The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Ep 81: Building A World Class Sales Development Shop w/ Julianne Thompson

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Ep 81: Building A World Class Sales Development Shop w/ Julianne Thompson

Part of the "Thank God It's Monday" hosted by Tom Alaimo.

All right, everyone thank God it's monday. Welcome back to the revenue collective podcast where executives in revenue positions try to up level of their craft, learn the strategies, tips and tactics that they need to be successful. I am your host of this podcast, Tom Alamo and I'm excited to get into today's guests before we get into it. Let me give a quick shout out to our sponsor. So this episode is brought to you by quota Path, a commission tracking software built for sales operations, finance and accounting teams. Running commissions and payroll has you running for the Hills, quota path is for you quote, a path helps organizations track and manage commissions and pay their teams accurately and on time every time, keep your team motivated and on target. Simplify your commissions. That quota path dot com slash revenue dash collective and give your reps the gift of transparency. Now for today's episode, super excited to have this conversation with Julianne, Thompson. Julianne is the head of sales development at drift. Prior to that, she was running sales development teams that outreach and formerly a high caliber softball player. So we get into her background how she's translated some of the athletic disciplines that she had into sales and into leadership, how she built her craft while she was at outreach and how that's translated to drift in the way that they run conversational sales. So without further ado, let's just get straight into my conversation with Julianne. All right, Julianne Thompson, welcome to the revenue collective podcast. How are you doing? Well, thank you for having me, excited to be here today. Absolutely. Um, so I always like to learn in the times of Covid where folks are are located. Sounds like you're spending some quality time with family, is that right? Yeah, that's right. So I 11 Tampa florida. I'm from Virginia. So both my parents and my in laws in Virginia. I've got a 19 month old son. And so that's been one silver lining of the pandemic is getting to spend some extra time with the grandparents this past year. That's great. I've got to ask for a boston based company. You're living in Tampa. There's a lot of tom brady connection there. I'm a huge tom brady fan. I got to ask, are you in the same camp where you buck span or what? Yeah. So um since we moved down about five years ago, we've become bucks fans. Another lifelong but span. And so obviously finding out that tom brady was making his way down the Sunshine State was super exciting for us. So yeah, I got a super bowl out of it first year. So we'll see where it comes where it goes from there. Nice, Nice. So we have a lot to get into today. I want to start with a little bit of your background because if anyone checks out your linked in profile, you know, the first few lines are great attention grabbers and uh, you say there's two things that you can do better than most people in the world. One is, you know, running a sales development shop, which...

...will get too. But the first is throwing a nasty drop curve, which is, is some sort of a softball pitch. So I'd love to hear a little bit about the softball background and how that's kind of primed you for the path that you've taken through sales and sales leadership. Yeah, absolutely. So, um, I put off all my life from when I was four years old until I graduated college and um, learned just so many good lessons about work ethic and you know, working towards a goal competing, but also working together with a team. And it turns out a lot of those skills are very good for sales. And so when I graduated I just thought, you know, I'm not done with this team environment, I'm not done with this competitive element that I've worked so hard to develop over the years and um you know, I want to continue that, how can I do that? So I got introduced to sales. I think it's funny to always think about how somebody gets into sales because nobody in high school is like, I want to go sell software and I think that's changing a little bit, but it is interesting how people kind of get into it. And so for me it was just how can I do the things that I love doing, working towards a goal with a team competing and you know, having that delayed gratification. You know, every ball you hit off of a T is going to help you hit your next home run. Every cool call you make every objection that you hit handle is going to help you hit your quota. And then specifically on the pitch that I threw. So I was not a speed picture. If you know anything about softball, I am five ft two, which means I, I do not have the physical advantages that most pictures have. And so I wanted to be a picture more than anything in my life at the time. And so I said, okay, how can I differentiate myself? And so I got really, really good at precision location and breaking ball. So that's where that drop curve comes from. And it was really slow, really slow compared to most of the other pictures I was going against. But I knew it was my strength. And so the reason I talked so specifically about that one pitches, I think there's a lesson there about not every sales person is going to be the same and not every sales person is going to have that stereotypical mindset of stereotypical persona of a sales person. But if you can really drive into what you're good at and if it's something that you want to do bad enough and you can perfect your craft, you're in a position to be successful. And I ended up playing software in college. So it worked out for me there and there's something to be said about being, I know softball's a heavy like team sport but being a pitcher or a catcher where you're really out there kind of on an island, right? Everyone's watching you. You know, whether you're doing well or poorly is pretty obvious to everyone in the stands and everyone on your team. And I think that relates to sales a lot, right? Where you you do have a team and there's that camaraderie there, but you have to do your own job and you have to do your own job really well. And there's some pressure that can be tied to that. So I imagine there's some level of a factor there too that has played into your sales career. Absolutely, yeah. That's um, it's...

