The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

Ep 10: Improving Customer & Employee Experience with Video w/ Ethan Beute

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Improving Customer & Employee Experience with Video w/ Ethan Beute

Book. What's up everybody, and welcome to the revenue collective podcast. I'm your launch host, Justin Welsh, member of the Los Angeles Chapter of revenue collective, and inside of these episodes we're going to feature ideas and conversations that are inspired by ongoing discussions within the revenue collective community across the globe, and one common topic that comes up frequently in discussions inside of OURC is how we improve experiences. Now that could mean customer experience or employee experience or sales experience, and today's guests is going to talk about how his company does that uniquely with video. Our guest is chief evangelist at bombomb Ethan Butte. Before we dive in with Ethan, a few quick notes. If you're out there listening and want to join revenue collective, visit revenue collectivecom and Click upply now. I also want to thank our amazing podcast sponsor, Gong, the number one revenue intelligence platform for remote sales teams. We are thrilled to announce a strategic partnership in which will be bringing you the best events, content, research and spaceage to engage with your peers and to kick it off, they are sponsoring the revenue collective podcast. We will be bringing you new stuff every month. Do not miss out. Stay up to date on the latest collaborations at Gong Dot io RC. Okay, let's get the show started with Ethan but our guest today is Ethan Butte. Ethan is the chief of angelist at Bombomb, the coauthor of Rehumanize Your Business and the host of the customer experience podcast. Ethan has collected and shared video success stories in a variety of formats for over a decade. He's even sent tenzero videos himself. Even really glad to having the show. Welcome. Thank you so much. I'm happy to be here. I love the podcast and it's fun to be a part of it. Yeah, it's great to have you on and I know I've been on the receiving end of some of those ten thousand videos, so it's nice to nice to finally be be interviewing on the podcast. And you know, before we kind of dive into today's topic, now give us the Ethan Butte Story. How did you end up where you are today as the chief of angelist over at bombomb? Sure I'll be as concise as possible. I spent a dozen years inside local television, running marketing inside, say, your local ABC or Fox station or whatever, and I was coming to the end of the run there. I was just board of it. It wasn't particularly interesting. So it's doing a bunch of project work. I was I was writing landing pages, making videos, writing email campaign, those kinds of things to see, you know, what did I enjoy doing? What skills were transferable and that kind of thing. And wound up connecting with the the two cofounders of bombomb started doing some work for them and I just knew, based on what they were doing, this is like two thousand and ten, two thousand and nine, two thousand and ten, and it just seemed really interesting. It seemed promising. I liked who they were, I liked what they were about, and so I knew when they could make a somewhat competitive offer, that I would jump and join in full time. I probably left thirty percent a total compound the table because when I joined we had fewer than ten team members. bootstrapped company and things like health insurance for not particularly well developed. But you stick with it because you're passionate about the work and it keeps changing and evolving and as a one person marketing team for about three years there and then we started to build the team out. We got an awesome CMO and in a certain point, it was around the time that the podcast launched in the book was released, that it made sense to transition my role from being in marketing in an operational context, primarily around content and email and those types of things, social to chief evangelism, which we may or may not get into in this conversation, but that's the quick route. Very cool. So you know, I've done that before where I've accepted a role of taken a pay reduction because I truly believe and you know, the team, the mission, the...

