The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 11: "Everboarding" Your Employees for Maximum Impact feat Leon Hassid

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"Everboarding" Your Employees for Maximum Impact feat Leon Hassid

Toe etpete OE, tee e, O tewhat's peveryone and welcome to the revenue collective podcast. I am your launchhost Justin Welsh member of the Los Angeles Chapter of revenue, Colectiveand inside of these episodes were going to feature ideas and conversations thatare inspired by ongoing discussions within the revenue collective communityacross the globe n inside of the Slack Channel. There has been a lot of talkrecently around on boarding, especially in this challenging time that we're allgoing through right now with many of us on boarding folks from home. For thefirst time we are going to cover that in a little bit more inside of thisepisode with our guests, sals anablemen and training leader at Security ScoreCard Leon Jasid before we dive in with Leon a few quick notes, if you're outthere listening and you want to join revenue, collective visit revenue,collective dcom and simply click appline. Now I also want to think ouramazing pod cast sponsored gone. The number one revenue intelligenceplatform for remote sales teams. We are super thrilled to announce a strategicpartnership in which wil be bring you the best events, content, research andspaces to engage with your peers and to kick it all off. They are sponsoringthe revenue collective podcast. We will be bringing you new stuff every monthto not miss out stay up to date on the latest collaborations at Gong, dot, io,slash, CARC, okay, let's get the show started with Leon Husi. Our gues today is Leon. Hisid Leon isdesales enablement and training leader for Security Score Card, the world'sleading security ratings company. He is responsible for the company's salesenablement in training program which ensures that the revenue organizationis equipped with the right skills and information at the right time so thatthey can sell more, better, faster and hopefully not cheaper. He has anextensive background in sales. Having been a player coach for the majority ofhis career Nin, the last sixteen years he has implemented numerous NABLEMENTprograms for organizations like Deloit, Gartner, K, PMG and others Leon welcometo the showman great to have yon just then it's awesome to be here awesome. So to start I'd love to justhave the audience get a little bit of what we call your origin story, thebackground and how you got to your current role at security score card. Soso tell us about that: Lim Yeah, absolutely Um. So I was actually bornand raised in Athens, Greece and it was always kind of the goal to move to the.U S at some point and you know Didhigh School Undergrad. There I went to thearmy, which is mandatory in Greece for a couple of years. I was in the airforce, but I never really saw a plane. So we can talk about that if you wentlater, but I spent three years with the Loy, the professional services firm andthere I kindof got my feet wet in the marketing and bus development functions,and I was lucky enough, obviously deloy the global organization to gettransferred to the global headquarters in New York City. I have multiple rolesthere, it's very common for people to rotate, but I think what was the mostdefining moment for my career was when I started playing that rule. Youmentioned that playercoach, where I realized that I was getting even moregratification, thand satisfaction when I was helping multiple people closedeals versus me, closing them myself and that's where really my enablement,an training genes were cultivated, so I did that for Deloy for a number ofyears, then, as you mentioned, for a couple of startups and large corpsuntil nine months ago, I landed at agretiscore cart and have been havinghell of ha time ever since great. So you know you're responsiblefor equipping the revenue teams with the the right skills and the rightinformation to perform soyou. No. If, if I were to walk into security scorecard, as I new sales employee, you know...

