The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 13: Leading Our People Well feat Catie Ivey

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Leading Our People Well feat Catie Ivey, RVP of Sales at Demandbase

Toeepeeeteee Oet telloover one and welcome to theRevenue Collective PODCAST IM near Lanchost, Justin Welsh member of theLos Angeles Chapter of revenue, collective and inside of these episodeswe're going to feature ideas and conversations that are inspired byongoing discussions within the revenue collective community across the globeand inside of the RC slack channel. There has been a lot of talk recentlyaround how to lead our people effectively, not just coaching andmentoring, but doing so in a way that embraces and celebrates diversity,we're going to cover all of that and a little bit more inside of this episodewith our guest rvp of National Sales and Demand Base Katy Ivy before we divein with Katy a few quick notes. If you're out there listening and you wantto join revenue, collective visit revenue, collective dcom in Cli apply.Now. I also want to thank our amazing podcast sponsor out reach the numberone sals engagement platform outreach, revolutionizes customer engagement bymoving away from silod conversations to a streamlined in customer centricjourney leveraging the next generation of artificial intelligence. Theplatform allow sales rups to deliver consistent, rrelevant and responsiblecommunication for each prospect every time enabling personalization an scalethat was previously unthinkable. Okay, let's get the show started with KatyIvy. Our guests today is katy. Ivy Katy isthe regional vice president of sales at demand base, which is a leading, be tobe marketing platform, with deep expertise in MARTEC and leveragingtechnology to scale revenue teams. Katy spends a ton of her time these days,working with sales, marketing and customer success leaders to help drivesynergy across teams, Katy welcomed to the show thanks a much JS adjestinggreat to be here, yeah, it's great to have you and and before we kindof jumpinto the topic that we're going to discuss today. I I'd love to just learna little bit more about your journey to becoming the rvp of sales over atTomambas sure thing. It seems like a common thing that I hear quite oftenfrom sales leader these days, but I most definitely stumpled into sales. ICalle Myself, an accidental salesperson had a bit of a unique journey right outof high school. I ended up traveling working for a nonprofit for almost fiveyears. Studi political science thought it was going to go. I a very differentpath and then landed what it ended up being an amazing sales gig, but a veryinternational company found myself making cold calls literally day one. Itwas such an unexpected kind of turn of events, but it turned out probablythree to four months in that I was just obsessed. I loved the thrill the pace,the journey, the people that I got to work with a sense of building, buildinga team and being on a team and really have done sales, a texsales andprimarily MARTEC sales, UNTALES leadership. Really, since since thatday, I made a transition into leading teams relatively early. I think, partlybecause I had some experience precollege where I had been leadingteams. So most of my journey and my experience has been more an the leaders,Eid of the House as opposed to sales, which I think is maybe a little bitunique. Definitely, you know you KINDOF fall into sales accidentally, and Ihear that like from it's funny. Almost every guess that comes on the show islike I'm sort of an accidental salesperson, but they don't all. Havethat necessarily quick progression into leadership like you, like you did somesome folks take seven years. Some takes ten years, so you know, we've all hadto now do something even different where we're quickly progressing intoremote sales leaders. So I'm curious, how was that transition been been foryou so far? That is a good question, a d. This is the first time in my careerthat I've been managing a hundred percent remote team. I will tell you, Imiss being in an office something terrible and I absolutely miss workingwith customer space to face as well. So T's, it's been a challenging few months.It's interesting thinking back even to my slightly typical background of oftransitioning to the leadership so...

