolutely certained by those redue leaders that had taken the plunge into doing partnerships of their business and for me, congratulations for embarking on that journey. So I found myself on the spectrum game where, well, in this scenario, typically this happens and if you apply this methodology, this is probably be the outcome, because I've seen it here where I've worked as...

...the last year, so about a year and a half I was there's a got to know quite a few people who stand out. Just some of the responses people come back with a the time again, oh yeah, he knows what you're talking about. He knows what you're talking about. So I then started having conversations and build a little community with likes of Ed Sullivan, it is a great guy quite already in New York, and various other members, and I just started growing in itself. We all started contributing together to a lot of challenges reny of thes have and I and I was sitting there each into my furlough crazy, you know, everybody, everybody. It's all these interactions are happening two, one to one, fractionally, and I know there was the talk of this knowledge hug coming together. The sound was doing that and I thought, well, that one and I just write this Guy Book and do it in the structure which is very familiar in the world of alliances and channel, which is discovers these and you start a building, build your plan, get your culture, work out your kind of go to market around at actually going go and then go to quiet partners based on that clash of the you fut in place and then build the channel out the back of it and then decide whether you want to outsource or you want to recruit and turning base to what you want to do. But it's there's a kind of structure that you apply. And then I thought, well, if I take all the difference energies that all the different people have had in the year and a half that I've been of interactions that I have, and I just Gott to drop them in to the structure and which then ended up being a chapter one, chapter two, chapter three each other and four of the book. Then I can sort of give all these answers to and apply these answers to so I started doing that and it's a suning. I hand all these great ideas in these topics. Go why it this is? This is just beyond your can write so much more about this. And when I was using I was literally had to reach out to it was okay, some of the members that I say, can I use what you've written and drop it into the book, and then you want to talk to me a little bit about the background to this challenge that you had, and then what the outcome that you that you had was what we said to do. Did that work? And a lot of it was like yeah, it's brilliant, really, really helpful, you know, and and it you know, I've now gone and taken your advice and put it into other areas of my my partchick practice was but it so so we had, like always, I know we had about fifty people who are part of the revenue collective who had each one had a different topic and we run an answer and I was I just started with that in this in this framework, and then it really took on a journey. You know, I think, well, actually, you know I I mean I'm quite good at this stuff without, without past. Of you got a Modestiad of thing, but I'm not yet a certain areas worry. I'm not about no needs and EXPA and I live in I live in this world that sits kind of a one side the revenue leader, and I had this old world there and then I have this other world that sits in in partnerships and alliance community and there's some amazing people. They're Mike Nevin, who runs a blime's best practice, and he bout Shart, now the grand another. You know, it's a really good big names, very strategic minded thinking people and I said we'll let you know I get a talk to Mike about some of these this get. What are they say about that? So I started open the door and putting all these topics there's they well, what would you have done in this situation? How do you've done that? So like this is brilliant. You know, I that most of them written a book themselves and they said we'll look. Yeah, why don't I just kind of collaborate a little bit on you on this? And but my thoughts in as well as to as to how we can answer some of these challenges that these individuals have got. So getting some real academic and some really good industry expertise on it and people I wouldn't never really thought of connecting on a one to one level historically, and this kind of book has been a motivators do that. And then, through their then started to you started talking from real academics, like university academics, and then those who actually run their own business themselves around behavioral psychology, you know, like the GC index, and they then who runs that and applying some of the methodology around the or the Adal Psychology, around how teens work effectively together, but not just how teams were expected together within your own organization, but when you start marrying organizations together and putting people together from different companies and how veil could work together and find the balance in the behavioral science around you know, how can they effectively make an impact in what they do, like just getting not this thing lunch, but the people as well,...