...product. What was it about bombomb that stuck out to you that made you say, Hey, I got to get in on this thing? Was it was at the team, the product, a Combo both. Would love to learn more. It was really both. I mean the two cofounders are just really, really good guys and their motivation for starting the business I was just aligned with. You know, we make it easy to rehumanize your business communication, hence the title of the book, by making it more personal, more human, you know, and putting faces with names and building human connection and familiarity, being more persuasive and all those other benefits that video provides. But we're doing that in order to rehumanize dehumanized populations of people. You know, circumstance and situations and systems dehumanize a lot of our fellow humans and that's something that we're working on in the background. And it was just interesting and attractive to me. And of course I had a background in video in general, but I was coming from you know, lights, scripts, editing, production, green screens and all of that, like formal professional video, and so this, this inversion that happened where having a shiny video that's highly produced used to buy you trust in credibility back in the day, and you know the period that seth golden would describe as the television industrial complex. But I was a seeing and experiencing, basically through the rise of Webtupoto at that time, and the rise of social and a proper way, this inversion where a much simpler, more honest style of video communication was generating a much better response. Got It and you know, it's really interesting when I think about, you know, improving something like employee experience or I think about improving something like customer experience. Video is not, to me, always the first thing that comes to mind. Should it be? I don't know that it should be the first thing that comes to mind, and certainly we can talk about different ways to apply it in a way that makes sense from a return on investment of time and energy perspective of you know, typically when I when I'm hosting conversations about customer experience, friction, friction, list, those are those are the key words. Look for points where people are being slowed down or or confused or frustrated where obviously there's deceleration perhaps in the sales cycle, that kind of thing, and remove those points of friction. I would say that video can help accelerate a lot of those and can help remove friction, can help build trust where it's absent or restore trust where it's been broken, or breakdown things that are maybe detailed or complex that maybe confused or frustrate people. Video can help you with that. So I definitely think video as a way to communicate right. Video is just a container for your message, like anything else, like typing your words out or recording this audio and releasing it as a podcast. You know, these are just containers for the way we're communicating their containers for our message and because of the human qualities that video allows you to convey. In addition to the show and tell type stuff of screen recordings, it can certainly help improve the experience that your employees and your customers are having with your business or organization. So if you look at a company's customer experience, so maybe you take a look at their sales cycle, you know everything that that sort of touches the customer. How do you, I guess, first identify where video can be used? Is there sort of a certain process that you walk customers through? Like how might you figure out where the best place to implement video in such a that maybe a sales process would be? Yeah, I I'll offer three things, and I already touched on a couple of them indirectly. There are three things that I encourage people to look for again, as they're assessing all of the touch points that customers are having, look for the opportunity to build personal connection. This is the idea that I feel like I know you before I meet you. Therefore, I'm more likely to say yes, whether it's yes, I'll return this phone call, yes, I'll schedule that appointment and yes, I'll actually show up for it. These these types of yeses that we need, the micro conversions and route to the macro conversion, and so building personal connection, having people feel like they matter...

...to you, not treating people like numbers, which is the one of the biggest defenses in any customer experience in general is to have people feel like they're being treated like a number as opposed to as a human being. And so personal connection is one another. One is emotion or tone. Anywhere that you have positive emotion or negative emotion, you're going to do so much better communicating it through video than you are through written communication or even through a voicemail. And by positive of course, it's easy. Thank you, good job, congratulations, those types of things. And Bad news is, you know, anytime you need to make an apology, right because we're all imperfect. Our software is imperfect, arc tools or systems are imperfect. Are People are imperfect, and so sometimes we need to break bad news on people or we need to apologize, and those are typically better done through video and they give people the space to process the information, in addition to feel your sincerity. And my only caution here is if you're not actually sincere about the emotion that you're communicating. Video is going to going to give you away, and so I would avoid video and cases where you're not sincere about the message that you're communicating. And then, finally, the third element that I would look for across those touch points has again, detail or complexity. Where can you get the answer right the first time? Where can you make it so that the person doesn't have to email you back with a follow up question or give you a call back and you don't have to jump on another call to to get to it? What produces anxiety and customers historically? What could be made more clear? And there I'm thinking, like you know, one of the easiest ways that we're talking about video and Linkedin and webinars and things that you see is pairing a video when you make the when you make the pitch, when you're offering the contract or the proposal or whatever the case may be, being able to speak to points that are typically negotiated or frustrating or confusing. You know what is boiler plate that has to stay in that is not negotiable. You know, addressing these things in advance and kind of a show and tell type of way with a screen recording can really move things along more quickly, maintain trust and transparency and and help people feel comfortable moving forward. Okay, so you know you work with a company and you go through their sales process, or your team goes through their sales process, and you identify, you know, three or four spots where there's friction or where you could use better emotion or authenticity. So what's next? Do you do? You sort of flip the camera on and go or kind of record? or or is it more hey, there's a really rigid process to making sure that teams are using video appropriately. Like. What does that process look like? There's so many different ways to go about it and it's so depends on the culture of the organization. You know some organizations. Let's focus on their kind of three main areas that would implement something like bombomb the sales team, obviously, and rolls across the sales team, the customer success team, including support, customer care, account management, CSCSM's, etc. And then leadership and management. And that's primarily an internal focus but can be used in a variety of ways. So let's just focus on a sales team, because it's easy and we can all conjure it in our minds pretty quickly. There's some organizations where the culture is mandated adoption. Here's the deal, this is what we do now. You got a one week ramp time and we're all going to be doing this in this way by this time next week. And then there are other ones that are, you know, a little bit maybe too far. The other way, which is, if you feel like it, this is something that you could do if it made sense to you. I think the best approach is somewhere in the middle where there is a ramp. You maybe start with a handful of you know typically in most sales teams and share with me your experience on this, Justin you know, typically there are a few natural leaders within a sales team from a from a performance standpoint, in those tend to be people who are cheerious us, they're aggressive about learning and growing. They're not satisfied being in the middle of the pack, especially on the board. They want to be at the top of the board all of the time, and so they tend to be pretty aggressive about finding their own new solutions, finding...