...quickly. I found the management side ofsales really really natural, but it took me much longer, I think, to feellike I was such a natural at the selling motion. So a lot of, if I think,of the first five years of my career, so a lot of time was spent focused onhow do I perfect those skills in the midst of while I'm running, larger andlarger teams and trying to you know, exud confidence in areas where I wasn'talways. You know so confident. The last three and four months has been a littlebit of that. A lot of what I feel like I'm so natural at is around creatingstrong cultures. I'm really good at Connecti, with people on a one on onelevel, grate at building relationships and identifying strengths and helpingraps. Do that and let's be Honust, that's much harder to do remote andover zoom. I certainly have some of that zoom fatigue. We all talk aboutTart of being on video for eight to ten hours a day, but have been verypurposeful at trying to identify. What are the things that I feel like make mestrong as a leader in a face to face team environment, and how do Itranslate those in a day in a day out, even as kind of the routine and the daytoday as changed so much yeah? It's interesting, I think. When Italk to people we always tend to sort of focus on what has become reallychallenging, with moving from being in person to being remote, and we alwayssay like. Oh I, some fatigue or hey, I'm kind, O tired to be on video forages ten hours. I think that that's totally understandable has anythinggone explicitly. Well, that's been surprising to you, has anything movingfrom you know in person to remote just like wow. This was actually easierremote than it is in person for you. So I love that question because, actually,yes for me personally, there's certainly some things that have beenalmost a big leap. Ford I feel like in my career part of it is I've taken alot more control over my calendar and how I spent my time, weall now being inan office environment. There's people coming out f the woodwork all the time.There's conversations that are constantly happening and the positiveis that a ton of that mentorship and knowledge transfer can happen in reallyauthentically in those settings. But it also means that you're pulled in amillion directions and it's very hard to dictate how you're going to spendyour time unless you've literally you know, lolk yourself in a comforce Roomoor behind a door somewhere so being working remote. I've certainly createdmore structure around how I use my time and even some really simple things likeWois Gong and I love spending time reviewing Gong calls and coming up withsome things that raps are doing really well or interesting things that we'rehearing even from customers, what we're seeing in the landscape, the marketfeeback we're getting on the product, and that's always something that is onmy agenda and there's a plan to do it. But you get polld in so many differentdirections that sometimes you know anything. That's not urgent. At thatexact moment sort of falls by the wayside. I think it's certainly beingremote has definitely allowed me to decide what is going to be importantversus urgent and making sure an deciding to get that the importantthings done, as opposed to just all the last minute things ot Papu yeah, youknow it. It really kind of interesting thought for me is, I feel the same waylike I I feel like I've, been able to sort of organize my time around what ismost important. What is most urgent that to me has come naturally, assomeone who's been working remote for a little while myself, how do you lookinto your team and find those folks on your team, whether they're frontlinemanagers, whether they're individual contributors? How do you find thepeople that are struggling to do the same thing now that their environmenthas been shifted? Yeah it s? It's a good question and my team's interesting'cause. I have a pretty big range. I have some folks that are relativelyjunior and have been K, inclosing roles, maybe for one to two years, and thenI've got other folks that have been doing it for ten years plus, and soit's there's some differences and some nuances there. The first thing when wedid some personality, assessnment tests really early during work from home.Just to understand in some of this I kind of intuitively thought that I knew,but I wanted to make sure I understood I even something as simple is: is thisperson an introvert versus an extravert? I E introverts get their energy frombeing alone, exroperts get their energy from being with other people, whichmeans when we're loct in our houses. The energy factor is a massivechallenge: Sosoer Sim things of identifying how people are wired andthen also really early on having one on...

...one conversations around talk to meabout how you like to use your time. What do you feel likeis going well andwhere are you getting stuck or wearing you struggling, and I certainlyidentified early on, especially some of those folks that were younger or thatdidn't have great work from home set ups, which a lot of my teams inManhattan, so that's a ton of them t didn't have great set ups. There weresome really simple things that I could help with, or do to try to remove someof those obstacles. Th. The goal was obviously to not micromanage in any wayand kind of create, as you must fit into the structure, but try to identifyones that were struggling mor in this new environment and to your pointreflecting on you know, how do I use my time? Well, what am I naturally good at?How does that translate into a remote environment? That's a lot of that. Justkindo has to happen. I think in a one on one setting. Definitely youmentioned something. You know there Whi ininteresting, which is like Yo. A lotof us are. This is the first time for a lot of us in remote and remote roles,and you know, let's be very clear: Twenty twenty has been an interestingyear in so many different ways. A lot of things are changing, I think goingremote is just one of them, but the world is continuing to progress inother ways. There's there's now a major focus on not just the celebration ofdiversity, but also taking action to build really diverse, high performanceleadership teams. So how have you focused on creating that environmentwithin your team, while also you know learning to go remote learning thesenew skills, helping your team? How? How is that? How are you doing that rightnow in your current day today? Yes, but there's a couple, I think pieces tothat question that are really relevant, obviously N. I love that you use thework interesting, which I use the same word for twenty twenty, but it's it'sbeen challenging on so many different levels, and this whol very I mean for alot of us a much more recent focus on diversity and some of what's been goingon around us has been really really confronting. So I guess the firstanswer to that question in terms of how we're tackling that or handling that,even just at the team and the one on one level, it's been having some reallyopen and really uncomfortable conversations with my we've beenreading a couple of books together, we've been doing somethingscollectively at Deman Bas as well just focus around what are the areas wherewe just really need to learn and identify what our biases may be andwhat the gaps are and the even at the company level identify what are areaswhere we absolutely need to get better and figure out how to we moreaggressively move in a more divers direction. In my own career, I focuseda ton on getting more women into sales and women into sales leadership, andthat's certainly been kind of my lane that I've played in when we talk aboutdiversity, but recognizing over the last number of months at that's, it'stoo small of a lane like th the conversation our on diversity just hasto be so much bigger and and for a lot of us, the starting point is beingwilling to to have those tough conversations in environments wheredoesn't feel quite so natural. I can't remember now I I got so passioneteabout that topic. There was another layer to that question and I think Itook it in a different direction. No, it's! Actually. It was really a greatanswer, but it opens me up to something else that I'm thinking about. I Iinterviewed Danella Blar. She is t the head of sales over at Choppafi a coupleof weeks ago, and she was talking to me a little bit about women in sales, andone thing that we were discussing is you know she said often times there'sthis idea, that women can be a bit more timid in raising their hand or or youknow, using their voice powerfully, and I don't mean to paint with a broadbrush, obviously not not not all women by any means, but she she had said thatto me during the podcast and she was working on really getting her voice outthere and taking charge that'd be curious as a a strong woman in sales.How do you feel as though this this remote sort of shift in twsenty twenty?Has that been you know empowering to women in sales? Has that been helpful?Has that been hurtful? I would love to sort of understand it from from astrong woman in in sales leadership's perspective yeah. It's it's a goodquestion because I could argue both sides of that there's, certainly inneed now to be much more vocal and to think broader and bigger than just yourcurrent role, and I think that's true...