...and they would putting on it. So finally, it was all kind of really taking of for this word of his own, and I ended up being as conductor of information and obviously applying my some twenty years in in partnerships to try and put some sense around all this created genius and academic genius that was just coming in. It's my inbox and on the on the Google Docs manuscript that I that I shared. So it was yet great, you know. So I like that. I like pay full credit of writing every single word that's in the book, but there's been a's been over fifty, two, a hundred collaborators that have been being putting on it. Well, I think that's such an interesting point because I I when you go out, when someone goes out with the the concept of I'm going to write a book, and no doubt it is a massive feet. Regardless of whether you know you're the sole contributor or there are several contributors, it can fuse that you have to be the one that has all the answers. And what I love about what you did is you may be the storyteller, you may be the beacon for help. Is came together, but you're also saying that you know, if the goal of this book is to share the how to s, the nitty gritty behind the scenes, then I'm going to rely on other people's stories as well, and so I think that for anybody that's, you know, exploring with that journey of writing a book or going down that journey, to know that there are multiple ways to have this come to life, I think that's pretty powerful and, and let's not minimize your role here, though, of being the one to the mouthpiece, so to speak, to be able to tell those stories. That, to me, you know, it's there's such a care that has to come with that too, because you are using other people's, you know, experiences and narratives and being able to make sure those are authentic and true and that you're carrying that through correctly and you know with integrity. That that also is a big weight, I think you always said, I throughout the whole process, and trust me, it is in the words of M Ross, who write, who write? WHO's Pietas right? I borrowed as well, but he he's written a couple of books, and he said, you know, walking book is, it's not sprint, it's a it's a marathon and you just got to keep yourself going. My I had this big, like a kind of two piece of paper on my war had my goals, although why am I going to finish this. Why am I going to complete this? You know what's going to get me through it, and it was a lot of it was to do with the challenge that covid has. It's they are the revenue leaders who have the hardest job. Owning revenue of the organization have to be the hardest job and making success and long term tenure at that role is is is a rocky roads, you know, and you need as much, I mean it's as possible and those that fail fell couldn't for for full. Pretty hard and your mental health is an issue. So so I did want to I wanted to raise money from mental health and the charity mind. So all proceeds the book will go there. But also that kind of sense of giving back. I think what's our purpose, you know, in life like we've learned all this stuff. Give back. I'm kind of IM on the back end of my career now there's a new work force and the new dynamic coming in, looking for new ways and leadership to do business, and if partships can be part of that, then I've done my job. Taken the discipline of partships, offer scrap peep and made it part of part of the way that businesses work today and Hallelujah. And if I can, I can give that back to business. I give up that. People Ben then brilliant and then finally, it's just probably my own my own bloody minded. This quite odity to say, been but it's a OCD like a start that I'm going to down. Well, got to finish Shit, you know. So, yes, I thought it up in the morning till the eleven at night for two weeks flat, three weeks flat. Sometimes it's trying to get the writings, the editing done. The other way I would have done it with with kind of these goals that were hanging off the wall. And you know, we see Sam Jay kids and pump blacks and two people. I've got to cool out where we're pretty motivating saying, oh yeah, it's pretty to keep going, keep going, somebody stakes. I have that kind of sponsors to what I was doing as well. Yes, I think that you know what you were just saying. They're around the commitment to yourself creating an environment in which you can be successfully right. You set forth to do the same, but you had the mentors and allies in your corner. You gave yourself, you know, a purpose. There were goals. Did you gravel with any fear? You said that you're you know you you have this commitment to follow through. You mentioned a little OCD there. I have found, I'll talk speak to me personally, that the ability to be creative can sometimes be stiffened by the fear of failure. And...