...better ways to do things, getting to better outcomes, and people look to them naturally as leaders and so you could do some phased approach where you take some volunteers or you take leaders, implement some of the ideas that we're talking about, come up with some success stories, find out what is actually working and then use that to get the buy in an adoption of the rest of the team. Last thing I'll share here is that the best way for anyone to start with video, whether you're in a very small team, whether you're a Solo Preneur, whether you're part of a much larger organization within a gigantic corporation, the easiest and best way to get comfortable on camera, because you are not going to like yourself, you're not going to like the way you look, you're not going to like the way you sound, you're going to feel uncomfortable. You're not sure, sure if you're doing it right, you're not sure if your equipment's good enough, you're not sure if your light is good enough, you're not you know it. Fortunately, this this pandemic, has made it more comfortable for family members, pets and other things to happen around you in video. But in video recording you have the chance to watch yourself back, which keeps people in their heads a little bit longer. So the best way to start is a habit of sending two videos every single day. I prefer to do it first thing in the morning, but you could really do it anytime time. Block five minutes a day and reach out to two people in your personal or professional network with the message. That's as easy as thank you, good job, job. I've been thinking about you. I was excited to hear, I was sorry to hear, something really simple with someone you know and who knows you, to kind of lower the anxiety level and to get comfortable with your recording process, to get comfortable with your setting, to get comfortable senior celf on camera and doing it in a way that's kind of a safe space in the the positive upside here is that you're going to get if you send ten of these, let's just say you do it for the next week. You send ten of these videos over the course of a week, I guarantee you're going to get at least three or four replies that let you know that this is in fact a different and better way to communicate with people. Yeah, I have that same experience. It's really interesting. I was working at patient pop as the VP of sales and in this was maybe two thousand and sixteen. So, you know, we people weren't getting as many video emails or things like that back in the day. And you know, I got I remember what was my first one, and it had someone with, you know, my name on a sign and I was like Oh, that's really interesting and I remember clicking it and watching it and then I got a bunch of emails from my leadership team that said, Hey, did you get this video? I got one with my name on it and everyone watched it and everyone spread it internally. Now that never happens with a cold email, and so I just replies to say I loved your email. You like, Oh, I love your video. Right, thank you for taking the time to send that video to me right. You'll never get that on an email. So funny. Yeah, it's really interesting. I remember thinking this is this is a tool that we got to use. So we use video and all of our prospecting cadences because we felt as though it humanized our sale development reps and so we loved that. We love that about about video. You also mentioned an interesting part of using video which I hadn't thought of even to this day, which is internally, which is using it too. I'm assuming maybe recognize employees or say a good job. How is using video internally different than externally is are there different rules? Is there are a different process? Is it more at Hawk? Would love to understand your experience using video internally to recognize someone. I would say I'll share a few thoughts here, and that's a good observation. So the first thing is, of course, that the employee experience can be mapped across a boat tie funnel, just like the customer experience can from you know, initial engagement and you know whether in bound or outbound or whatever on the far left side, to that positive growth loop on the far right side, with commitment being in the middle and the positive growth loop being on that right side. For a customer it's expansion, retention, et Cetera, positive online reviews, testimonials, G two reviews and all of that. For the employee it's the same thing. It's an inbound or outpound opportunity or either recruiting or you're you know, you're getting applicants for jobs that you're posting. You need them to understand the role and what it's about. You need to become the employer of choice you...