...talk to me about how that process ofequipping them with that skills and information starts yeah, absolutely soright now, as soon as you get into the organization, I would say that thefirst four weeks is where the the magic happens. I think you know atSecurityscorcord. Personally I recognize that traditional boarding isoverwhelming and I'm not going to sh shy away from that fact. A lot of ournew hires are drinking through that firehost for the first four weeks andthey go through a lot of material, most of it, its self paste. So they need towatch videos or they need to watch videos and ask answer questions or theyneed to record themselves doing a pitch or Theyn need to make sure that theyconnect with the rights tat holds within their organization, and we keeptrack of that. But we recognize and have planned for the fact that afterthose first four weeks go by, we still need to have some principles ofcontinuos learning happening. So I I personally think it's just unrealisticto expect them to absorb everything in that short of mine o time. I think,there's a there's a staff out there. I apologise. I don't really know whereit's coming from, but it says that close to ninety percent of what youlearn in the first three months on a new job is forgotten and as a salesenablement leader that'. That is just scary to even think about. So that'swhere I I' started talking about the concept of Everboarding, where it's notjust about on boarding and ramp. I view everboarding as snacking it's moreabout the idea that I, as a sales enablement leader, need to give my repsa solution when they needed the most got it so you're. Just one guy, thoughright so you know you're the head of anableman. How should an enablemantinbe built out in order to you know, allow reps to quote unquote as you callit snack right 'cause. I got to assume that as the company gets bigger andreps become more tenured and they need more information, n t faster thatthat's got away on one person. How do you build a team out and what are thekeyroles that are necessary in order to have a really powerful enablementprogram? It's about the roles, but it's also about the evangelists and therelationships you build internally. So you're right, just one person there'sno way that they can check the box on everything that needs to happen. So youneed to create extensions of yourself within their organization, people thatsing the same song from the same songbook that you've crafted? U andthat's really where I spend the majority of my time. Initially. Whatare those opinion leaders, those change agents, if you will, that will be ableto take whatever message on giving the sales community and Hond in on it andmake sure that the reps are are following within security score cardsaves elimblement is part of Product Marketing, which is larger than justone person right now were like four people, so there definitely areamplifying all the efforts that, as a sales entableman a traiding leader, I'mtrying to instill in their organization. So, yes, I may be one person withouttitle and the'r kind of in their business card, but there's three fourpeople that were part of the same team and and trying to leave and breth salesin enblmen every every day, so that our reps have all the information they needas quickly as possible. So to your point earlier, on, sell better, morefaster, hopefully now cheaper. But to me the difference maker always is, andhas been within security score card to have those Evangelis within eachfunction that matters even outside of sales, so that they're they'reamplifying my message and if even if you're, just one person, you can stillget the job done, got it, and you know it's reallyinteresting, because you mentioned a stat earlier in this, where you saidsomething like ninety percent of what folks learn in their first, you knowfew weeks or or whatever on the job gets lost. How do you think about thisever boarding stuff that you talked about and what I mean is I agree thatpeople have to be constantly learning...

...that I would assume tat over the courseof time. All your reps are different. All your departments are different. Allyour teams are different. How do you ind your team understand how tostructure that everboarding process? Where does that content come from? Howdo you build something that really maps to making sure that your reps aregrowing over the course of their career? Just in its a great question an I can'tclaim to have a complete command overdoing that, and I think it that hasbecome exponentially more difficult in the last three months, given that wernow all remote like previously, I would be able to talk to at least ten fifteendifferent reps on any given day understand, what's happening in withtheir quarter other other hitting their number or not. Why aren't they if theyaren't talk a little bit deal making with some of the biggest deals theyhave in their pipeline? So it was very easy to with Justin time learning ifyou will and real time coaching to provide that snack for them to chew on.I actually have an impact very very quickly. Nowadays, though, you can't dothat you can have that water cooler conversation for like five minutes inorder to get get a feel of what's happening out there in the fieldvirtual field. If you will, you need to set up prezumiting for thirty minutes,definitely not worth anyone's time to do that. So I think we've usedtechnology to enable us to do that, and Gong and high spot are the two of thetechnology we use. So Gong has a lot of functionality that allows us tounderstand what reps are doing. Allow us to track that report on it andprovide real time coments. So for me right right now, I'm spending, probablya hundred and fifty percent more time listening to Gong calls. So I canprovide their real time coaching and when I feel there's an action itemresulting out of ther conversation that a rep was havving. I can thene scheduleand react and provide the content that a rab may be missing or provide andotup the diversion of the talk track that they need to start using mor of ormaking sure that they can get access to that biease of new collateral thatwe've created. So it's been a lot of reactive things that we try to do andthey have been paying dividends. But the other thing that that I believe hasmade a lot of impact is something we introduced really as soon as kinocorrentine happened and we used lack within security score ar we have thischannel called daily sailing tips, and I talked about earlier. However,boarding is about providing those snacks when the reps needed the most.So if, as a team and as a leader, I have a pretty good sense as to what ourrebs are struggling with, and this passquarter has been challenging byproviding small nuggets of information, whether that's a linkd to a gon call,whether that's a specific section to a new piece of market and collateral,whether that's a stat that I grabb from Lingtoln, maybe maybe you just imposedsomething that I want reps to know about small NA nuggets. That can reallyadd a lot of value in in that day, as they're ready to start their day goingto their calls. Usually, we post those nuggets at early in the morning, eightAghtm Amestern, and it gives them something to chew on before they gointo their day. I feel that that has made quite a bit of f difference.That's great and N. that's the real positive stuff! I see coming out of anablemant right, this sharing of data, the sharing of collateral, thisbreakdown of new news articles, let's talk about when when when things gopoorly, so I've also seen where you know you mentioned Gong, which is youknow the sponsor of this. This podcast an ind, probably my favorite salessoftware, because it allows my coaches to just become even better you're goingin and you're listening to these gong calls but you're the enablement leader.Now I'm going to assume that these raps also have a manager, I'm just in thesales manager. I like to coach my own way I like to listen in and givefeeback my own way to my reps. how do I work with a Leon tmake sure that youand I are aligned and giving similar?...