...this is such a creative endeavor into your points a marathon. It's, you know, mental strength going through that. And was there any point prayer to starting where where you were paralyzed to start, or I'm just curious what that was like for you. Pretty Cut. I think everybody stuffed, seems right, and I didn't care at who you I with the boldest person in the world. Everyone of the stuffed demon mean. I now that I've like to think I've a bit of an adventure. Are On sports billy. You know, I played rugby as a sixteen. I play for England. I'm a massive yachts when I've sailed. I've got the Pacific in a bod, yachts around Australia and you what have you. I've lived abroad and I've kind of be very gun home you certain degree and be a little bit rescue. What I taken and done it with confidence. But I have the for short and I have a little chip in my head that says, you cannot do this. This is this is where your way over your head here. You're going to be a laughing stuff. Who's going to want to read what you've got to all these sort of all these demons that play any head, and I I draw to and and you really got to look it up. So there's a there's a guy called Peter Stevens who does the ten minute stand up on Ted talks, if you've ever ever seen that. We wrote a book called Paradox and it's been around a while, but it he trained some of the some of the toughest Olympic athletes and he was the psycho psychologist to the, I think the England cycling team and the London Olympics, and his take is well, just imagine you. You know you. You're in the finals in the Olympics, you want your bike, you're ready, waiting for the gun to start, and what's going to your head? It's like, am I good enough for this? Am I get can I do this? And the only failing is it is you. What's in your head, what you need to the thought process behind that, putting that chimp away and thinking logically about it and say I've done the training, I know what I'm doing. I spent hours on my bike, you know, perfecting why I am there's no reason why I shouldn't win this. And it's just trying to put those demons away and creating some logic to say now, actually, I answered at what I do and I think I can make it from and that's the trajector in it's maintaining that that process of thought. Now, when you do write a book right, you do finish it, you've got to have someone to read it and and it's at it's a bad point where you say I really opening up my song here to everything I've written and having somebody look right in and take your good look and going and, you know, casting any judgment that they want based on the words that I put down. You know, I remember I did. I was on about my like twelve edit this as the manuscript and I hired the editor called Bud Williams, did the did book for our Ross potics will revenue and I remember giving him money. So he can't it's gonna be good. I can't and I'd be. I hadn't really shown it to anyone. I've had some people kind of collaborate only and I'll be doing stuff, what have you, but I hadn't really had an expert look at it. And I remember either fear I had a giving some he's going to destroy me. He's going to destroy me. You know, when I when I gave it to him, they came back in fair enough. He did know he did. He was pretty brutal with with what he said in response to to how but was constructed when I thought it was in a perfect form and I had to pay with God after week. Come with God. He's absolutely taught me. If put told me apart and he said no, actually, you know, I'll go the so so. Actually, it's just the way I that's just the way I write. I think he's done a really good job. You about age so there. Actually you've got structure. By talked to loads of creative geniuss in what book. They've got no structure what they do and they're all over the place. But I think you're about age there. You've got a really good job. I was like, Oh my God, you know me to go have like a bottle of champagne. To get that from an editor amazing. Yeah, so that was a that was a really good feeling and I was like yes, I turn like I thought, yes, I have all this knowledge of my head. Yes, I can put it down and paper. Does it make any sense to a reader? Make sense to me. But you're thinking about a third party. You think about where this book now is gone. I mean I'm getting both days of a people who I work with showing like send to be pictures of...

Ben with the book in like South Africa, sold across France, Germany, Australia. The biggest market so far is the UK. Seconds is us. Where it's going. I think about a hundred and seventy books now have been sold in the last two and a half weeks. To think people will run the world of picking this up and now reading it and now costing free judgment on it, which is kind of a little bit it's quite dorm thing. But I've had ten five star reviews on Amazons. They thought which some people who bought the book and I hadn't prompted them anything. So that that's made me feel very, very good and maybe giving me a little bit confident, probably about myself. And I have a comments abent those demons. So I want have well, I I think your brave as hell. I think you're daring. Greatly right, you're in the arena, and I love that quote as well, and so I am. You're an inspiration to me and I think that's so many people, especially in this community right you know, as I've started to do this podcast and meeting a lot of our leaders and members, these people are so driven, they're they're curious, they're hungry and not you know, I think the stereotype as revenue leaders is that you're hungry for money, and when I'm actually finding is that you're tenacious and that it's that tenacity that helps you get the byproduct of Avenue. But you're driven by so many more things, and so I have a strong feeling that this community is full of people who have book ideas, business ideas, anything that requires you to be incredibly vulnerable, put yourself out