...difficult to articulate the amount of pressure that you have unless you've experienced it when it's the bottom of the seventh inning, you've got two outs and a runner on third base and you're on the mount. It's a very high pressure situation and I know there's a lot of other high pressure situations in the world that that might seem very minuscule to some, but I I really fed off of that and I like being the person, it's like okay get on the mound, you're you've got to get this, get this out. And so I like being that person and I think that in sales, like you said it's similar because you get to celebrate the individual ones, but also there's a, I can't even tell you how many times I threw a bad pitch ended up with a shot down left field and my teammate was diving for the ball in the background and saved me. And I think that you know there's so many different departments that help out with the sales process and you know if you're an account executive that is you know, executing well and doing a great discovery but you're not great at setting up the demo, that's where your solutions consultant comes in. And so being able to really leverage the expertise of the others on the team so that everybody ends up in a win win situation. And did, you know, coming out of school, just based on this, you know, competitive streak and wind to kind of continue that and use that to your advantage. Was with sales an obvious choice for you? Was that because there's someone guiding you towards that or how did you end up getting into sales after college? Yes, it was a total accident. So I signed up for an internship when I was in college too. It was sports marketing internship and it had absolutely nothing to do with sports and nothing to do with marketing, but they were targeting athletes, student athletes. And you know, I I got to the internship, they sent 600 students down to chapel hill north Carolina. And then I started to really understand what I was going to be doing for the summer and how I was going to be compensated and how you know what a sale process sales process would look like and they did an amazing job of training all of these interns and then the other internships I did in the school were all in the sports industry. So I worked for the Washington nationals, I worked for D. C. United, I worked for the Richmond flying squirrels, which is the double A affiliate of the san Francisco giants. And so my goal was always after I learned that sales was the right place for me. I actually wanted to work in professional baseball and um sell like if you go to a baseball field and you see the all the advertisements on the back of the, on the back of the fence and you know on the jumbotron and stuff, I wanted to be able to sell those advertisements. So I did all these crazy unpaid internship ships working ridiculous hours and a ton of fun. But then I got a full time position with the Washington nationals and the compensation was nowhere what I was expecting. And I lived in D. C. At the time. All right outside of D. C. And so I said okay I think I need to go back to the drawing board and think about how I can set myself up for a lucrative career. And ended up getting connected with an amazing company called Memory Blue. They hire people early in their career that don't have any cell uh experience selling software and teach them how to do that so that they can go...

...over to other companies and sell um sell their software and you know you had by the looks of it, you know, a lot of success there in the first few years of your career as a SDR as a outside sales person and then landed at outreach. And that's where it looks like you really built a lot of your chops for sales development and and for my opinion that's I couldn't think of a better place probably to learn the playbook of how to run and build a successful sales development team than somewhere like outreach where that's, you know, really what they're doing. So I'd love to learn about what that experience was. Like you came in relatively early into the business through some tremendous growth. And so I'd love to learn like what that was like and how you helped to build out the sales development function there. Yeah, so I'll take a step back because there's an interesting story here. I worked for a really small startup in Tampa called kite desk. Kite desk was really where I, I sold my first software deal. And um I was an account executive there. I ended the year as a top the top performing account executive on the team Closed about a 3rd of the revenue for the company against small company and then the ceo they're tapped me on the shoulder and like, hey, I think that you would be really awesome. It leadership, have you thought about that before? And I really had it and so he said, I'll tell you what to make a deal. You take the team for a quarter if you like. It team is yours. If you hate it, go back being account executive. But I think you have a really interesting opportunity here to get into leadership test the water seat, that's what you want to do in about a month into it. I thought this is, this is what I was meant for. You know, this is, it's so much more exciting to, you know, see that light bulb go off in an SDR and have the opportunity to help them reach their goals than to be able to, um, you know, have that close that big deal myself. And so think about it in terms of softball is like I would rather be cheering on the team and teaching them the different things that they need to know to in order to be successful rather than hitting my own home runs. And so yeah, that's why I made the decision to move over into management. But shortly after that decision, that company shut down and the company was a competitor, a very small competitor of outreach. And so when that company closed down, the ceo of that company got in touch with outrage and said, Hey, I don't know if you have any plans to create an East Coast presence, but I've got a team of sdrs with the manager there ramped, they understand the personas, they understand the competitive landscape, they understand essentially that the market you're selling into, you know, have you considered opening an office down here? And so that's actually why they opened the Tampa office for outreach. Is they essentially required just the sales development team of that company. So going from a really small company where I was just trying to figure out, you know, how to implement call scripts, how to do training and starting to try to figure out this out on my own. I then went to outreach and I worked with a team of managers and so going back to like the team aspect, it was awesome to get to know more about how other management styles worked and you know, some managers have different strengths and you know, we could kind of...