...need to get that commitment and to get the buying of other people who are in that decisionmaking process, whether it's a spouse or significant other or a mentor somebody else that influences the person that you're trying to bring on board. You need to on board them. You need to make sure you get to a point of impact worth. They're getting what they wanted out of the experience, you're getting what you wanted out of the higher and then that positive growth loop where they're learning, they're growing, their advocating for the company, they're attracting other awesome people to the company, all that, and so I think tracking and analytics are a little bit less important in when you're doing internal communication than they are with external although they can still be of significant benefit to you. I think. I think in both cases you don't need to act as if you don't need to put on errors, you don't need to act as if you're something that you're not. You can be just as honest and simple and straightforward in both cases. And the key thing that matches across customer experience and employee experiences that we all just want to know that we matter. Our interest matters are success matters that people see us and hear us and appreciate us, that people have things of value to offer us and these kinds of things. And so, just as you think about what it's like as a customer yourself or in working with customers, the employees are simply customers of your organization, their customers in a different way, but they are also they're electively, they're they're in an exchange of value and they're there to learn and grow, to have their problems solved, to be challenged and to ultimately get greater success out of their lives and their work by participating with you. And so the remarkably similar. So that's really interesting. You touched on some of the outcomes that you know, being really great on video lends to both your customer base as well as your employee base. But let's talk tactics. So you've sent tenzero personalized videos and again, I myself have received a few of those. So so thank you. What or maybe the top two or three rules for sending an incredible personalized video to either a customer or employee? What are those? Sure? I think the first one is the same thing most listeners are probably thinking about as they're thinking about their email cadences and sequences, and that's you know, how do I get someone's attention? How do I find that sweet spot where I've done enough homework that I can be personal but I'm not overinvesting time there? And it's the same thing here, where it does need to be personal. There does need to be you know, you mentioned the sign and what you're talking about. I use a little white board. It's like a dry a race board that's maybe eight by eleven, and I'll draw pictures or draw a logo or write someone's name or, in the case that it's for multiple people, whether it's a mass send all at one time or whether it's triggered by someone reaching a particular stage of the relationship, I might address the question or the opportunity or whatever. The targeting or segmenting characteristics are. All right, those on the White Board and those will help you get the video played. But specific to your question, here there does need to be specific value for the person. It is ideal to say the person's name to let them know that you do truly see them. You know that they guessed it on a podcast or you know that what they just posted on Linkedin or you know that you went to the same school or any of those other things that people are doing is they're looking to personalized messages. Don't bury the Call to action at the end of the video. Even when I get videos played very typically they might stop at eighty seven percent. You know, you start winding down as a speaker and they start feeling like you're winding down. And you know, even if you keep a video concise under one minute, which I would do in almost every circumstance is keep it under one minute, for variety of reasons, they're going to feel like you're winding down. So keep that call to action up front in addition to repeating it at the end, and don't write a script when you get void, let's see, or you let's say you're dialing and you get voicemail. I know that now we can automatically leave prerecorded voice mails, but let's just pretend that we're calling someone in...