You know feedbacks of that they're, nothearing two different things from two different sources. How does that work h?It's a great point, great point and that's where building relationshipsreally kind o shines. If you don't have that understanding in advance as towhat the division of Labor needs to be with those team leads and those salesmanagers, you're doomed as soon as you start making that effort, it's notgoing to take you anywhere, quite frankly, you're probably going to makemore enemies than frends. So before going into any sort of coaching mode.If you will I've had conversations with each one of those leaders to understandwha, that division of Labor needs to be understand whether the main principlesand philosophies that were trying to instil in our reps, and I make it myjob. It's almost like my mo to stay consistent with that and not breakthose rules of he engagement. We talked about and work I company with fulltransparency. So if I'm doing, if I'm providing comments on a Gong Coll andI'm coaching, I'm not just going to share that with the rap the teamly, theMager will see that as well and they Kanno Pine in real time. So there's alot of that collaboration happening. Obviously, people mean well so goinginto it with that mindset. We're all here to help each other, so I haven'treally faced any problem with that, but it's absolutely key that if you'regoing to go into that effort, you need to have those team leaders supportingyou and you can only get there if youve spend enough time providing credibilityand making sure that you've created a good gerenal grant for yourself, whereyou're now been given that permission, if you will and when things go poorlywith that really I take that as a personal responsibility. That's on me!If the rap is concerned, then complaining that they're hearingdifferent truths from different sources than that's on me. I haven't done myjob. Well, communicating expectations. It hasn't happened yet it happened inthe past. So live Alearne! Absolutely, and you know I think,especially because your title is sales enablement, an training leaders, salesright, it's it's sort of easier to sit down with those sales stakeholders,those sales leaders and get by an and understand the division of Labor. Let'stake it outside the sales. How do you as the head of sales, enablement workwith departments like product and engineering or customer success tobetter improve the revenue team's performance? What does that look likeabsolutely so a little bit of a unique situation with in security score cardcustomer success is actually within the scope of my role, so I treat them as asan Edournal customer. In much the same way, I treat an inside sales rep or afield or a BDR. For that matter, training. There is different for sure,with C SSMs, our customer success bols. I definitely focus more on productknowledge and different role, plank scenarios when it comes down toonboarding, a customer or navigating a particular talk truck to understandproduct fit, but also what will the potential for upsell Bildhe so there'smuch more role playing an active, real live training if you will, with the sea,ascent versus a D, much more self pace, orientation with the field and insidesales, but you talked about some less traditional departments right. So howdo I collaborate with product and that's the beauty of being part ofProduct Marketing Product Marketing? Has that, as a main priority to buildrelations within the product and engineering parts of their organizationand therefore I have really really easy access and what we've bee spending themost time trying to perfect is how quickly, in what manner can we update the sales organization oneverything that's coming up from a feature standpoint from a productlaunch tandpoint, anything that that...