...accommodate for one another which was really great. But I was also, I had to do a lot of thinking on my own because I was the only manager in Tampa and so that experience was a little bit of you know push me in the water see if I can swim, but also having the resources and support across the country in Seattle. So learned a ton there just about what it means to scale. I did a lot of hiring, I did a lot of firing which is not the best part of the job, it's probably the worst part of job, It is an important one and it is a skill that you need to learn how to put somebody through that process and help them beat their performance improvement plan if you get there. And I had never done any of that before. And so, getting to learn from some of the best sales development leaders out there and you know, my, my manager at the time, steve ross, who is an amazing human being, you know, walked me through a lot of my first as a manager. Yeah. And it sounds like, you know, from when you were there in the early days of outreach that they were really pushing the outbound process right? Like there wasn't a lot of inbound, there wasn't a lot of marketing alignment in the early days when you were there. So I'd love to hear about how you helped to scale that with like in a business where, you know, if you're not going outbound and you're not creating the opportunities, there's just nothing is happening, you know, that the sales aren't happening. So I'd love to hear you talk about that type of environment. Yeah, absolutely. So, um, there is a pretty well known story at this point with outrage that they went 0 to $10 million with virtually no marketing. So just like you said, there wasn't a ton of inbound going on. And that's because they wanted to build the company around the belief of the product and you can out help grow a company to a point where, you know, they are right now, which is, you know, very far along in their journey. And so they wanted to really drink the kool Aid manny medina talks about he was the company's first str and so many medina was out making cold calls because they wanted to truly understand the problems that an outbound rap faces and this always surprises people. But at outreach, they haven't been there in a year. So this may have changed, but 70% of the meetings they book are on the phone. A lot of times people think outrage, sending a bunch of emails. You know, there's some automation and there which there is personalization at scale through automation, but they're still hitting the phones very hard. And I think that's something that really resonates with me. Going back to my first SDR job. You know, technology wasn't anywhere close to where it was back then and we were kind of dialing off a spreadsheet. And so it wasn't, you couldn't just be good because you were awesome at research or had a really efficient process. You have to be good on the phones. And so I'm being able to bring that over to outreach to. And that was my favorite part of the job. There is just really getting, getting in and doing call coaching with the Sdrs and helping them understand how to have those types of conversations now outbound certainly can be difficult and has its challenges. And if you're listening, this is probably not a surprise to you. But we also know that outbound typically results in higher SPS shorter sales...