...for all of us and to your point evenjusyour conversation with Danielle she's, absolutely correct thathistorically andpart of its literally how in our society, how we raise littlegirls different than little boys e boys, bread to be risktakers and take chances,and it's okay. If you fall down and strake your knee and girls are bred tobe cared for and project this image of perfection, and so that translates intothe fact that, as fenows we are often more redisent to put up our hand for anopportunity. For example, if we don't feel a hundred percent qualified, maybewe're not sure if we have all of the right things to say or all the rightthings on our resume to your question around this remote world. I think it'screated some great opportunities. Certainy I've been leaning into thesebig time in terms of just working harder to build my personal brand beingvery cognizant of building relationships online through channels,Likelington and twitter, publishing more content trying to be more vocal,but I notice, even in myself, there's absolutely that you know mentality orthe trap that I fall into of. I'm not sure if this is quite good enough orI'm not sure. If I have quite the expertise to speak out on these certaintopics- and I think that's one thing- that's been interesting. I've spent alot of time, obviously during the season analyzangling den and some ofwhat I'm doing there and recognizing what a massive gap there is in reallystrong female leadership voices, particularly in sales, which I is verymuch Ko te place that I play in an pot of that. I think that's come down tothe fact that, because we are a bit more hesitant to Telinin and put outcontent until we feel like it's packaged up well enough and it's youknow something that we've been researching and learning about for thelast five years to have this perfectly crafted perspective, and that seems tobe a little bit different for for the opporisite gender again painting withbroad strokes to use your words sure, absolutely a as someone who know Iwrote a newsletter for ever a year just on on really strong content on Lintoln-and I I remember it was part of my goal- was to shine a light on a diversepopulation of folks who were turning out great contint en Lington, and I canjust remember scrolling through my feet and just saying wow there's! No, not asmany you know, vocal female sales leaders on on the Linkdonnis, as Iwould love to see, and so I'm really glad to hear that. That's somethingthat that you're leading into 'cause. I think there's there's just such amassive opportunity there, so that that's really awesome to to hear andI've seen your stuff. So congratulations, that's awesome. I'dlove to maybe transition a bit more to the tactical side of people. Leadership,and I know that, like you and I had connected before the pod cast and thatyou sort of have this ethos or this Montra that you were sharing with me,which was like managing the you know the whole person versus just managingto the numbers and I'd love to know. Can you tell me a little bit about moreabout where that came from? I guess? First of all, and then how do you dothat specifically yeah, so in terms of where it came from anything always as apeople oriented leader and probably honestly, as someone that struggled atsales early on in my career, I have a lot of empathy for folks that feel,like they're working, really really hard an struggling to put some of thedots together. So one of the things that I've focused on really from day,one is focusing on strengths. Before I focus on gaps and weaknesses and againwe're talking like on a one on one level, I h with raps that have workedfor me and leaders that have worked for me, and so I think that has helped meand a craft and awareness of that whole person n, whose this individual, whatdo they bring to the table? What's that kind of hidden superpower that uniquething about who they are that, if I can figure out how to harness it and getthem to really lean into that strength, I know it's going to make them betterin all the other areas and help offset some of those, maybe other areas wherethey're, not quite as strong at doesn't mean we don't pay attention to thethings that need to improve, of course, but making sure I understand in what'sthe big picture. What's that person working towards whete der, they want tobe, and not just the classic. Where do you see yourself in five years? Butreally you know what gets this person out of bed every single day and andmakes them want to be great at their job? I trying to spend time on that,and I think that's probably ties into your earlier question too around maybesome of the positives or things that theast have potential to come out ofthis strange or interesting season that we're all living through. I thinkthere's certainly been even more of a...

