The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 108: Direct Mail is THE Tactic w/ Joe Venuti

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 108: Direct Mail is THE Tactic w/ Joe Venuti

Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Pavilion podcast. I'm your host, Brandon Martin, you're listening to Is this a good time? The show where I put Pavilion members on the hot seat for 15 minutes. We hear their incredible stories. We released shows on Tuesdays and Thursdays. So hit subscribe. So you don't miss hearing from our experts. Our guest today is joe Venuti. He's the VP of Inside Sales at Sandoz. So we talk about direct mail as a strategy. No surprises there. This episode is brought to you by drift. More than 50,000 businesses use drift to grow revenue and increased customer lifetime value faster. Do it helps their customers online sales and marketing on a single platform to deliver a unified customer experience where people are free to have a conversation with the business at any time on their terms, learn more at dot com. Alright, let's do this episode 47. Is this a good time? Alright everyone, I'm here with joe Venuti. He is the VP of Inside sales for Sin does so joe so great to have you on the show. Thanks so much for...

...having me excited to be here. Great man. Well look, we are all meat, no filler, we jump right into um go ahead and tell me about your current role and how you got here. You got a couple of promotions within your time at Sandoz. Oh no, yeah, so um I joined Sin does so very early, I was like employee 28 I was the first Arizona based higher I was basically brought into before we even had the office opened. So my job is to come in, build a sales development team in motion and muscle. It kind of grow it with the business. So In 2.5 years. So almost three years now it went from a team of just me sitting on my couch at home recruiting to now I've got, you know, five teams, a director, a bunch of managers and like 55 people. So it's been, um, rapid growth to say the least. There's been a lot of different iterations of what skills development looks like that. Sando. So, so yeah, I mean, I have been promoted a couple of times. I came in as a director about a year in. I got product a senior director and then as the two really, really group. About a...

...year ago I became a VP Nice. And so how 28 people in the organization? I mean, how many people are part of the sales order at that point? I think there was three sales reps, the two sdrs, the VP of sales and make, I mean, we were, we were small, we were brand new. Yeah. So it's, it's been a wild, I always think about that early period and there's a lot of nonsense and good stuff out there frankly about when to bring in what like Wendy, you know, they obviously you had had experience in the past prior to that running running teams so this was not new to use but they obviously brought me in pretty early with one manager to SDRS is definitely not the right ratio, right? But they wanted to build a repeatable process from the get go. It sounds like so yeah, I mean our ceo he reached out and he's a sales guy at heart, right? He was an account executive for a bunch of years and he really understood from day one the importance of having like that top of funnel motion. So there was...

...always pipeline coming in. So that was a huge priority for him and the executive team was to get this built out and kind of build sales deV alongside sales. So I think like that's what led him to going and searching for a leader So early again, the VP of sales at the time had lot of responsibility around like hiring and growing and building sales process against too much for one person if you want both of these units to work the right way. So yeah, chris uh reached out, we had a couple of conversations and I had no idea what sin does A was, but in the first conversation with him, his passion for what sin does A could be. And the fact I found myself continually saying that's genius. I wish I had that boy would this help my current team. Um kind of led to that conversation ended with me saying, where do I sign in a few weeks later, here and here? I was nice. That's awesome. That's awesome. What would you say? So in those early days what would you say was part of the important steps you took to learn so that you could...

...scale you and two people, did you jump on calls? Were you calling where you doing sequences yourself and so forth? Yeah, I mean we some step one was trying to get internet turned onto the building. I mean we were that earlier my first day I was helping task rabbits build desk and unpacked laptops. So It is as day one as day one can be. First goal was, you know, we we knew we needed to hire, we needed to bring tools in. I think we have had salesforce for like three weeks before I got here. Actually, like it was not very built out, so lot of my time was spent just trying to train the couple of reps that we had on on the few tools that we had and then um you know value properties. And one of the things I said during my interview process was were too young for me to even think about like you know 30 60 90 let me come in, let me at least get like a foundation and just prove we can set meetings like I don't care about quality, don't care about titles. Let's just go have conversations and that's how we'll back into our I. C. P. And...