...cycles and uh, lower term rates as well. So there's certainly value in going outbound. And there are companies that like outrage can get a very long way without marketing. But what's really nice is when they did hit that 10 million mark and they had weren't getting integrated and then the to start to come together, which is when they really started setting off Absolutely. And then when you went over to drift, it sounds like it was almost the opposite in a lot of ways because drift is you know, known among other things for having incredible marketing and the product lends itself to a lot of inbound and you know, folks that are coming in and that being an entirely different kind of sales process also being kind of the term of conversational sales and being seemingly kind of more of like a casual type of relationship with the customer versus like the buttoned up like you know old guy and blazer that you think of with a lot of like, you know, older software hardware companies. So I'd love to hear you talk about the like you have to learn a whole new skill set or a whole new type of environment to work in coming to an inbound first type of company. Yeah, absolutely. The selling motion at drift is so unique because we talk a lot about everyone talks a lot about humanizing the sales process. But one thing that I think drift does really, really well is they meet the buyer where they're at. And so you know, if if you or to be contacted by call, we can call you. If you prefer to be contacted by email, I can email you and then if you're on our website Researching us, because we all know that 60 of the fires journey is complete by the time they even talk to a sales person were able to help guide people through that process earlier without this incredibly high pressure. Hey, what's the next step when you're going to do this? What's going on here? It's getting the information to the fire at the time that they need. It is essentially what drift was built around. And so as it relates to the inbound engine. One thing that we talk a lot about it drift is just that the importance of the quality of our brand and you know, we're not just building a software company, we're building a globally recognized and respected brand. And so with all of that emphasis around brand, we have a ton of inbound, so we would produce a ton of content and um, we have drift insider, which is an awesome community for people that want to better understand what conversational marketing and conversational sales is, how to tie those two things together under revenue acceleration and then being able to, you know, connect with your buyers in on their terms. And so that, that incredible community then fuels inbound leads and then we then turn and go outbound. So before I started at drift, they had four outbound str. S. So those four were hired in 2019. So a lot of people that surprises a lot of people because they think, you know, drift has always had all these all these sdrs, that's not actually the case. We've just done an amazing job with inbound and then getting those leads directly to the account executives. So then when um in 2019 they have the four sdrs and then found out that, you know, there was a lot of really great things about going outbound, going back to the higher A. S. P. S. Going back to, you know, the shorter deal cycles and lower...

...turn rates and things like that. And so they said, okay, let's really ramp up Outbound. And so they brought me on in early 2020, we had 12 sdrs by the time I started that we're all hired in the last three months and we have 22 sdrs right now. So incredible amount of growth for our team and we have a breakdown of, you know, inbound and outbound and kind of how that works. But ultimately 90% the opportunities that we generate have marketing touches on them. So what I really like about drift is especially in the last year we've really integrated inbound and outbound so that they fuel each other so your inbound signals will gear you and help you prioritize which accounts you should be doing your outbound toward. And if you're doing outbound appropriately, that's going to spark some interest, lead them back to your website and then they're going to convert to inbound. So it turns into this nice life cycle. Yeah. And um, you're mentioning before the call to that, I think there's what like 44 or five different like scr teams. Do you mind just kind of breaking down what that looks like in the orig, yep. Yeah so we have chat STRS which of course we are adrift. So we do a lot of chat and we want to make sure that everybody who hits our website has an amazing customer experience, our prior experience. So we have a chat str team and I'll talk a little bit in a second about how that team is developed and why. And then we have our inbound team, our inbound team. It works on accounts that are not already tied to an account executive so they're unnamed accounts. And um so it may be initially look like low fit because of I. C. P. Criteria but they're showing high engagement so that those individuals would go to our inbound team. And then we have our outbound team both at mid market and enterprise that are tied to account executives that have a specific list of accounts that they focus on and they're doing the grant of our outbound work. But then if somebody comes inbound on one of those accounts, that's their account, they're familiar with that, they've been working it. So they also get some inbound to. So that's where the, to start to bleed together if you will. And then actually pretty recently we just hired to sdrs in the media and one in a pack. Nice getting going international. Yes. Yes. It's super exciting. I saw somewhere a post of yours around the conversational sales model and how that works from an SDR lens at drift. I'm really interested. It looked like there was kind of a three pronged approach, like a three tier that was if my notes served me and if this hasn't changed, like engage, understand and recommend if that's still the case. Could you unpack that a little and if not then what the updated version is? Yeah, absolutely. Um, so we teach us a lot with our chat sdrs, but it's also very relevant with anybody in the SDR functionality. So the engagement piece, something that we say a lot is surprise and delight. And so it's having a unique experience when you have a prospect, come onto your website, having a personalized experience. And um, you know, sometimes will say, hey, do you wanna hear a joke...