...a more ad hoc basis. When you get that beat of a voice mail, you don't panic and go look around for a script. You know who you called, you know why you called them, you know what the opportunity is and you know what they need to do next. If they want to take to take you up on that opportunity. And it's the same thing in same thing in these videos. So how you say something is just as important as what exactly you say. Don't get hung up on saying the air, I'm air quoting here, the exact right words in the exact right order, because they don't exist. How you say it and the sincere sincerity you have there, the emotion you have there, is something that the other person can feel. So you're essentially selling with emotion, you're selling the opportunity. You're selling by letting someone know that they've been seen there for you value them. You're giving them the gift of your time and attention, which is something that cannot be faked and shouldn't be faked. I am not a fan of fake handwritten notes, for example. I feel like it violates the spirit of the entire Jeff there. You know. So those just a few thoughts. Cool, authentic, you know, Short, emotion filled and you know a CTA that's not buried. So those are some of the things I heard, and that's great because I use video and in my business today. So those are those are four great takeaways. Can I share one more thing, they're really quickly. Absolutely, your video should be supported with at least one line of text. Don't let that little animated preview or thumbnail that has someone's name written on a whiteboard speak for itself exclusively. If you have a specific reason that you reached out to the person or some nugget curiosity, something fun, one of those personalized elements. Write one line of text to compel someone to click play. The subject line, that one line of text in the video preview or the video thumbnail will all work together to make sure that someone clicks play on your video. Love that. Those are great tactical pieces of advice and I know a lot of people are using video and as Ethan's a guy who sent over tenzero them. So those are some really great tactics. Great even we are headed towards the end of our time here and at the end of each show we do something called quickfire five and it is just five questions where we get top of mind real answers from executive revenue leaders like yourself. Ready to go. I am awesome. Let's do it. What is a commonly held piece of wisdom in startup land that you think is total bullshit? I'm going to go with marketers ruin everything. I'm going to say that scales. It's on the verge of ruining everything. I think there's too much activity worship and not enough focus on the best way to get the outcomes we actually want. And so as we equip salespeople with a lot more automation in some of these other tools, combined with a worship of activity, well, frankly, linkedin just isn't as fun a place as it used to be. Yeah, no, I get that. What is a book that has changed Your Life? I guess to keep it somewhat in the context to business, I'll say let my people go surfing, by Avan Chwinard, the founder of Patagonia. It just really speaks to the idea of building a company on personal passion and I know it's starts to sound a little bit soft, but it's just a really cool story and it's got some nice philosophy in it. So you've been in revenue collector for a while. WHO's somebody in the collective that you're a fan of? I'll say Dallas Hoganson. I wound up at his table at the off site in New York City last fall. Fall two thousand and nineteen and as really enjoyed spending time with him. He stayed in touch. Of course. He runs Denver and now he's running Phoenix as well. So He's obviously committed to the collective and helping grow it and he just welcomed me in and I've spent some time with him in person a couple of times and it's been a pleasure. That's awesome. He and I've connected a few times on Linkedin, but I haven't had the pleasure of get a chance to meet him in person yet. So he will be someone that I target to meet. Cool. So you're you know you're you're getting amped up to to create some video. You Know Tomorrow Ethan First Day of the week. What's an album...

...that you're listening to to get excited? What something that you love so fun? I tend not to use music to get hyped up. When I went to go about my work, I tended to kind of chill out a little bit, and so I mostly get quiet and usually involve some some form of physical activity. Running in the morning is very helpful for kind of zoning in to get ready for an important day or some you know, not yoga in a really traditional sense, but you know, some some forms of yoga are also a great way to chill. Awesome. Lastly, give the audience sort of your life's motto or maybe a guiding principle that they could take home with them. Today our son was born. He's now a teenager, but as he was born I was looking for just some guide posts that I could offer him, that he could learn from at a very, very early age, and so I came up with honest, smart and caring. Those are the three most important things you can be. And so, you know, when he was two or three he could say them and when he was eight or ten we would talk about situations and use those as instructive, you know guide post to talk about what happened and how could have gone differently. And so as he gets older and as we think about our own employees, as we think about our team members, as we think about our customers, all it is is about being a good person and operating in a in a, you know, fourth right way, in a way that helps and serves others. And I think if we can be honest, if we can be smart and if we can be caring, we're in a position to win and to win the right way. Love it. You than this has been great. I've really, really enjoyed this. You tell everyone who's listening how they can get in contact with you or learn more about Bombom? Sure I'll give you a few options. First, I do welcome direct communication. That's one of the best things about revenue collective is connecting with other people very directly. is so you can email me, Ethan Etchn at Bombombcom. You can hit me up on Linkedin. It's just Ethan Beaut I'm pretty sure I'm the only one there and my last name is spelled beute. You can check out bombomb at bombombcom. You can check out the book at Bombombcom Book and you can check out the customer experience podcast at Bombombcom podcast. Awesome. And your revenue collectives handle Ethan, but den I'm in Colorado Springs, about an hour sort of an hour south of Denver, but they have welcomed me in. Awesome, Ethan. Thank you. This has been an awesome episode. Love chatting with you. Thank you so much for being on the show man. Thank you. I really appreciate it.

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