...requirement to take a step back andmake sure that I'm managing to the individual as opposed to this one sizefits all because there is such a diversity in every person and why theydo what they do and what makes them great at what they do. So I think thatthat's another thing with this cobet environment that at least I'vepersonally focused a lot on Li e. What are the things that, in a new sellingenvironment, what are the GAPSR OU? And I all know the people that can walkinto a room and own that room and literally build trust in an instant,and that doesn't happen the same way over soon. So so, how do we compensatefor that? What are the other things that that can work with that individualto do to learn to build different strength and lean into that samestrength in different ways? So I think that's probably part of maybe wherethat that ethos or that kind of Montreking came from from myperspective, Oand, you know I heard like hey you, K, ow t there might besome folks in your team who are struggling or who aren't being able toput the pieces together. You know right away, is they come into a new salesenvironment and I'm curious with with Cogat in the mix? Has Your stylechanged around that particular person that person that is struggling thatperson that is not putting the pieces together? Are You more empathetic? Isit business as usual for you with you know, performance. You know managementand things like that. I'd love to hear the impact on simply how you thinkabout the struggling folks on your team right now. There definitely has to bemore of a layer of empathy and at least an a cognizance and a willingness todig in and try to understand at a different level. I think we also, wecan't lose sight of the fact that the last four months that we've livedthrough is just massively stressful for not just the people that work for us,the people that were selling to they know every element of human interaction,has shifted and there's so much uncertainty and that pace of change isso incredibly different. So I, I absolutely don't think, there's thecapacity for just business as usual. It doesn't mean that we are lack and notpaying attention. I certainly have ou o very clearly outline theres, it'spretty clear. What threats at work on my team have to do to be successful. Weunderstand all the leading indicators, the numbers. What is the funnal need tolook like, but we've also had to recognize and IAVE had to recognize asa leader that there's been a lot of things that we've faced in a thinkFebruary march April, things that are very outside of the control of thatsalesperson. So I've been much more cognizantd, I think more than ever toidentify what are the things that that person's doing well. Are there certainthings that are working or there are there things that we can identify inways that I can showcase that individual? That might not just beabout the numbers, because I mean let's face it, there's a lot of things andI'm really lucky to sell into a space. That's still spending money in themidst of Covad. Some sales teams do not have that luxury right now, whenthere's things that doesn't matter how incredible their team is, there's justgoing to be a slow down of the revenue side of t e, the House, and I thinkthat we absolutely have to identify that and and take ownership there.Lt'slt's take a look at the opposite and of the spectrum, so you knowthere's more empathy. It can't be business as usual, but there are clearperformance expectations for folks who are struggling during during cobed.Let's take the person who has been struggling, you put them into a remoteenvironment and suddenly maybe they're that introver. Maybe they don't get theenergy away around people in the in the office and maybe they're thriving athome. What's your personal thought on how this change is moving forward? Ifyou see someone on your team, who's who's really doing a great job, youknow at home working through coved. Do you bring them back to the office? Ordo you start to change the way you think about flexible work about remotework in the future? Yeah e? We definitely changed the way that we'relooking at it. I personally e Selfishly, I love being in an office. It'sdefinitely the environment that I personally thrive in, but there's nodenying that not every person on my team is wired. The same way might havehad countless conversations with seller sales leaders, marketing leaders a lotof folks that their team is as productive, if not more productive. SoI think it's all about open lines of communication understanding. What folksthat work for you need during this season, but I think we have to relookat how what we think about reremote work holistically. I agree I you know Idid a survey at the last business that I wasat and as someone who's worked...