...or something like that and just open conversation, no pressure, very conversational. And other times we'll just say like, hey human here, human there. And that's an interesting opener that people away because you know, they think they're talking to it, but, and you know, in fact they wanna clarify that is actually human on the other side. So usually something catchy on the, in the beginning, that engaged piece isn't just about being funny or being clever. It's about, you know, trying to help meet the buyer whether at and understand what problem they're trying to solve. So one of our favorite questions to ask is, hey, what metrics are you looking to drive right now? And so by understanding the metrics that somebody is researching and why they would want to, um, you know, potentially become a draft customer will help us better move into that second part, which is understand. And so, um, there's an old sailor rule which is seek first to understand and then to be understood. And I think this is a golden rule, not just for anybody that's engaging with prospects on chat, but also anybody who's engaging with prospects in any other of the various channels. And so, um, you want to be able to understand what metrics are you trying to drive? You know what has you doing some research today just browsing around? Are you in an evaluation? What does that look like and really unpacking what it is that they're trying to accomplish and you know what are the positive business outcomes that they could get from making a potential move to drift. And so the last part of that of course is recommend. So once you actually have understood where they are what the, what their journey looks like you have to make recommendations. Sometimes that recommendation is hey it looks like you're doing some research on this specific thing. I have a piece of content that I think that you would enjoy. That's the recommendation. Check out this piece of contact. Sometimes if they're further along in the virus journey, that recommendation is to grab some time to talk with an account executive and that would be more of like your typical SDR motion. And then I think the third option in the recommend bucket is um when that can be really difficult but sometimes you have to recommend another solution. And so um we have prospects that will come onto our website and you know, not they're trying to just understand what is it that drift does. And so they have that conversation with the chat SDR and then they may or may not decide that that's a going to be a good fit are going to be able to solve their problem. And so the recommendations sometimes is hey go check out these other companies. I think that's a better fit for what you're looking for. It sounds like it's kind of the inverse of the way that a lot of people are trained as SDRS when they're initially cold calling people, which is like do what you gotta do, like get the meeting, get the meeting. And so you're you're making the call with the explicit goal of no matter what. Like I have to get this person on a meeting with an A. E. Because that's how I'm comped and that's how, you know my what my goals are and I'm sure you do have quantifiable goals like that. You have to. But for your team, it...

...sounds like it's the focus is on the conversation. Have a conversation, human to human. You know, be curious, ask those questions, try to understand and then based on what they say, if it makes sense, a logical step could be for them to learn more about drift or it could be not depending on what they say. Is that fair to make that conclusion? Yeah. You know, one thing that I want to point out here though, is our SDRs while we want to meet the buyer where they're at what we want to give them the information that they need to know. We still do a lot of training around objection handling. So there there is that piece of it. So, um, you know, if you're making a cold call and somebody says, I'm not interested, somebody could say, okay, no big deal, I'll call you back in six months, but we all know that time is going to kill deals. And if, if you've done the research on the company, you understand what problem they have. You understand and can articulate how we can solve it. There's still a place to handle objections as well. And so, you know, we do a ton of training around handling objections on, on timing and on budget and on authority and those types of things. So that's the only caveat I would add into that reversed typical sales cycle are SDR cycle. Yeah, totally. And I think part of that is really understanding the buyer like doing your research. Like you said, like knowing the trends, knowing where the buyers like where they are in their journey, knowing like the problem that you solve in the market. And I failed better that you understand that the more confidently you can handle those objections in a meaningful way versus just saying, I don't know like, well no one has like, you know, kind of fighting the budget argument by saying, well, you don't need budget to have a 30 minute call or something. I don't know, stupid that I just made up like that, but, but the more informed you are, the better you can handle those objections. Absolutely. Absolutely. I'm curious if there's any I'm always cares about like resources development. Like are there books that you recommend to, you know, other like sales leaders and they could be sales books or leadership books or something completely different but books or podcasts or things on Youtube or any any resources that have helped you in your career that you tend to recommend to others. Yeah. So I've got kind of what I think is a unique one because it's not necessarily considered a sales book, but I think that it helps just with your interactions with others and it's a classic how to win friends and influence people. And so I'm not sure if you've read it before. It was the first book that I read after. I knew I was getting into sales. I took it, I read it into a professional selling course and I read it about once a year now. And so um I'll always go back and my my poor book has been annotated 100 times and um I recommend it to SdrS a lot as well. And one of the reasons that that book is so important to me is um it keeps you focused on others and creating great experiences for others. And so it's how to win friends and influence people. Seems like a very me...