...then we'll narrow it and narrow and narrow it and eventually like we'll build a B. M. And then we'll get way more targeted and we have. But I think that's a tough thing to say in an interview for a job you really want. Hey don't expect quality, just expect the Wild west for the first six months. But like we needed that baseline to understand what this team should look like and what is the right growth and what is the right messaging Like? You know, we really started from zero. I honestly think that that's the right message at that stage, right? Like, and if people are turned off to that, that's, that's a red flag, get out of there because when you're so early in the sales process building the sales process is, there's no historical to build off of like you got to figure out what it is in the first place. I align with that and I hope I practice that on a daily basis. But uh, yeah, I just, I think like the other, the other variable here is we were creating a category director Bill really wasn't a thing. So not only was it a new company...

...with no process, like we couldn't even go in like steal data or steel case studies or anything from anywhere. Like we had to build this thing from scratch. So not was it just a company that was just a team? It was a whole entire direct mail category. Yeah. Fair, Fair. Love it man. Well look, I always say that hard luck, hard luck, hard work and luck both contribute to getting to you to where you are. Give me an example of either one. Uh, that has kind of impacted your career. Yeah. I mean I've always worked hard. It's just how I am right. I mean I think back to being, you know in high school working at blockbuster video, I cared about what I was doing right and I knew that wasn't like a long term career. I started my career off in a security company like contract security and became like a shift supervisor and I just was in the right place at the right time a few times, right? So I basically became an assistant manager like a couple months later my manager got fired unlucky for him, lucky for me because I got that promotion away...

...before I was ready for it and all of a sudden you know I was 24 25 years old and I've got this massive team I'm leaving and then when I pivoted my career into sales I sold for about a year and all of a sudden sales manager job opens and like I was a top performing rep and I had all this management experience so it wasn't the classic case of well let's just see if I'm one of our best sellers can can manage so definitely a little bit of right place, right time, I think like that's been the lucky bounces even with windows, so just chris somehow just found me on a linked in search, you know, I didn't find Santoso had that not happened, who knows what I'd be doing that. Who knows? You know, this was, this was the best move I ever made, love it, love it. That makes a lot of sense. You know, I don't even, I don't often think about that how many times, you know, somebody leaves are underperforms and then just, that's, that's like pure luck, you can't really predict that and you get promoted into that role. But of course the preparation of being, being ready, right? Being a top performer in the first place is the only way that that happened so well, yeah, that's the hard...

...work side of it, right? Like if I wasn't, if I wasn't working my ass off and doing everything that I had to do to be a top performer, like I would have never been the one that they turned to what it was time to replace this manager or when they needed a sales manager. Right? I mean, I got to do a lot of hard work to put myself in a situation to be considered, but they also needed positions to open and people to leave and just things to move the right way. Love it. Love it, man. Well, you know, along the way, you know, look, you guys are the king of direct mail and, and kind of a pillar of the A. B. M. Strategy, the modern A BM strategy, right? Give us a sales tactic that maybe everyone doesn't know a practice today and maybe maybe related to direct mail. Yeah, I mean, I think that direct mail is obviously picking up a ton of steam. That is probably going to be the number one tactic move going forward. We released a state ascending report and I don't remember the exact percentage, but a high percentage of sales and marketing leaders came back telling us that direct mail will be their number one...

...tactic. I think the best tip or trick inside of there that I can give you is and I fell into this trap when I started its. It does a really good, I had to figure out how to use the tool with my team. You can't just send it and forget it. You do all this work, you do some research, you find out who the prospect is, where they went to school. What's your favorite sports team? What's their hobby? Then you go to amazon or you know, you wherever you're going to go to execute this set and you get the right item, you get this crafty handwritten notes, you execute the send and then you just kind of wait for the meeting in the pipeline to fall from the sky. That is, I think where a lot of people kind of missed a huge opportunity. Follow up on this end. Following up on your send is probably the most crucial part of sending. For instance, like the SDR team at Sandoz. So when they execute a send, there's a notification that sentosa will send you when your package arrives. That tells the SDR that this person now goes in to a very aggressive outreach sequence...