there, risk it failing, and and my hope is that hearing your story, especially during a time when a lot of the world might not have taken something like this right to you know, Covid is represented such a unique moment in time for so many of us, and I think for you to take that and be bold and do that simultaneously while having a family, while your wife went back to school. Those are those are big who read back to nothing. Yeah, you're insipration for me for sure. Well, I know how sad that, but I do think it's got to he's got to keep going forward, keep going forward, you know, and if a book you's in you, it is an amazing thing to do. It is a legacy that you'll leave behind, you know. So my you know, and somebody to me point out the other day that you know that's gonna this book is that I'm going to sit on the shelf in the British library. Way, you're my years and my kids, my kids get yeah, Lee, grandchildren, great grandchildren, all let the stuff. You know, that would be. Who was this guy, that brain, you know, this this in between date of and day? Who Died? Dash in between? Who won't he and and they can get up and now. Well, actually, he needs you kind of do something about polership, which for me is, you know, it's a legacy and if you're going to, whatever your reason is, the doing it, whether you're tenatius or not, it's probably do what kind of character should you be if you're going to if you're going to write a book? But I think everybody can he's got at the time and the will power to do it, because there are highs and life and you know, if one of the traits tenacity, then tactic, I think you know. You ask me today just to write, to write a book, I think he's going to be enthusiastic and have a little bit self that they yeah, there's there's a great book that I've I've recently started reading. It's called the war of art, not the art of war, which is also popular, but the war of art, and it's all around exactly what you just said. It's the ability to get started each day, that it doesn't have to be perfect and you don't have to complete at all, but the ability to just have the discipline to start and follow through, and that sometimes is the biggest challenge when it comes to art and creativity. Matt what's next for you and what's next for the partnership principle? Is there? Is there a part too like are we? Are you now a serial author? What are we going to see from you, who so not of plans, lots of plans, I think primarily I've hooked on to this, this idea with a fellow or see member called Sebastian and head and cronus. He's a he's a bit of my partner in crimes for all of thee ever since my barked on this journey. The Basti wanted to do a knowledge council for the revenue collective in the in the realms of partnerships. He had a background of partial now chief growth officer for to see web index and he he's come on me on this journey as well as some other people from the alliance world and to macademics as well. This is this is...

...also being coined. The content of this has been coined for the curriculum for a masters in business at Warwick Leagues and Honystool University. So I might be doing a lot of little bit of lecturing there in partnership. So I'm really looking forward to I think you were Elon's got a book in them and everyone's got baby teacher in them as well, I think, any reason, but I think we've all come together and what we're looking at is true. How do we treat more of a kind of pact called the knowledge from this. So the partnership principle is really designed for the revenue leader who wants the scenario plan, budget, slow, PLA puntships with a bit of a budget, so or not with a bit of budget, the May be, but using tips and tricks. So I think what we're going to try and do is do maybe create a website, have a platform where people can in age with, have some educational institutions, do some podcast at some information about different areas and topics that are that are raised in the book. have lots of influential collaborators coming on board who actually can input into this world partnership so that we can create greater awareness of the discipline of partnerships and really goes go have some expert solve some of the challenges that that revenue leaders leaders have and all the typical they have. So this kind of form there everybody can be gage. So really early day starting to talk about that. Watch this space. Something might some might be coming up that. And you know, I I really hate see on my own work, enemy, I really am, but I do see another book and I'm I think it's it must be like when you get a tattoo and you have a tattoo and you think looks great, I'll I could do it another tattoo. It might it get I think it. What's your really want? It comes a bit of an addiction. So it does take time, granted, but but I'm thinking of kind the next level up. They I'm moving. I've got my partnership division going. I might have employed a channel managing now full time. I've got my kind of ecosystem working at the moment. It's kind of David and glide methodology that I talk about, but and it's running. And now I want to invest any infrastructure and invest in the officer get with the quite ready and the kind of way. That's what I wanted to do with with Signalavia. where I move now is to take very much the methodology and all the kind of imtelligence around the input within the book and apply that. But then now look with with the investment that Signalavia has had, look at really started to build out a proper enterprise ready partner model which they can take the market across the globe and they go go, let me just go global now. So to that that's the intent and maybe basically success that that maybe there's I love it and I think that you know. I just in our brief conversations and some of our precall it sounds like this is the start of your knowledge share. But to your point, there's the building on that and I am grateful