...centric topic, but it's really about how you treat others. And there are so many good lessons in there just around like active listening, which I know is a sale skill that people talk about a lot, but are they actually doing it? And I need a reminder a lot of times as well and um you know, making connections to what people care about and you know, one thing that I've been guilty of, my friends will tell you is what they call it, the one upper and what I mean by that and I've learned a lot about the psychology of this is if you say, hey, I had pizza for dinner last night, like hey, I had pizza a week ago and mentally what I'm trying to do is like relate to you and be like, oh, I've done that before too. But instead you should ask, great, what kind of toppings did you get and have the person talking about themselves? And so that book is just, it's a good one for me to keep myself accountable each year and just, you know, take a step back. As far as actual sales tactics. I am much. I love to consume content in small pieces. And so rather than read one single book on an entire philosophy, which I do, I actually prefer to consume my content, you know, from sales leaders on linkedin. And so whether that's the form of a post or a blog or a video pull that are crazy popular right now, but just understanding what other sales leaders are doing and then being able to like take a piece of each person's puzzle and then create your own puzzle be so like Sam nelson is a great one. I worked with SAM for a long time at outrage. She's awesome back Holland. I follow her religiously. I referenced her like once a day at least. So those are two of my favorites kevin Dorsey of course there's a lot of sales leaders out there where I just like to pick and choose what I, you know, grab from their philosophies and methodologies. Yeah, I mean linkedin is just littered with amazing, amazing sales and leadership content. All three of those people are outstanding. I'm curious Robinson, the revenue collected podcast. I'm curious how you have leverage one revenue collective. There's a lot of ways to get involved if it's slack channel or meeting people are doing forums or using playbooks. So I'd love to learn how you use the community, but also just in general, like if you have any philosophies around networking that have served you well in your career. Yeah, it's really interesting. I'll give you an example from somebody else that I just talked to you last week that I found really interesting. So there's a guy, he's a VP of sales right now. Going back to that story I told about the company that shut down and then we moved out, which he worked with me at that company that shut down. Then he worked with me and outrage and now he's the VP of sales and so, um, he is getting into some real estate investments and so he said that he has created such a great network around revenue collective and just understanding people who are like minded and want wanting to think about long term wealth. And I just thought that was such an interesting connection...

...from more of like a revenue generating type of organization to something that, you know, is personally interesting to him now. He's not going in and picking up the phone and cold calling people and trying to get them to do crazy things like that, but just networking with like minded people. So I wanted to start with that story because I found that very interesting as far as myself personally, one thing that I found really interesting and doing prospecting when SDR is like, hey, do you know this person? And then, um, I'll say, okay, let me check out their linkedin and I actually see that they're a member of revenue Collective or they've produced content on revenue collective and even just having that entry point and it's not, hey, your revenue collective were in revenue collective, lets book a meeting. It's let me go consume their content. Were they on a podcast? Let me understand where their mindset is. Let me understand before again, going back to seek first to understand and then to be understood, Let me understand the things that are important to them. So being able to consume content as, as a means for creating connections and building rapport with your prospects as an SDR is a great thing to do. It just needs to be personalized and it needs to be relevant. So you can't say I heard your podcast, it was awesome. Do you want to book a meeting? Right? So you've got to be able to connect those two things together? Could you take that one step further? Like in that example, if I'm your SDR that said, hey, let's see your connected to, you know, SAm Jacobs. There you go. And you listen to some of this podcast and stuff like that. I'm just curious like, how do you reference that as an executive to him coming across in a way that you did do your homework? But ultimately at some point in the conversation, you do want to see if it is the right time to have a real like business conversation. I'm curious if you could take that one step further. Okay, So I'll give you an example and I'm probably going to put myself in the hot seat here. So if you heard this conversation today and you know that I have both inbound and outbound str let's imagine you're a recruiter and you know that we're growing like crazy right now, somebody could reach out to me and say, Hey, um I love your podcast on, you know, with revenue collective and I love learning more about your journey from outreach over to drift and how you fused inbound and outbound together. It's awesome to hear that the team that drift is growing so tremendously right now. I may be able to help you out. Can we have a 30 minute conversation to explain how that would work? That's how I tie those two things together. Your inbox is going to be flooded. I know I know I am hiring though. I am hiring actually. This is so random. I didn't even notice this till right now, but my pen, I got my drift right now. Very good. That's great flag. Some of the best swag uh and when you're talking about building a brand, that's a unique way to do it versus just like The $7 t shirt that like, you know, nobody wears. I mean you guys, you guys put it together in a...