...promotely before my my thought was wasgoing to be that ninety five percent of people would respond and say we want towork from home and that just wasn't the case. You know most especially some ofthe newer or younger sales professionals on the team. They missedthat COM roderie. They missed that in the office, and I just I just wasn'texpecting that. So to me, that was a huge learning. Are you seeing that alarge percentage of your sales team or a small percentage I'd be curious tohear from you over demand Bass? Do you think the team wants to thrive and comeback into the office? Most of my folks want to be in the office. I don't thinkthat they want a nine to five five days a week expectation to me in the office,but percentage wise, probably eighty percent of my guys want to be back inin office. So interesting to me. I just imagine that, after aftr afterhaving worked in an office for a long time, but that that's neither H re northere really appreciate work in the most fun office possible. Maybe it justmeans my office is really really amazing. Most likely that's awesome.Well, thanks, thanks for sharing sort of how how you think about you knowremote work, how you think about empathy right now how you think aboutdiversity? I think that's that's really really interesting, stuff and andreally powerful caty, and you know we're we're kind of getting ready towrap up here, which means we do something really cool at the end ofeach of these episodes, and it's called our quick fire five and it's just fivequestions. Were we try ING, get off the cuff kind of real answers fromexecutive revenue leaders like yourself ready, I'm ready awesome. I know thatyou're, a big reader, tell me about a book that you've read that has changedyour perspective on life. Oh, I just read a book called Waking Up White thatwas recolutionary as revolutionr. It was just a very different andinteresting perspective on a white woman similar to myself recognizing alot of areas of bias and perspective around how she was raised and how thatframed, how she saw the world very cool. What is your most controversialperspective on startup culture? Something that you hear you know peoplesay all the time that you think is just you know, maybe B us. I think we talkabout potential and high potentical people way way too much. When you say we talk about people withhigh potential too much. What what exactly do you mean ies into a different both had I readrecently, it's called nine lies about work and basically the lie that theybreak down, or one of them is all about this concept of potential, and we Li onthat as a crutches leader. So often that we figure out there are certainpeople that have more potential than others and we pour a lot of resourcesinto them as opposed to really breaking down. What is great, look like in a lotof different ways and putting people in the environment where they arenaturally built to drive very cool, interesting nine lies at work isonsonine lies about work. I think noin lies about work. Okay, cool I'll haveto pick that up. That sounds really interesting. You're going to clothe areally big deal with your team, and you need one song, a song that just ampsyou up and pumps you up. What do you plan? Who runs the world? Girls? Nice, verygood? What is something that Katy Ivy isworld classing? I am really really good at managingsellers early in their career, helping them build kind of that first layer ofconfidence and learned the building walks of a great selth career lookslike that is an awesome answer, because I truly think that a very underratedpiece of your sales career's momentum- and I think that if you can succeedvery early in your career, that is the momentum that a lot of folks need tohave a very lengthy and successful career in sales. That's great to hear rlastly kind of give the audience yourlife motto or guiding principle that they can take home with them inYousestoday wow you sai the best for last. My my life motto. I think people areincredible. I think that people have the capacity to do so much more thanmany of us accomplish that many of us play way too small Iman people that wemanage playway too small and part of...

...our job as leaders is to open up thatperspective, anchallenge them toany more Col. you heard it the are leaderschallenge our people they're playing too small, but by the way I tend toagree with you m. You know, as as someone who's managed sellers for thelast. You know. Eleven years, I've been absolutely shocked at what people cando, especially ND, not not to go down that rabbit hole but especiallygeneration, some of the the sellars that I've brought into some of theorganizations recently they are so so many light years ahead of where I waswhen I was that age or that point in my career. So I'm with you. I think Ithink folks are only getting better so kitty. This is. This has been reallyexcellent, to tell everyone how they can get in contact with you if theywanted to reach out and have a conversation or learn more about youyeah sure, so, I'm fairly active on Lingdon. As I mentioned earlier, I'mKaty Ivy, it's Katy with a C, so I'm usually pretty easy to find lot toengage and have conversations N, Lington's, probably the best channelalsomenif folks on the revenue collective want to get a hold of youinside of the collective. What Your Slack Handle, I'm Katy, Ivy and WeistAwesome Katy! Thank you so much that was a ton of fun learned. A lot had alot of fun chatting with you. Thank you so much for coming on with me today andstay safe out. There ananappreciate it.

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