that we have you as a member of the community and I'm grateful that you shared your story today and you, as I said, inspired me to be a little they're a little bit more greatly. So thank you for that. Good. They do it well that. That's our rap for today. This has been this has been a great way to spend my morning with you, I think your afternoon. So thank you for that and we'll sign off and see this community next week. Yeah, awesome. Thank you, Rene. Collective part of book. The money does go to the Mind Organization for those of challenged with mental healt. So fit support that great, great charity and that you if you do bought it, booth, please do leave a review and, if I will be necessary to people, isn't on Amazon? Is that the primary way? Just look up your name, Matt Bray and the partnership principal, and that's where they'll be able to access that. Yeah, just order talk in the slush. All the POLISHIP principal. Well, my name and and you'll see it there. It's got the MIC Lans Goo to hand touchain on the front cover. That got a backing of adggitable pubble complish it. So bought a book please, and raise money for a great call. Absolutely, Matt. Thank you and we'll talk to you again, hopefully as you begin to work on book number two. Yeah, well, all right. Thank you so much. Big Thank you to Matt Bray, the author of the partnership principle, for joining us today. This episode was brought to you by Sindoso. They deliver modern direct mail, personalized gifts and other physical impressions that make...

...your outreach more personal. All right, crew, that's it for today. This is Casey let cord in, your host, and thank you for joining the revenue collective podcast. See you next week. All Right, a little bonus addition here for our revenue collective podcast community. Matt and I just had some time, or we talked about really the journey of how he got to the book right and what the book was about and life experiences, and then he had ever riffing and we're like, you know, it's really frustrating. Not even knowing where to start if you want to write a book, and Matt was just sharing with me some some really tangible pieces around like how does one even sit down and say, okay, I'm going to write this book and I'm going to start today, and so we thought it'd be fun to do a little follow on. So if you're still listening, then you're getting the bonus episode here. Matt. Let's talk about the writing process one hundred percent, because I think that's one of the biggest blockers. Do you actually getting get? Where do I stop? How do I get this hold bout, this guy, and you can sit on that for deternity and not right a word. And I did a lot of research in before I started in how I'm going to do this, and there was a ton of informational line. There was self publishing, consultant forums, all that sort of stuff that give you all these top tips in the Luwa for you to use their services and pay an astronomical amount of money to have a mentor or a guide or something like that that, quite honestly, you don't need it. Save yourself the money by you can do it. So, but it's the starting right. So in itially one of the things I read when I was talking to research and borrowing a lot of research, is it was like say some time night and give yourself goals. Last number one. But why are you doing this? If it is money led, you're going to fail. But I say now, do it for money. You have felt in fact, very few authors actually make any money. So I got to sell five hundred and sixty eight books to break even, just to give you a just to give you a much in be it's done what you shared. So I'm excited for you that two and a half weeks in we're twenty percent ago. We're very Hallelujah. Right, you've got to go a month ago. So wonderful, right. But if don't do it for the money, do it for credibility. Do it because you want to further your career, you want to break out, go into consulting, you want to do it a drive money for a charity or somewhere. But but just don't do it for money. Right. There's so many other reasons. So say they've goals. Also say some time, I must get it done by them. Now. I had a compelling events which was I agree to start signavio on the seven September. So I had between what I decided to go the follow and then step away from from sales strips to kind of end of firlow go and covid and lockdown to start a signalvio. I had that. I had that space. So I had to get it done by then because when I started to go it I wanted to give all my attention to that. So that was my tiny compelling events. With that in mind, I could stop. So it was why I really was going to what was it going to write about? So I found mind mapping my chapters really important. To have your structure in your head with roughly how you how you want the outline of the book to go. So you'd have like your core subject and then from there you'd had your sub categories and then from there you have your spidergrams coming out and and all your thought process. And then is really just prethinking. Just write it down, write it down, work down, just sparring and to understand like as you can give yourself maybe a bust of thirty minutes or an hour and just do it and take a break. They come back and like a little bit later and have another gay. We just do that until you you've got like a chapters that you're happy with and big mind maps and just stick them on the wall. Right. There are different other methods you can apply, but I use that one. I found that really, really helpful. And then, now you've got your outline, you want to hit your core chapters first. You know roughly how you're going to you're going to do it now. This is the trick. Right, follow this right when you write just right, don't stop writing, just keep writing, writing, writings righting, right thing. If you you made a mistake, doesn't matter. To keep going and just right, right, right, right, right. Whatever comes is your...