...organization is working on that thereps need to know sooner rather later, and we work on a couple of differentcadences different formats. Obviously, we needed to rinvent that entireapproach in the last three months, but there's there's regular trainings on amonthly basis right now, where we gather the entire sales organizationand in one hour on a monthly basis that listen to everything, that's going tobe ga in in a few weeks time, so they can learn about it. They can go then toMiticle, which is another tool we use to actually be tested for knowledge,retention, rehearse, perhaps different pitches that they need to record andthen, as soon as that feature may be generally available, they're ready togo out there and sell it and and use it to close more business and you knowattract more customers that way. So that's that's one direction, so that'sproduct, two sals! So hey this is what's happening in product. Let's getit to the sales team. Let's talk about the other direction, so sales ischatting with your customers more than obviously any other department. I I youknow customer success as well, but sails is on the front line talking toprospects talking to customers. How do you take that knowledge from the salesteam and as the enablement professional get it back to your product team todownstream impact? What types of products and services are being beingturned out by Your Company Yeah? Absolutely so, there's what I what Iconsider the holy grail of sales, it's the win loss debriefs, so I grew uplearning. This quote that one of my managers, a Cun instilld in me, win theloss so be regularly formally or informally will conduct we lostdebriefs on those deals that we, we feel warand that kind of attention, sothe feedback we get from customers and prospects on why they made the decisionthey made, is being fed up, fed back to product and engineering, and the salesengineering, I would think, is the arm that is primarily tasked. WITHOUTRresponsibility, ourselves. Engineers are all no Ol. This conversations,maybe they're not leading those conversations, but they hear prospectsand customers talking about the product. What more they would like to see whatthey don't want to see more of or what they don't like or like about aparticular new feature. It's part of their job description. If you will tobe feeding that information back to engineering a product for right now, Ican't say that has been one of the main Airas of moe responsibility, babysteps, meaning the sales namble indprogram didn't even exist nine months ago before I got here, so I think itmay be kind of h the wave to area. For me to explore so right now, it's it'srualy happening organically. That's great, and you know I come from an SNDBbackground, so we generally are selling a product of service that doesn'trequire a sales engineer and one of the things that I see that gets missedoften in the S mb enableman is not collecting that appropriate feedbackfrom your sales team in not having a Liaon to your product team and to me inSMB or you don't have sales engineers. The enablement professional is theperson who does that, and I I often see that missing I'd be curious when youevaluate a company's on boarding or enablement program. What are some ofthe things that, in your opinion, are, are most commonly missed or they'remost commonly getting wrong yeah I mean I saw that in in real time,KPMG definitely a deloid, so the traditional view, unfortunatelyanythichanging, is that if you get all the new talent in a room for three fourdays, that's all you need to do and then you just let them be on their wayand you feel thetey're going to be successful. It's a broken approach.Still, even when I was a consultant for the last couple of years, I saw so manyorganizations, even...

...ones. That would surprise you. You willalways think of Sass enterprises are being very contemporary and Mordar withtheir with heir approach. There's still that philosophy in thinking that if yougather people for three four days and just drop all oftheir content, you havethat Goin to learn it theythay will consume it and then they will besuccessful and then you're surprised how they're not being successful andnot making the number a few weeks or months after that. So that's definitelya traditional mistake that I see organizations do and then the mostcommon one. Let's assume that you have a better approach on doing that initialonboarding. Let's say you have anelames solution that is enabling youto to do that. It's self pace, it's very sophisticated in terms of whatreps are being asked to do: You're, recording them doing a pitcht ordemonstration. You can do all of that and be sure that it's work well andmaybe even the reps will tell you that it worked well, but then we drop theball onmeasuring and we drop the Boll, not just so much on the traditional capeyes. SOTHEJUST in you know, I love time to kind of metrix that I know alot of people wanta track time to seventy five percent quartettainment ortime to second deal one, and they always forget about that continuousmeasurement piece which really is what's missing and I think is brokenfrom making sure that training and wrapping is happening. The way youintended to and that's where the saleswale lost the formula that I'veused, my entire career really comes into play. I love that latter point and I've lived.The first point, which is, I can remember, graduating school o three andgetting my first job and I'll. Never forget what my manager told me my firstday of training. He said we're Gong T we're going to throw you off a bridgeand hope you can fly Ta just thought: Oh Shit! That sounds terrible. So I'mglad to see that that that is changing with the help of of really good sales.enablement professionals like you and Um, you knowleon we're nearing the endof our time during this episode, and we like to kind of round these out withsomething that we call our quick fire five and it's five questions that welike to ask and get just top of mind real answer from executive revenueleaders like yourself, you're ready for sure. Let's do it awesome man cool soyou've been in the revenue collector for a little while, what's been yourfavorite experience so far to date, I've been here for five six months nowI think djusting with absolutely no no hesitation. The best experience to datehas been seeing how the community reacted when hundreds of people were being laid offdue to Covot, seeing the willingness of people to help bow posting job openings,helping out by referring people and not really expecting anything in return.Not Having an agenda was just a beautiful thing to see it. Mad Me justbe an naw of of Howalive, the community, a d how it came together. So thatdefinitely is my highlight so far: love that what's a businessbook that youcontinue to revisit on a regular basis, continue to revisit well, UM, again, nohesitation here either Peter Teles zero to one book. I've read it now threetimes and he just kindo completely shattered my reality. I I took a lot ofeconomics course back in the day and you always learn how you know monopolyis bad and you know governments go after it and you shouldn've pursue itand Peter Tel just completely shattered that idea. He was talking about howcompetition is for losers. He made monopoly sound good. He actually mademonopoly b the place where you want to be as an interpreneur. So it's it's aprovocative stateman and he has many many more in there. So it's not asaleds book, but I I love. I love that book. I love the approach and I lovehow provocative it is. I also love it read it in one day andthoroughly enjoyed it and we'll...