...legit way. Yeah, absolutely. That's, it's funny. Every time I run a contest with my team or an incentive or competition or something like that, I'll ask them like what kind of prizes do we want, gift cards do we want? You know, a virtual pizza party? What are we looking at here? There was like just in a swag, like we love the swag so much actually have a drift sweatshirt that is like probably the comfy ist article of clothing that I own and there was like a week straight that I didn't take it off, so if anyone can get your hands on trips, swag in some way, if you're a customer asked the rep for some swag because it's top notch. Yeah, absolutely. It's my drift sweatshirt. I've got a quick sad story about that. So I was up in Virginia and my dog chewed up my sweatshirt and I was super flat about it because it is a great sweatshirt, but we cut ear holes in the hoodie part and he wears it now and it is excellent. Does the dog really need a sweatshirt in Virginia or florida though? Isn't it always warm enough for it? You know, he doesn't, he doesn't need it, but when you see it, you understand why he needs it. It's more of a style thing. Oh, it's totally a style. Yeah, he's a Doberman. So he's like at this big sweatshirts. Fantastic. I'll send pictures sometimes. That's hilarious. That's hilarious, Julian. This is a blast. Any topics that we didn't get to or thoughts that you wanted to share as we're closing out here and then afterwards, obviously let's here where the best places for people to connect with you, if they either want to pitch you like you just teed up or if they just want to connect and learn more from you. Yeah, there's, there's one thing that I mentioned I would get to and I didn't have a chance to, but it's around the career path thing peace. And so as always breakdown of the team, I just wanted to circle back on if anybody had questions around that. So we did something interesting last year and developed a career development plan with different micro promotions for Sdrs. And um, one thing that we found is it was difficult to on board new hires that were, you know, early in their career that haven't worked remotely, maybe haven't worked at all. And so what we did is we developed a edit to this chat position that already existed. So it used to be that you are in the chat position for a year and then you can decide if you want to go into sTR or something else. Now, what we do is we actually bring people into that position for about four months, give them the foundations of everything that they need to know without the pressure of a heavy quota, given the opportunity to learn the product in the platform, learn the personas, learned the challenges that we saw for, and then we moved them into inbound or into outbound depending on their skill set and depending on the business needs. So I just wanted to circle back on that since we didn't get a chance to impact that earlier, otherwise I think we've covered it and I appreciate you having me on today, Thank you for adding that peace in because I think that's probably one of the tougher challenges I imagine, of scaling a team so quickly with in particular sales development, where folks are so early in their career generally, or at least early in their sales career hungry for the next...

...step and trying to line out a plan where they feel like They know how to get to the next level, whether that's a senior SDR, a different type of SDR or 80 or whatever it might be. So I appreciate that, that anecdote. Absolutely. And then the best place for folks to connect with you, if it's linked in or email or take talk or I don't know wherever. Yeah, linkedin is definitely the best place. Um, I, I love to post content as well as learn from others on there, so if you haven't connected with me already, please do that Julian Thompson and uh look forward to connecting anybody who's listening. And speaking of linkedin, you had a hell of a run on the lead. I q uh I don't know if that thing's still going, I see those posts all the time, but you are upsetting. I don't even remember the names that you took down some huge names though along the way to get to the at least the final four. Yeah, that was that was a five little contest, I'm glad they did, but I guess I'm going back to the competitive aspect of it. I was like soliciting votes from even completely shameless about that. My biggest personal victory was after my friend or um when I was against my friend max Alschuler from outreach and he's a great guy. So we had a lot of fun with it and like he's one of the biggest names in SAS. I was like, what am I doing? How did I get myself here? Yeah, it was a lot of fun. Sarah brazier, the one and only knocked me out this week. It's going back to the, some of the people that I follow and listen to. She's an amazing person. If you don't, if you don't follow her, please go do that. She actually knocked me out this week, but it was a fun little contest we didn't know. No shame in the final four I think like, you know, I remember it was like jake Dunlap that max and there's someone else and then he came up against the indestructible force that is Sarah so no shame in that. Yeah, it was a lot of fun. Thanks Julianne. But this is great, appreciate you. Coming on. Everyone definitely go check out drift, go check out Julianne on on linkedin. If you want to learn more from her post or connect with her. Uh Thanks for checking out that episode. You can find more about revenue, collective revenue collected dot com. It hit me up on linkedin. I am Tom Alamo. I work over at Dong as an E and one last shout out to our sponsor. This episode was brought to you by quota path, quota path is the first radically transparent and to end compensation solution from sales reps to finance. Get started for free at dot com slash revenue dash collective. We'll see you next monday. Say something. Mhm.

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