...head, based off the past that you're following on your mind that. Just keep writing. Do Not Stop and edit as you go along. You'll go back to your edit and you'll lose your train of thought and will take you forever to get back on your train of thought and carry on the way you're writing. All right. It's a nightmare. So I and I fell into that track when I started doing it, but I took to write the core chapters, the preface and acknowledgements and all those pieces to be the best part of the months of just writing. That's your first kind of hurdle, but get it done there. Then you're onto kind of face too, and that's editing, all right. You got to edit, edit, edit, edit, edit at it and just carry on editing. And then you're going to find pieces that should slot and chat piece of chapter one should have been in chapter four and chapter three should have been to check the one. You're shifting around and you're changing the grammar and your dusting your eyes and crossing your teeth and getting really into the weeds and further into the weeds and furthers the weeds and try to make logical kind of cent of it all and what you've doing, and only when you're in a position where you're really, really happy. I was on my twelve edit and another thing that I did as well was I starts who I've bought it a cartoonist, because obviously business Bush a bit dull. So I wanted I had a cartoonist from a both famous magazine, is a friend of a friend who does cut into the private eye, the spectator, and he did I want to line up for was finding things and putting in cartoons of beings, just a bit of humor, and I employed an external creative artist separate to do the cover, the spine and the and the back cover. That's quite a science of the last actually. So I recommend doing that. But once you've got got all the kind of manuscript together in the Douney of ten or eleventh edit I was, then use a professional editor. You can go on to upwork. You can get those recommended to you. I said, I got recommended that Doug Williams by our Ross. However, you can go to upwork and there's loads of freelancers offering the trade on there and they will and they will help you at a reduced price. You know, you can get a good editor for about seven hundred two thousand dollars and then they'll do the copywriting, the proofreading, the editing, everything that you need to do. There's a fair I gave it to the editor and they came back and I mean it was brutal. WHO's brutal for a reason? You know he is. He's respond as were. Well, you've gone straight into a subject here without warming up the reader anywhere in previous chapters. The way you write is quite fractional, like it's like you're like you're not writing telling some of the story you're you're, you're presenting this, you have to change your sentence architecture. My referencing was diabolical. So there is a there are specific formats of referencing that you must apply for a bibliography, referencing the website, journals, articles, this sort of stuff that you have to apply in footnotes and end notes, and I got to I got a real brus like the backside on that one. But I yeah, that has been a time because the readers got to know where you've got that information from if they wanted to sue it further. So so there's always pieces and then there's a three or four runs with the editor on that really cleaned it up, and then he would then format it in specific formats, that kindle and paper back through Amazon. We use both Amazon self publishing, so that print on demand and kindle. They will take the royalties and else's that the printing class. But there you walk away from about thirty percent of the gross of just to give your hands up. And then there's another site called draft to digital that do every other digital bookseller in the in the world. That's kind of Apple Bookstore and lots of others. So it's in so now you have to reach a wide audience. So it's in every every Amazon domaincoms that UK got an Owl, but CEA everywhere other world, and then it's in every digital book set up around the world as well as there. And once that is done, that is your book. But you are out there and you are in the public domain and it doesn't stop there to suddenly there are people that come out the would work from all over the world who just want to chat and want to say hi and I've picked up your book and I started reading it really interesting. Any tell me here. So you find I did a bit of publicity on Linkedin and I probably should do a lot more of...