...probably revisit revisited to him. Whatis a commonly held thought in start up land that, to you is completely false? I think- and maybe this is not apopular response here. I've always heard this if you're not breakingthings, you're, not moving fast enough. You know what jut think call me crazy.I'd like to move fast and I break things you now yeah. You may end upgetting there first, but at what cost? There's a reason why first marketcompanies don't always win right so w we remember my space seewhat, theypooked it to them. We'll remember Yahoo and H. ASK JEEVES! I don't know if youremember that that's probably kind o old and I do 'm kindat. I do givingaway my age here, the AO crush them. So I think that breaking things mentalityis introducing unnecessary risks into people's habits and overallorganizational culture, irrespective of size. So that's definitely one that Icall te son go wh. Who is the best business follow right now? On socialmedia I mean I'm, I'm gonna, I'm going to give a shat out to my tomy friend colleague and person. I always want to bounce things off of isPulselamanki. I'm luck enough to be working with him. I don't know if youknow Paul he's a revenue, collective member. He writes daily or Lingtonabout sales, best practices, how to be that top one percenter and his approachto convey those messages is so unique and provocative, and so genuine that Iadjust to. I ha just loved reading am every morning and I also happen to workwith him O. I feel it's I'm a winner in every possible way. I love me. SomePaus Aamana follow Hem Onwingdin think he think he does an awesome job. That'sa great answer, so last question give the audience your life motto or aduiding principle that they can take home with them. Today, life mother, there's really only one. Ilearntd it a hard way when I was really young and that's assume nothing. When Iwas younger in my career, I was just going into projects diving deep intothe task. I I was as still I'm a taskmaster, so I wan to do the best jobI can as quickly as possible, and I always forgot the most important peacewas to ask good questions and assume nothing and if you are going to putspend to paper and produce a report as quickly as possible, make sure you listthose assumptions you made. I still learn to this day, not to assumeanything about whatever project I'm working on whatever relationship Aboubuilding. I always keep asking questions always seek to validate anyassumpters, I'm making it can really save you. It's I save me numerous ideson this has been great man really enjoyed this. This episode, I thinkit's it's great to shine a light on a really important role in sales.enablement tell everyone how they can get in contact with you. If they wantto reach out to you, licting would be the best way lean Hasit. You can alwaysfind me there and if you want to email me as a guty score guard, Elfacid,ACSCORCAR DADAA would love to hear from you and what is your revenue?Collective slack handle Lin ASNYC. I remember Barhar, I I thinkthat's the right convention. Isn't it just, I believe so yeah beautiful wleonlisten. It is great to get to know you today awesome that you work with PaulLove, Paul greate episode. Thank you so much for being on the show Leon and I'msure you and I will be catching up again soon. UEMY playrs are justing.Thank you for having.

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