...that has 19 touches over the next 30 days. It's the whole idea of reciprocity. The example that I use all the time is, you know, if you have a feeling that he lives across the country, they send you a birthday gift, you think, wow, that's so nice. It's like I got to call them and thank them By the time you get back up the stairs, sit down at your computer. The therefore emails, 15 slacks you late the next meeting, Calling this person is not going to happen if that person calls you in the next day or two, it's super. Top of mind. You're willing to talk about it. You're ready to go. If you don't talk to them for six months, you kind of forgot about it. So I tell the Sdrs the clock is ticking. When you get that email saying the pockets landed, your clock is ticking and every day that goes by is a little less gratitude. So strike while the iron is hot so that the tip in all of that. everything I just said is have a follow up strategy and make sure the teams executing on it. Yeah, I love that, love that one. It's, it's, I like the...

...idea that the great, what do you say? The gratitude meters falling every day that goes by, There's a half longer with you will. Cool. Cool. Well, all right. So what's a key position you're hiring for? You, hiring for anybody? Um, you know, specific? Yeah. So, um, definitely always looking for for SDRs right now. I'm actually in the midst of interviewing for a commercial team SDR manager as well. So that's a pretty critical higher for us. We just promoted one of our managers up into a director role. So we need to backfill that team, the managers of that segment or managing a lot of people. So it's time to split that team out and bring in another great leader. So interviews are underway there great and give some shout outs who are some folks that you appreciate what they're talking about from a marketing standpoint and a VM standpoint and then of course any up and comers that you feel are going to be rock stars. Yeah, so I think that there's, you know, you've got to kind of, in this world of linkedin and everybody being an expert, like I...

...really try to take a lot of what's out there with a grain of salt, although one guy that I think is spot on, like 100% of the time, Kyle Coleman, you know him and I have very similar roles, he just drops amazing pieces of knowledge around, you know, just day in the life of Sdrs. So he's a really, really good one. Whenever I see his name pop up like a kind of pause and read it and definitely have stolen a couple ideas and brought it back to the team. But yeah, I think he's just a super smart guy and he's right on the ball. Lauren bailey is another one who found her factory girl stuff. I do a lot of work with her in Girls club. I'm one of the mentors, but she's, in other words just she's got a lot of podcasts, a lot of weapons. There's a lot of speaking engagements, just super, super intelligent, super smart. She's one of those people that you kind of listen to talk all day because she's just full of ideas and experience. We got to boston with the smart. I like it. Yeah, right. I do my best, but it's there it comes out and then as far as up and comers I'm probably going to have to uh shout out someone internal. Um I just...

...mentioned, we recently promoted to manager to a director, but there's a woman on my team by the name of Ray in english. She was one of my first hires, started off as an SDR worked her way up to manager, she's now a director, she's absolutely crushed it every step and uh, she's going to big, big, bright future ahead of her head. I think that you know, this recent promotion to a director role, people will see and hear a lot from her in the near future. Read, that's great. Alright man. Well we're down to the most important question of them all. All the other stuff is for everybody, for me. I want to know what restaurant, where am I going to eat? Could be close to you, where you are now, could be wherever. Just give me a spot, it is not close to me, but it is hands down my favorite restaurant, Golden steer in las Vegas. It's a steakhouse, wow, it's a steakhouse, it's off the strip so you need to lift your Uber but it's well worth the 10 minute ride. I'll tell you how I found this place and I know they were low on time but about probably 35 years ago now my father and a friend was went to Vegas, they had made some money playing...

...blackjack, it decided they were gonna go celebrate and have a big steak. We got in a taxi and said uh we want to go for the best steak in Vegas, we don't care what it costs, we don't care where it is. A taxi driver took them there from that day on my father who would go to Vegas I once a year for a guys trip. They went to the golden steer every time now, which is like Arizona on there a lot. I do some work there, so it's kind of become a staple in my family, but everyone, I've brought their loves it. So if you're in Vegas, that's my recommendation, golden stuff, go on, go to the golden state. I love it man, that's awesome. Well joe awesome to hear your story. You get to know you a little more and you know, I know you're battling a little bit of a cold, feel better man, but it's so great to have you on the show awesome man, I appreciate it was great. Jim. All right, that's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please write, review apple podcasts or Spotify app, send it to some friends, make sure you smash that subscribe button reminder of this episode was brought to you by a drift. The new way businesses by from businesses. You can learn more and get...

...the conversation started at drift dot com. I had fun. Hope you did too. Now will crush your numbers. Say something, Yeah.

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