...it to be on it. But it does take a natural course of its own. But it depends how hard you want to go at the publishing piece, because I think the publishing and raising awareness your book, the marketing of theselves of it, is as big as the writing of it itselfs. So it doesn't stop when you finished writing it. It's what you do next and that's the journey that you're going to take if you write a book, and the kind of processes you you what I used, but I would thoroughly recommend you use and if I'm all that, you're to reach out to your linkedin and you got any question on that and more than happy to help you, because I'm all for people sharing their knowledge and giving back in our community of the art seat. I love that we went one step deeper, because that's the I think it's so many people, whether any creative medium, writing a book or even a podcast, it can feel overwhelming if you are not technical in that space, to be able to get started. So what I heard from you, if I had to do the Tldr, is that it is one doing some mind mapping and general research on how you might be in to structure a book. That was very helpful to you. You mentioned a lot about freewriting. Don't don't edit yourself as you go, but get the ideas out of your head into paper. You can always go back and then you know sort where concepts go. You mentioned twelve rounds of editing. was that that was you, and maybe immediate peer group. Is that what that looked like? That is me. That was then you went and got an editor and you were fortunate you had a personal contact that that had inroads into that space. But you've referenced you know, UPWORK or others websites in which somebody might be able to go find a third party to help with that process. Yeah, you will say that kind of TAT. You will take a lot of money, the kid a lot of people. I think. This is where these sort of experts or mentals in publishing or helping you write a book are out there, and these kind of self published with us, you know, and they'll charge you for to five thousand dollars for a series of one to ones. That would given period of time to help you through the kind of emotional roado coaster that you're going to have a run the book and now playing that. Yes, we have channels that you can sell your book through with other but you have to pay extra for that. They'll have an editor for you can that they would recommend, but you have to pay extra for that, you know, but they your guys and you can spend easily four plus grand you on one of these, these kind of mentals, which I think it's a complete waste of money. But for me anyway, you know, and I did it without one, I did a lot of research. So you thought, you know what, I can probably do this with self. I follow follow the process, got my goals, got my Mostivation, I got my mon Joe's just kind of just keep going, you know, I could probably do this and and I went for it. When I started started writing, it was just I think. So, I like right, right, right, right, right. She keep going to keep going, keep going, you know, and that's that. That was the odd I just do that. Keep doing that. I can get through it, and then I'll do my editing. I can keep doing the editing. You keep doing the of you keep going at it. I can do it, you know, and then use her her and the money. I say from going through one of these mentals, say five grand to I probably paid about a grand eight hundred. The cartoonist is probably the most expensive. He was about a thousand dollars for thirteen cartoons. So us for a friend the way you've got, you've got there with me. Say Yeah, and then be the desire. Only that creative office was about three hundred dollars and then the editor of the said was about it's not. I'm just to court back to one. That was probably yeah type of price, and I say three grand in the press more. Yeah, I think that that you know what I'm hearing here, is it? There are resources available finding a mentor for sure, or at least you know support systems that have been through this. I know you had that. This revenue collective community is a great one. You know, people reaching out to you if they want to get in touch. You mentioned linkedin email. What is Your What Is Your Slack Candle? My flat has. Oh, it's just about bright, I think. Yeah, just let me off on the other thiec me on the on the Roden Class Bat. Weicht say hon you know, excellent. Well, I, Matt, thank you for thanks for getting downe to the nitty gritty of what it's like to actually do the book, and I I'm excited to see what comes next and I'm hopefully excited to see how many other members begin to go on this...

...creative journey themselves. That's that's what my my selfish goal is, is to see a bunch of more people out there telling their stories. Yead it, give back, give me another spack. So it's all about exactly exactly. All right, crew, will things for tuning in for our our follow on. Matt Bray, the partnership principal. Go buy it on Amazon today. All right, thank you, thank you,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (229)